5 Replies Latest reply on Jan 14, 2009 3:46 PM by Webshark2000

    How Important Are Broadcast Colors?

    Webshark2000 Level 1
      I know the purpose of broadcast colors, keeping your IRE levels above 7.5 and below 100, but how important is this if you're not going to broadcast? If you're just making a video for DVD and web, do you still need to apply Broadcast Colors to your entire project? Is there a chance of your video damaging televisions? Are the newer televisions (i.e. LCDs, Plasmas, etc) still prone to this type of damage?
        • 1. Re: How Important Are Broadcast Colors?
          Jim_Simon Level 8
          I've never used the effect and have never had any problems.
          • 2. Re: How Important Are Broadcast Colors?
            Webshark2000 Level 1
            Thanks Jim. Have you ever noticed that if you do have a clip that has a very high luminance in some spots and you dissolve on a title or lower third that it brings down the luminance of those overexposed spots while the graphic is begin dissolved on or off?
            • 3. Re: How Important Are Broadcast Colors?
              Dan Isaacs Level 2
              OK... here's the thing (and sorry if this is a non-answer, but it is certainly relevant)

              AME CS3 always forces a RGB conversion before outputting to MPEG-2 or H.264 ... and these conversion are done using Rec. 601 coefficients, so I think it is actually impossible to burn a DVD or BluRay disc from CS3 with anything BUT "legal" colors.
              • 4. Re: How Important Are Broadcast Colors?
                Dag Norum Level 2
                >Is there a chance of your video damaging televisions? Are the newer televisions (i.e. LCDs, Plasmas, etc) still prone to this type of damage?

                A DVD is digital, meaning it will whatsoever NEVER give out more than all bits set to 1 (or set to high in other wording). That is an absolute limit! And then, the digital to analog converter will only put out what its max is for all bits = 1, also an absolute limit. And I can assure you that any input circuity that receive that output from the digital to analog converter will tolerate that signal (unless the designers were drunk and everybody in the quality assurance department also was more than drunk).

                Now, of course, if you made a DVD with only white video that made all bits be 1, and played that over and over for a long time on your TV (CRT, or "tube"), yes, you would probably, after a year or two, see some degradation to your TV's screen.

                By now I hope you understand that plasma and LCD which is digital to "the end", just can't get over-loaded.

                But, screen-savers are there for a reason, and that's only for "tear and wear" (sp?) and "burn in" (burn in is mostly for CRT's though).

                Broadcast colors are something to be aware of though. It is a hang-over from an all analog world with signals that could go "all over the limits" and screw up circuitry. Probably not so much ruin them (they made limiters before also) but make them to behave funny.

                It seems to me like some encoders (maybe more codecs) have this "taste of the hang-over" because sometimes they do strange things when it comes to "very high luminance in some spots".

                So, have it mind, but like Jim, I haven't had too much problems with that (making sure I'm within broadcast colors). I think it's all about testing your output (DVD or web) before delivery.

                Dag
                • 5. Re: How Important Are Broadcast Colors?
                  Webshark2000 Level 1
                  Thanks for the responses and information.