3 Replies Latest reply on Feb 13, 2009 10:37 AM by (Arny_Krueger)

    Is hard drive file and folder compression lossy - Windows XP

      If I archive my projects from an uncompressed drive to one that has a NTFS format with File and Folder Compression enabled, will the compression process reduce the quality of the video? Obviously, I'd like to utilize the space on the archive hard drive as much as possible, but I do not want to lose any quality of my projects.
        • 1. Re: Is hard drive file and folder compression lossy - Windows XP
          New Improved Chuck Engels Level 1
          No, it will not harm the video but it will slow down your system. Recommendations by many video editors is to turn compression off.
          http://muvipix.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=40685#p40685

          It will also not compress video files much as they are already compressed. Just as zipping a video file will not reduce the size by very much at all.
          • 2. Re: Is hard drive file and folder compression lossy - Windows XP
            Level 1
            Got it! Quick and specif reply is always appreciated.
            • 3. Re: Is hard drive file and folder compression lossy - Windows XP
              Level 1
              <Raymond_Sanders@adobeforums.com> wrote in message<br />news:59b7cdcb.-1@webcrossing.la2eafNXanI<br /><br />> If I archive my projects from an uncompressed drive to<br />> one that has a NTFS format with File and Folder<br />> Compression enabled, will the compression process reduce<br />> the quality of the video?<br /><br />Nom, but it won't reduce the size of files significantly, either.<br /><br />> Obviously, I'd like to utilize<br />> the space on the archive hard drive as much as possible,<br />> but I do not want to lose any quality of my projects.<br /><br />NTFS compression is lossless compression. That means that writing and <br />reading via it will be bit-perfect. Look at it this way, if even one bit of <br />an executable  program's .EXE file gets changed, the whole program can fail.<br /><br />NTFS file compression trades CPU cycles for disk space.  If the file being <br />written is essentially uncompressible, then you lose the CPU cycles and get <br />no space back in return. IOW, you lost all those CPU cycles for nothing.<br /><br />Video files tend to be rather uncompressible because they are already <br />compressed. Even DV-AVI files are compressed pretty signficantly.<br /><br />I made a compressed folder and then copied 3 files to it.  I checked their <br />individual file properties made sure that their compressed flag was on in <br />advanced properties. The AVI and MPG files were only a tiny bit smaller, but <br />the text file shrunk by about 60%.<br /><br />The AVI file was 14.8 MB (15,613,870 bytes) uncompressed, and 14.6 MB <br />(15,376,384 bytes) compressed. That's less than a 2% improvement.