8 Replies Latest reply on Nov 28, 2007 7:25 PM by Jorgen Bjerke

    Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?

    Level 1
      I know that HDV is upper field first. We capture and edit, and then use the Adobe Media Encoder to export a .m2v.
      What gives the best quality? I'm partial to clicking 'Deinterlace' and setting the Fields to 'Progressive'.
      Is that the best way to export HDV to DVD? Should I be deinterlacing? Or should I leave it interlaced? And if I do, should it be UFF or LFF? AND, if it IS interlaced, won't it look all mucked up if the DVD is played back on a computer?
        • 1. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
          Harm Millaard Level 7
          Even commercial DVD's from Hollywood are interlaced, so unless you want to throw away 50% of your vertical resolution, keep it interlaced. Software players on the PC will convert the interlaced material automatically for PC monitors. The best (only) settings are LFF and 720x480 NTSC or 720x576 PAL.
          • 2. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
            Level 1
            That is what makes me curious. Is there an issue going from HDV UFF to DVD LFF?
            As I export my .m2v (DVD file) I have an option to make it UFF. Would this yield better results?
            • 3. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
              Harm Millaard Level 7
              In my experience there is no issue with going from HDV UFF to DVD LFF.
              • 4. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
                Level 1
                Alright, I just tested it.
                Here is what I found.
                I had an HDV file with a really "bad" pan in it where I quickly swept from one subject to another. I put no effects or anything on it.
                I went to the Adobe Media Encoder with the following settings:

                NTSC
                Interlaced
                Quality: 5
                Bit Rate: CBR, 8 Mbps

                I made one UFF and one LFF. I burned them to a DVD, and watched them back to back.
                They were both so identicle that there was absolutely no difference between me and 3 other employees looking at the footage. Visually, there was no difference.
                So then I imported both .m2vs into Premiere. I loaded both of them into the Source monitor, so I could look at individual frames.
                The LFF one had a "dropped line" at the very bottom. As if the very last field was missing, and appeared as solid black, although I have a suspicion it might actually be alpha. In Encore, it actually showed up as a very thin line of garbled reds and greens and blues and whites. But only in the preview. Nothing appeared on screen.
                The UFF seemed a bit more accurate. The fields spanned from top to bottom, with no "jiggling" at top OR bottom.
                I went to the middle of a quick pan, and put matching frames from both files on top of one another, then quickly went back and forth to compare differences.
                The LFF file seemed to have some "mushing" in the quick pans. As if someone went in there and kind of rubbed out some of the detail. The UFF still appeared sharp, and still had very concice interlaced stepping all the way through.
                Therefore, on a screen, I saw NO difference. But in Premiere, comparing both, it seems that going UFF is a bit sharper and a bit more technically accurate.
                If anyone wants to try this out for themselves, please share.
                But in my oppinion, with HDV footage going on to DVD, here are the best export settings:

                .m2v
                (leave it interlaced)
                quality of 5 (out of 5)
                CBR, 8 Mbps
                Field Order: Upper Field First

                Let me know what you think.
                • 5. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
                  Harm Millaard Level 7
                  Interesting. I never tried that approach, but I will try it myself and let you know what I found.
                  • 6. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
                    Jorgen Bjerke
                    One important question Corey: Did you watch your DVD on a TV monitor or on a computer monitor?

                    If the fields are reversed you will not see any differencee on a computer monitor unless you use players that support interlaced playback. But you willdefinitiallyy see a huge difference on a TV screen (it will give you headache!)
                    • 7. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
                      Level 1
                      I watched it on both, Jorgen. I've played it in multiple DVD players as UFF and it seems to work perfectly fine. No stepping, no weirdness, and definitely no headaches.
                      Why do you say this?
                      • 8. Re: Should HDV, being exported to DVD, be UFF or LFF?
                        Jorgen Bjerke Level 1
                        Because if UFF and LFF really made a difference, you would not see it on a computer monitor anyways.