18 Replies Latest reply on Feb 20, 2009 7:58 AM by the_wine_snob

    Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio

    Level 1
      My Panasonic camera shoots quicktime .mov JPEG videos in a 720X408 px resolution. I am having a very hard time editing them in Premiere, because I cannot get it to export them in a correct pixel aspect ratio.

      Maybe you can figure out what I'm doing wrong. Here's what I do.

      First, when opening a new project, the closest frame size I can choose is 720x480. So I choose that. I import the .mov file into it, and put it on the time line. At that point it looks like this:

      http://img291.imageshack.us/img291/812/premierewindowoc9.jpg

      Correct aspect ratio and no deformation.

      When I try to export it as a .mov file, I do the following: I click on settings (in the file save dialogue), and go to video settings. I can choose any pixel aspect ratio, it all produces the same results, but for example, let's say, DVCPRO (1.5) (that's the closest to the size I need).

      I can manually set my frame size to be 720x408 px, assuming that now the frame size will be exactly the same size as my video and no deformation will occur.

      However, the result I get is this:

      http://img6.imageshack.us/img6/6730/exportedmoviehl5.jpg

      I've drawn arrows on that to make it clearer. So, I have a movie that's 720x408px. Premiere exports a frame sized 720x408, but then for some strange reason shrinks the actual video down to 483x480!!??!! Leaving completely unnecessary black bars on the sides.

      Why does it do this?

      When I export it with frame size 720x480, it doesn't add black lines on top and bottom as you'd expect. It does exactly the same thing you see in the image above.

      I have tried many other combinations too. I have tried exporting it as every other available pixel aspect ratio, also as an avi file, nothing makes any difference. It always shrinks the original video in width, and adds black bars to the left and right.

      What am I doing wrong??
        • 1. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
          Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP
          What camera? What is the aspect ratio of the 720x408 etc.

          You're using the wrong preset coming in.
          • 2. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
            Jim_Simon Level 8
            My general recommendation is to use only a tape based MiniDV video camera for taking videos, and only take pictures with still cameras.
            • 3. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
              Level 1
              Stanley Jones - the camera is panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ5. The aspect ratio is 16:9.

              What do you meanby "using the wrong preset"? Is that the thing it asks you to choose when you're opening a new project? If so then, I always choose a preset that's 16:9.
              I think I've tried them all, but which one do you recommend I should use?

              Jim Simon - thanks, but that's not very helpful, is it.
              • 4. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                Jim_Simon Level 8
                Depends on how you look at it. If you see this as a learning experience, go out and get a proper video camera, then your editing problems on this front will vanish.
                • 5. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                  Level 1
                  That is not an option. I have no intention to cash out ridiculous amounts of money just to occasionally put a video of my cat on youtube.

                  Premiere opens quicktime movies, so it must have been made for more than just MiniDV.

                  If you don't have any rational suggestions to help me with my actual problem, such as, some advice on how to achieve an optimal import and export of a quicktime file, or even which software to use instead of premiere if premiere isn't the best option, please stop posting in this topic. "Buy an expensive camera or give up" is not the solution.
                  • 6. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                    Jim_Simon Level 8
                    >Premiere opens quicktime movies

                    Not all of them. Quicktime, like AVI, is just a wrapper. What's inside is what counts. If it's DV inside, then it should work fine (at least on a Mac). If something else is inside, it may or may not work.

                    Given that Premiere is designed as a professional level NLE, and has a tendency to work better with more professional media, you may want to check out some other editing app for putting the occasional video of your cat on YouTube. Windows Movie maker, Premiere Elements & Movie Edit Pro from Magix are three you may want to look at.
                    • 7. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                      Level 1
                      Ok, that's useful. Thanks for the info.

                      How do I check if the mov file is DV inside?

                      I have used Windows Movie Maker before, but I don't like it because it's unable to export the movie in a high enough bitrate, it degrades the quality too much.

                      I may give Elements a try if you think it would work better, honestly though, I thought that was just like Premiere pro but with a few features less? (kind of like photoshop and photoshop elements?)

                      I've never heard of Movie Edit Pro, thanks for that one, I'll check it out. :)
                      • 8. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                        Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP
                        > My Panasonic camera shoots quicktime .mov JPEG videos in a 720X408 px resolution.

                        That's not what the specs say.

                        The options for motion images appear to be: 4:3 Aspect Ratio 640 x 480 or 320 x 240 at 30 fps or 10fps. At 16:9 Aspect Ratio 848 x 480 (30 fps or 10 fps) and 1280 x 720 (30fps or 15fps).

                        The format for motion images is QuickTime Motion JPEG. (This gets referred to as M-JPEG, not JPEG.)

                        Use GSpot to tell you what is in the source file. (It is not fully useful with quicktime. You might also open the movie in QT and see what is says for the movie properties.)

                        http://www.headbands.com/gspot/
                        • 9. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                          Phil Griffith Level 2
                          >That is not an option. I have no intention to cash out ridiculous amounts of money just to occasionally put a video of my cat on youtube.

                          So you went out and spent (?? )approx $500 for adobe premiere? to shoot video of your cat?
                          • 10. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                            Jim_Simon Level 8
                            >How do I check if the mov file is DV inside?

                            You would have gotten the clip from a tape-based MiniDV video camera, as they are the only ones that shoot DV.
                            • 11. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                              Jim_Simon Level 8
                              >So you went out and spent (?? )approx $500 for adobe premiere?

                              Phil's got a point. A proper video camera can cost much less than this software.
                              • 12. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                                Level 1
                                > - So you went out and spent (?? )approx $500 for adobe premiere? to shoot video of your cat?

                                No, a computer at my work has Premiere CS3 installed. I figured I'd see if it can do what I need. I could have also installed just a trial, no? My home computer may need more RAM first though. I didn't crack it, if that's what you're getting at.

                                > - That's not what the specs say.

                                > - The options for motion images appear to be: 4:3 Aspect Ratio 640 x 480 or 320 x 240 at 30 fps or 10fps. At 16:9 Aspect Ratio 848 x 480 (30 fps or 10 fps) and 1280 x 720 (30fps or 15fps).

                                > - The format for motion images is QuickTime Motion JPEG. (This gets referred to as M-JPEG, not JPEG.)

                                > - Use GSpot to tell you what is in the source file. (It is not fully useful with quicktime. You might also open the movie in QT and see what is says for the movie properties.)

                                > - http://www.headbands.com/gspot/

                                Ok I tried gspot, but it couldn't read anything from the file. You're right though, the inspector in quicktime says

                                Format: PHOTO - JPEG, 761 X 431, Millions 8-bit unsigned integer, Mono, 8.000 KHz
                                Normal size: 848 x 480

                                I'm confused, I'm sure yesterday when I was checking it it said 720x408 (which is the same aspect ratio, just reduced size).

                                I guess it's not DV then anyway.

                                I'll give these other programs Jim Simon mentioned a go then, thanks!
                                • 13. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                                  the_wine_snob Level 9
                                  Tina,

                                  Lets see if we can get kitty onto YouTube.

                                  There are four issues, that you will need to overcome:

                                  1.) Project Preset to begin. Stanley lists the possible choices in post #8, based on the specs of your camera. You will have to determine which of these you used to record the files. These are *probably* set in your cameras menu area, and if you have not changed them, are probably still set. That will get you started in the right direction - but wait, theres more...

                                  2.) It seems that your camera uses Motion-JPG as the encoder to create these files. There are at least two good Motion-JPG CODECs available, Lead and Morgan. Plus, your camera may well have come with its own Motion-JPG CODEC. The CODEC is what allows your camera to encode/compress the video data, and also what allows programs like Premiere to decode that data. Did your camera come with a CD/DVD with software on it? If so, the installation of that software *should* install any proprietary CODECs to your system. Now, if this was the case (or soon will be the case, when you locate that CD/DVD), Premiere *possibly* will be able to use that CODEC to handle the footage from your camera. If it does not, then it is *possibly* only a matter of purchasing, downloading and installing one of the two mentioned Motion-JPG CODECs. Both are relatively inexpensive, and Premiere *usually* can work with either, though your exact footage might not permit this. This is usually because a camera mfgr. chose to do their own thing. Thats why any disc that came with the camera is the first place to start.

                                  3.) Now, you are in Premiere, have the proper CODEC installed on your system, and have Imported the footage into a Project with the proper Presets. If all is working, and I hope that it is, you just edit your footage.

                                  4.) You have been working with Presets established based on your footage. That is likely not exactly what you will want to upload to YouTube. This is where Export comes into play. Unfortunately, YouTube seems to change the specs. weekly. About the time that someone publishes fool-proof details and settings for YouTube, they (YouTube) change everything. The best advice is to search as many fora, as you can for Export Settings for YouTube. Look at the dates for all articles. You really will only care about the most recent - very recent.

                                  Going back up the list, there is another possibility. That would be to use a 3rd party conversion program to convert your footage to a DV-AVI Type II file. Often, with the proper CODEC installed, Premiere can do this internally, though not always, and even when it works, there can be problems. I use DigitalMedia Converter (Deskshare) a shareware program for most of my conversions. There are many freeware, and shareware, conversion programs available. Many get mentioned in this forum. Many get glowing reviews. Some are easier to use, than others.

                                  Some balk at the thought of owning Premiere Pro and then having to use some 3rd party software to get their footage into a robust NLE, that they paid good money for. The fact is that Premiere Pro was designed to work primarily with DV-AVI Type II files, from mini tape cameras - the point made by several. That does not mean that it cannot work with other file types. It does, though not always without problems. Sometimes just passing the material through a conversion program will clear up all problems and no one is the wiser. I often use Premiere Elements, Pros little bitty brother, to convert some file formats, because it is more tolerant of many of these, than is Pro.

                                  Good luck, and sorry that I do not have a current suggestion for Export to YouTube. Since it is a hot distribution medium, you should have no problem finding the correct settings for today - be sure to check the date of all articles, as the specs change all the time and in a heartbeat.

                                  Let us know if you have any more questions. For "how things are done in Premiere," I recommend the Premiere-wikia: http://premierepro.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page
                                  for tutorials. Most that you could want to do will be there someplace. The current YouTube setting might be an exception, just because every time the Wikia gets updated, that info is out of date.

                                  Hunt
                                  • 14. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                                    Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP
                                    > Format: PHOTO - JPEG, 761 X 431, Millions 8-bit unsigned integer, Mono, 8.000 KHz Normal size: 848 x 480

                                    Photo JPEG is not the same as Motion JPEG. And even though the QT properties say PHOTO JPEG, your camera specs say it is storing Motion JPEG. So I'll just say I haven't a clue.

                                    Try Hunt's suggestions. Also, find a Panasonic group and ask them how they are editing these.

                                    > I have used Windows Movie Maker before, but I don't like it because it's unable to export the movie in a high enough bitrate, it degrades the quality too much.

                                    Well, since you've only shot with this lower quality setting from your camera, I don't think that is an issue. You can export DV AVI from WMM; you can also export higher data rate wmv etc.

                                    If you'll shoot a 10 second clip and post it somewhere, I'll play with it.

                                    You should also shoot the HD version; you may find it easier to edit than this odd size.
                                    • 15. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                                      the_wine_snob Level 9
                                      Stanley,

                                      Thanks for pointing that out. You typed it, I saw it, but did not read it properly. Also, I had forgotten about the Panasonic CODEC.

                                      Guess I had two "DUH! moments" in the same reply.

                                      Hunt
                                      • 16. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                                        Level 1
                                        Guys!
                                        I have to say, thank you SO much for your lengthy responses, I appreciate all your advice greatly, some of it will be useful even outside using premiere in the future. Thank you!

                                        But I have to let you know, I got home tonight and I installed MAGIX Movie Edit Pro that Jim recommended, and it does everything I wanted to do with my movies, and it exports them in perfect shape, formats and quality, it is absolutely perfect for my needs!

                                        So I guess I won't be using Premiere for this after all.

                                        Thank you Jim for recommending me this program, and thanks everyone else for taking the time to offer more help in the meantime. :)

                                        yaaay happy end!
                                        • 17. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                                          Jim_Simon Level 8
                                          >Thank you Jim for recommending me this program

                                          You're welcome. I know a guy who tends to throw all kinds of weird stuff at it without issue, so I figured it might suit your needs.
                                          • 18. Re: Premiere exports in incorrect pixel aspect ratio
                                            the_wine_snob Level 9
                                            Tina,

                                            Your "toolbox" can never contain too many tools - just so long as you can find them. I use Magix MEP (along with several of their audio programs), also Premiere Elements and Cyberlink Power Director. Sometimes the biggest, most robust program is just not right for a particular job.

                                            Hunt