11 Replies Latest reply on Jan 10, 2009 1:32 PM by Steve Grisetti

    VHS to DVD

      I am in the current process of moving my old VHS tapes to dvd. I am doing it by first recording it with my Panasonic dvd recorder, then importing it into premiere elements to format it and make it look better. My problems occur when i but the finished product back on dvd. On my tv the picture is extremely jittery. Fast motion looks horrible. How do i stop this and keep the picture smooth?
      I am currently using Premiere Elements 4.0
        • 1. Re: VHS to DVD
          Paul_LS Level 4
          PE7 uses a DV-AVI workflow and expects video to be lower field first. MPEG/VOB files are upper field first. You therefore need to reverse the field order for the clips. You need to apply Reverse Field Dominance to the clips, right click on the clip, select Field Order and then Reverse Field Dominance.
          Otherwise when you start your project select the Hard Drive Camcorder project preset and the program will automatically reverse the field dominance for you. Then use the "DVD, Camcorder or Drive" import option to get the clips off the DVD, this should set the field order correctly.
          • 2. Re: VHS to DVD
            John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP
            When you go from vhs to dvd, you are compressing a LOT... and that means that trying to edit dvd files means you are starting with data that really is not meant to be edited, only viewed

            You might look at http://www.videoguys.com/pyroAVlink.html

            Or Canopus brand http://www.videoguys.com/canopus.htm

            An old, probably gone message said...
            http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx/.3bc4789d
            "Matt with Grass Valley Canopus in their tech support department
            stated that the 110 will suffice for most hobbyist. If a person
            has a lot of tapes that were played often the tape stretches and
            the magnetic coding diminishes. If your goal is to encode tapes
            in good shape buy the 110, if you will be encoding old tapes of
            poor quality buy the 300"

            DV AVI is about 13Gig per hour, so you should plan on putting files on a 2nd hard drive (not a partition on one drive) for best data flow
            • 3. Re: VHS to DVD
              Level 1
              When grabbing that video from the DVD, i am using the "media downloader" from within premiere elements 4. After importing the clips, in the time line i switch the field dominance in the "field options > reverse field dominance". Doing this, i saw no change in the way the DVD looked on my tv. I might have even got worse, its hard to tell but it did not help. I looks fine when played on the computer, its just my DVD players. To give further information on exactly what im doing. I have my VHS player hooked up the my DVD recorder. I am recording 2 hours at a time onto DVD-RW discs. I am then importing the files on the DVD-RW disc to my computer in premiere elements 4 . My plan is to put the videos on DVD+R DL discs when done. I am doing very little editing, mostly just menu looks, to the videos themselves. I am simply doing this to get 4 hours of video with a nice menu structure onto DVD+R DL discs, to cut down on the number of total finished discs. To test them, i am burning the finished video onto the DVD-RW discs with only 2 hours of video. Is there anything i can do differently to get the video to my computer or did i switch the setting wrong in premiere elements. I have not used premiere elements a lot before and do not know much about the program itself. Thank you for any help, it is greatly appreciated!
              • 4. Re: VHS to DVD
                the_wine_snob Level 9
                my2009ch,

                The best workflow for going A/D (in your case VHS to Digital) is to capture with an A/D device as DV-AVI in the first place. Even with little editing, what happens in the VHS to DVD to Premiere (any flavor) to DVD is that you have two MPEG compressions: the first going to the DVD-RW and the second, when you go to the DVD-9. This will definitely degrade your material.

                I'd look into an A/D capture device (better), or an A/D capture card. Use the software provided to capture to DV-AVI, edit in PE, and then Export to DVD-DL. Only one MPEG compression. You WILL need some HDD real estate, as DV-AVI is about 13GB/hour.

                The FAQs list some recommended A/D devices, and John lists a good one in his reply.

                Hunt
                • 5. Re: VHS to DVD
                  John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP
                  Bill is exactly right... going from analog to DVD to edit to DVD is not going to result in the best video

                  I've never used an external device, as I started way back with Premiere 6 and a DV500 card, to digitize my home video made with a Sony 8mm analog camcorder... lots more about that at my notes page at http://www.pacifier.com/~jtsmith/ADOBE.HTM

                  You MAY be OK with just one hard drive... I have two, an 80gig boot drive for all software and a 100 or 120 Gig drive for all video... this works well for SD material (all I do) although I've read that a RAID setup is need for HD material due to the higher data transfer rate that is required

                  Also, once you have everything working well, you should think about making a full picture of your software drive to an external USB hard drive, for an easy restore in case of a virus or drive crash

                  What I use is...

                  Terabyte's Image program makes a full drive image for backup - it will span multiple CD/DVD discs or write to a USB hard drive - as far as I know (I have multiple identical 80Gig boot drives which I rotate via removable drive housings, creating a backup and restore before I install or remove any programs) this program goes directly to the drive hardware to backup and restore EVERYTHING on a drive, even the "hidden" parts that software vendors use to store registration information

                  Note - my sister-in-law got hit by a destructive virus in early November (she was one of those people who got infected between the time the virus hit the internet and her anti-virus company updated their program files) and I was, since I had just made a full backup for her in late October, able to put her computer back in order with only the loss of a couple weeks worth of emails and a Word document or two... and then the first order of business after the full restore was to immediately run Windows Update and go to her anti-virus vendor's web site for an upate so she would stay safe

                  Anyway, since she does not understand making data backups herself, Image was the ONLY thing that saved the day and kept her from losing ALL of her data files

                  Dos version is small enough to run off a 3.5 inch boot disk
                  http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/image-for-dos.htm

                  Linux version creates a bootable CD, you MUST use this version if you have a USB mouse or keyboard (the DOS version won't work if you have a USB mouse or keyboard) or if you don't have a 3.5 inch boot disk
                  http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/image-for-linux.htm
                  • 6. Re: VHS to DVD
                    Level 1
                    That is exactly what I am doing!<br />Since I don't have any capture device, in my case I use a cheapie "dual <br />deck" to convert to dvd, then use mpeg_streamclip to import the files and <br />convert to .dv (about 10gb per hour) - I do this because PE7 will not import <br />the .vob's off my dvd<br />Then I load the 2-hour file into PE, cut it into the pieces I want, add menu <br />and burn 2 copies.<br />In my case I also output the pieces (with fade in/out) to small avi files so <br />we can watch them on the computer easily as well.<br /><br />Mark<br /><br /><br /><my2009ch@adobeforums.com> wrote in message <br />news:59b72ab2.2@webcrossing.la2eafNXanI...<br />> When grabbing that video from the DVD, i am using the "media downloader" <br />> from within premiere elements 4. After importing the clips, in the time <br />> line i switch the field dominance in the "field options > reverse field <br />> dominance". Doing this, i saw no change in the way the DVD looked on my <br />> tv. I might have even got worse, its hard to tell but it did not help. I <br />> looks fine when played on the computer, its just my DVD players. To give <br />> further information on exactly what im doing. I have my VHS player hooked <br />> up the my DVD recorder. I am recording 2 hours at a time onto DVD-RW <br />> discs. I am then importing the files on the DVD-RW disc to my computer in <br />> premiere elements 4 . My plan is to put the videos on DVD+R DL discs when <br />> done. I am doing very little editing, mostly just menu looks, to the <br />> videos themselves. I am simply doing this to get 4 hours of video with a <br />> nice menu structure onto DVD+R DL discs, to cut down on the number of <br />> total finished discs. To test them, i am burning the finished video onto <br />> the DVD-RW discs with only 2 hours of video. Is there anything i can do <br />> differently to get the video to my computer or did i switch the setting <br />> wrong in premiere elements. I have not used premiere elements a lot before <br />> and do not know much about the program itself. Thank you for any help, it <br />> is greatly appreciated!
                    • 7. Re: VHS to DVD
                      Hello I was having the same problem with my video looking very jittery once it was burned to DVD and I followed the advice about reversing the field dominence and it worked! Thank goodness because I had over 20 hours into this project and didn't want it to be a waste of time. Although now that I have switched the dominence all of the transitions I used are jittery?? Does anyone know how to fix that?? I am working with Adobe Premiere Elements 2.0

                      thank you so much!

                      Erica
                      • 8. Re: VHS to DVD
                        Bill Hunt in 2 posts says "The FAQs list some recommended A/D devices" but I am not finding. Please elaborate. It appears to me the first class way to go is Canopus ADVC 300 keeping a reasonable cost. I assume this will convert analog directly to .avi files that are read by Premier Elements 4. The documentation only comments on Premier compatability.
                        • 9. Re: VHS to DVD
                          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional
                          http://www.adobeforums.com/webx/.3bb95e46
                          • 10. Re: VHS to DVD
                            the_wine_snob Level 9
                            Thanks Steve,

                            I was going to go in search for the exact entry, but you beat me to it. You must have that URL tattooed on your forearm.

                            Hunt
                            • 11. Re: VHS to DVD
                              Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional
                              Oh yes!

                              Actually, I'm the forum host and I've written nearly all of the 160+ FAQs for this forum, so I've nearly got them memorized. (They also served as a great reference when I wrote my new book!)