5 Replies Latest reply on Jan 30, 2009 7:54 AM by Colin Brougham

    importing/ingesting P2 footage for Premiere Pro CS4

    kevindeshields
      I hope there's something I'm missing here because otherwise, this is ridiculous. I want to be able to use the Media Browser to navigate to my P2 Cards, import the files AND copy them to my hard drive for editing in Premiere Pro CS4. I'm currently able to use the Media Browser to import the files from the P2 cards into my project. However, the files are not copied to my hard drive...they just stay on the P2 card. Obviously, this is a useless function because I need to be able to clear the P2 cards after I import the footage.

      Now, I know how to copy the files from the P2 card to my hard drive using the Finder or Panasonic's P2CMS software and then bring them into Premiere. However, that process is a bit cumbersome (I found Final Cut Pro's method much more streamlined).

      Please tell me I'm missing something (like a preference??). Can I not just use the Media Browser to drag and drop the clips from the P2 card into my project (which would then copy them on to my scratch disk)?

      Again, I already know how to get P2 footage into my project using the other methods, I just want a more streamlined workflow.
        • 1. Re: importing/ingesting P2 footage for Premiere Pro CS4
          Colin Brougham Level 6
          Nope, that's the way it works. Due to the fact that PPro handles the P2 MXF files natively, there is no need to rewrap the way that FCP does. You'll have to copy the files from the cards first, either using Explorer, P2 Viewer, P2CMS, P2Forge, or any of the other P2 management apps out there.
          • 2. Re: importing/ingesting P2 footage for Premiere Pro CS4
            shooternz Level 6
            >I found Final Cut Pro's method much more streamlined

            Well it might be if you are happy creating intermediate files and using the tedious log and transfer workflow.

            I use P2 Forge for Ingesting Functions and as Colin says, the use of native mxf files is by far prefereable.

            Use the CS4 browser to import the files to project, if you wish, after ingesting to your HD . I find it quicker to drag them in directly from an Explorer Window
            • 3. Re: importing/ingesting P2 footage for Premiere Pro CS4
              kevindeshields Level 1
              Thanks everyone for the quick responses. I suppose old habits die hard. I was hoping there would be an automated feature that would copy P2 contents (using the Media Browser) into my scratch disk without manually doing it. But it's no big deal to create a folder and drag the contents in there via the Finder/Explorer. As you've probably guessed, I just converted from FCP to Premiere Pro (mainly for the round trip functionality with AE).
              • 4. Re: importing/ingesting P2 footage for Premiere Pro CS4
                joshtownsend Level 2
                There is a program that copies and auto formats the P2 cards. Can't remember the name of it I'll try to find it.

                I stopped using it and just use explorer because I always back up too at least 2 hard drives when shooting and it's just plain simple.

                You have to admit that the media browser is pretty cool and it's pretty amazing that you can stick the card in and see the footage right away. 'Media Browser' is the fastest way to look up P2 card video PERIOD. I wouldn't be on this forum if it wasn't part Premiere CS4.

                Craig and Colin know what they're talking about that's for sure. The cool thing about CS4 is now you don't have to drag all the files into the project then edit them. Now you can look at, trim and then stick the clip on the timeline. You don't have to drag the media to the project folder then put it in the timelne.

                It's so simple it can be confusing.
                • 5. Re: importing/ingesting P2 footage for Premiere Pro CS4
                  Colin Brougham Level 6
                  You're right about that, Josh--I've been so used to doing it a certain way that I feel like maybe I'm not doing something right when it comes to the Media Browser. But (unlike so many other things in CS4), it just plain works.

                  Kevin: What you're suggesting might be a good suggestion to the engineering folks. It would be useful if you were in a remote situation, and had CS4 installed on a laptop, and wanted to use it for both offloading and logging. I'd recommend filling out a Feature Request. It would be nice to have all that functionality with one application, instead of leapfrogging (though I do like P2Forge for other reasons, namely metadata management). This would be a welcome addition to OnLocation, as well.