7 Replies Latest reply on Aug 31, 2007 7:36 AM by Harm Millaard

    Working with network drives

    (frustrated_one) Level 1
      Hi,

      As storage was becoming a problem I bought a network storage enclosure which stores 2 SATA 500GB Hard drives. The idea is to just keep inserting new drives when each one runs out.

      But since I have started using this, (round about the same time as upgrading to CS3) it takes ppro up to 15 mins to open a project. not a huge on either.

      Im editing HDV from SONY V1E, 2Gb RAM, Dual core 3Ghz, Win XP.

      Does anyone work from network drives? Anybody have any thoughts??

      Thanks...

      ps, also if i am working in ppro and change windows, to check email, etc. it takes around 3-4 mins for ppro to respond once i go back in...(?)
        • 1. Re: Working with network drives
          Level 1
          Editing native HDV is part of the reason why it takes long.

          I have no experience with a network storage enclosure.
          • 2. Re: Working with network drives
            Harm Millaard Level 7


            This works OK. So the question is what NAS is it, or is it a SAN, what OS is used on the server, what is your configuration in terms of LAN? Or is it just the enclosure (physical box) but not on a server and connected locally? What type of connection?
            • 3. Re: Working with network drives
              (frustrated_one) Level 1
              Hi,

              (I really shoud have given all the details...)

              The Server is on XP, as am I.
              The enclosure is a Datalink NAS, 1 Gb LAN.
              http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=509

              I initially purchased it to use locally, but was told i really need to connect it to the network.

              I am the only person who has access to the enclosure also.

              the drives are Western digital 500Gb, i use the same in my tower, they're real good.

              Im unsure about the LAN configuration.

              Would you suggest i just put up with the time or try putting the drives in my PC(which would really render the NAS useless!)?

              cheers,

              Andrew
              • 4. Re: Working with network drives
                Harm Millaard Level 7
                A 1 Gb/s LAN should in theory give you a bandwidth of 125 MB/s, slightly less than SATA1, but still sufficient for editing. With the drives being SATA2 it should be easy to keep up. Of course there is overhead from the network which degrades performance. How long is your project and where are the media and preview files stored? How many processes are running when PP is active?
                • 5. Re: Working with network drives
                  (frustrated_one) Level 1
                  Hi,

                  The preview files are stored in the C: drive on my PC, these play fine.
                  The project is about 15 minutes long, so far, but I have about 80Gb of files in the project in total.

                  I think because the server feeds everyone here (10 people) through the same connection (which i have to share), this must be slowing down the importing of large files.
                  I might try to connect the enclosure locally, so i don't have to fight for bandwidth.

                  Oh, yeah usually only a couple of applications are running (ppro, email, etc.) but in the task manager there could be up to 70 processes. I don't know what half them are though!!

                  cheers
                  • 6. Re: Working with network drives
                    (frustrated_one) Level 1
                    I just thought, would this be slowing down my renders?

                    If the bandwidth between me and the media enclosure is to blame, this will inevitably slow down any process of creating files, etc.

                    Is that right?
                    • 7. Re: Working with network drives
                      Harm Millaard Level 7
                      That is correct, but also the number of processes running slows down your system. You could easily reduce that to 40 processes maximum. Use Process Explorer from http://www.sysinternals.com to determine what you can kill. Also, dividing the bandwidth of 125 MB/s across ten users will be a bottleneck.