6 Replies Latest reply on Jan 20, 2009 6:39 PM by John T Smith

    Video playback very jumpy and twitchy after rendering...

      Ok, Heres the deal...

      I am using premier elements 3.0 on a windows XP OS.
      I have been working on editing a scene in my movie for about a month, I have it almost done, but last night, when I was rendering it, it said it was running low on disk space. I decided to use my 1TB external hard drive as a scratch disk so I can free up some space. It rendered it to that, and when I went to see watch what I had made, it was playing back really weird. It was very jumpy, and jittery. It seemed like the video and audio was all shaken up, and couldn't play right... Its never done this before, and its really pissing me off.

      I did export it to a MPEG, and watched it on WMP, and it played just fine. Just not in Premier.

      Any help would be great.
        • 1. Re: Video playback very jumpy and twitchy after rendering...
          Paul_LS Level 4
          Does this only start happening after you moved the project to the external drive? Did you render the preview by hitting the Enter key on your keyboard?
          • 2. Re: Video playback very jumpy and twitchy after rendering...
            Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional
            Also, what is your source video -- what type of camcorder does it come from and how did you get it into your computer? Your symptoms seem to indicate that you're using the wrong project settings for your source file type.
            • 3. Re: Video playback very jumpy and twitchy after rendering...
              the_wine_snob Level 9
              Kirk,

              Hopefully the last question: what is the connection type for your external.

              If the connection is slow, or is compromised by having too many other peripherials on it, the feed to PE will be slowed down and will often yield results, such as you are seeing.

              A better setup might be to use the external to move a lot of material off of your internal HDD's, and use one of them for editing.

              I do edit to/from externals, but they are on a FW-800 dual-chip controller. I expreienced similar problems, when I tried to edit to/from USB 2.0 externals. The entire process was sluggish for me.

              Good luck,

              Hunt
              • 4. Re: Video playback very jumpy and twitchy after rendering...
                Level 1
                I am using a Kodak Easyshare Z1285.

                I just use the USB cable to import it to Adobe Premier. For some reason, It automatically saves my videos and pics to folders in "my video's" in my documents folder.

                It started being jittery only after a set all the settings to use my scratch disk... What is a HDD too? My internal Hard Drive is just my C: drive, which is very low on memory because off all these darned premier files.

                I deleted all the render files for the project, and rendered it again, which took 4 hours to render the 5 minutes of video.... It still jumped and acted weird.

                Any help is appreciated.
                • 5. Re: Video playback very jumpy and twitchy after rendering...
                  John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP
                  One, I don't what software you are using, but I do know that Premiere does NOT work with a USB connection... it only works with Firewire

                  Two, unless that camera creates DV AVI type 2 files... unlikely since you are using a USB connection... they are most likely some type of MJPEG that do not edit well in Premiere

                  Three, editing works better with two PHYSICAL hard drives... one drive for all software and the second drive for all video files
                  • 6. Re: Video playback very jumpy and twitchy after rendering...
                    Level 1
                    Hi Kirk,

                    > I just use the USB cable to import it to Adobe Premier. For some reason,
                    > It automatically saves my videos and pics to folders in "my video's" in my
                    > documents folder.
                    >

                    Since that is a camera and not a camcorder, the USB cable is the normal way
                    to transfer pictures and videos to the computer. They would not be captured
                    by Premiere Elements and you would not use firewire -- unlike a camcorder.
                    It sounds like you have software installed that autoplays when the camera is
                    connected to do the transfer. That could have been in software you
                    installed with the camera, or a downloader like the one that installed with
                    Photoshop Elements. In any event, it's not a problem. Depending on the
                    software doing the transfer, you may be able to change the default transfer
                    location.

                    > It started being jittery only after a set all the settings to use my
                    > scratch disk... What is a HDD too? My internal Hard Drive is just my C:
                    > drive, which is very low on memory because off all these darned premier
                    > files.
                    >
                    HDD stands for Hard Disk Drive. Generally, that's your internal drive, or
                    an external disk drive, or the disk drive on an HDD camcorder that uses a
                    disk drive instead of a tape, dvd, or memory stick. What context did you
                    find it in?

                    As you've discovered, video requires a lot of disk storage. You really do
                    need either a second internal disk drive or an external disk drive for your
                    project and video files. You don't want to put them on your C drive.
                    Especially if that's all you have and you have an older PC with a limited
                    amount of space available.

                    It's not clear what you mean by changing the settings to use your scratch
                    disk. Do you have an external drive? The Premiere Elements scratch disk
                    settings default to "same as project" and that's generally what you want.
                    Allocate the project on the external drive and the temporary render and
                    cache files will be in the same location. If you have a separate folder for
                    each project, clean up is easy after you've completed your project.

                    Changing the location of the scratch files wouldn't cause jitter. That's
                    normally an incorrect field dominance setting. However, both your stills
                    and the movies from your camera are not interlaced so that shouldn't be an
                    issue.

                    Your movies are probably mjpeg. Some people do have problems with mjpeg
                    others don't. It's generally an issue of which mjpeg codec you have. Some
                    cameras implement mjpeg slightly differently and some codecs handle it
                    better than others. I've generally had no problems with the few mjpegs I've
                    had to deal with. It sounds like you were ok also at first, so that's not
                    likely to be the problem.

                    I'm not sure what's going on. What size did you set the camera to use for
                    the videos. And, which project preset did you use in premiere Elements.
                    One last question, what are you intending to export to as your finished
                    product and how are you producing it?

                    > I deleted all the render files for the project, and rendered it again,
                    > which took 4 hours to render the 5 minutes of video.... It still jumped
                    > and acted weird.
                    >

                    That long of a processing time says either your cpu is old and slow or you
                    are making Premiere Elements do a lot of (probably) unnecessary work.
                    Insufficient RAM can also slow down the work. The source material must be
                    scaled to fit the project frame and if the source is much different, the
                    processing is much more intensive and requires much more computer resources.
                    Using full size 12mb photos or 1280x720 movies in a standard definition
                    project can seriously slow down your processing or even cause a crash. You
                    are much better off pre-scaling your stills to match the project size and
                    using the right project preset for the intended usage.