5 Replies Latest reply on Apr 2, 2009 7:07 AM by (Arny_Krueger)

    Removing a Piece of Audio

      Hi Guys,

      We recently did an interview video and I am currently in the process of editing the video in Adobe Premier 7.

      Now the problem I am having is, there are two occasions where the person behind the camera can be heard laughing loudly during the interview.

      Can anyone suggest the best and simple way to handle this? And the steps involved to do that. Your advise would be much appreciated.

      Thanks.
        • 1. Re: Removing a Piece of Audio
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional
          If he's laughing when the people on camera aren't talking, it's easy to edit him out.

          If he can be heard laughing as you are talking and you can't just cut the segment, there's probably no way to filter him out without losing the audio you want to keep.
          • 2. Re: Removing a Piece of Audio
            Level 1
            Yea, actually the people on camera are talking but that little bit is not too important. It is better for me to remove that one second of audio at the short segment, then to cut that bit of video as it will ruin the flow of the interview.

            What would be the best way to go about this? I am not very familiar with chopping audio. I looked at the Premier Elements manual, and it was not very helpful.
            • 3. Re: Removing a Piece of Audio
              Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional
              My book would tell you exactly how to do it, Seth! ;)

              Actually, the easiest way to do it is to move the CTI (the playhead) on the timeline to just before you want to remove the audio and then click on the scissors icon on the monitor to slice the clip (both the audio and video); the move the CTI to just after where you want to remove the audio and slice again.

              Then select the segment between the cuts, right-click on it and select Delete Audio.
              • 4. Re: Removing a Piece of Audio
                Level 1
                Cheers Mate. That works.

                Thanks.
                • 5. Re: Removing a Piece of Audio
                  Level 1
                  <Seth_Gill@adobeforums.com> wrote in message<br />news:59b877a1.-1@webcrossing.la2eafNXanI<br />> Hi Guys,<br />><br />> We recently did an interview video and I am currently in<br />> the process of editing the video in Adobe Premier 7.<br />><br />> Now the problem I am having is, there are two occasions<br />> where the person behind the camera can be heard laughing<br />> loudly during the interview.<br />><br />> Can anyone suggest the best and simple way to handle<br />> this? And the steps involved to do that. Your advise<br />> would be much appreciated.<br /><br />My advice is that you read up about keyframing, and then take advantage of <br />the fact that you can use keyframing to modulate the audio track's volume, <br />or even completely mute it.<br /><br />-----------<br /><br />If you are keyframing audio volume, it can be  helpful to enlarge the track <br />as large as possible by right-clicking the track name at the left of the <br />timeline.<br /><br />Select the audio portion of the relevant A/V track.<br /><br />First move the cursor to the beginning of the clip. Then right click the <br />body of the clip and select properties.<br /><br />One of the properties of an audio track is volume.  At the right of the word <br />"volume" in the properties window is an icon. Click it.<br /><br />Open the volume property window by clicking the left arrow at the right.<br /><br />Move the cursor to the last frame of the clip by scanning right to the <br />beginning of the next clip and backing off 1 frame. Click the icon at the <br />right of the words "clip volume".<br /><br />Now move the cursor to the beginning of the audio you wish to mute.  Again <br />click the icon at the right of the words "clip volume".<br /><br />Back up one frame and click the icon once again.<br /><br />Now move the cursor to the end of the audio you wish to mute.  Again click <br />the icon at the right of the words "clip volume".<br /><br />Step forward one frame and click the once icon again.<br /><br />Now select each of the two inner keyframes and set each one's volume to <br />minimum.<br /><br />If you wish to do additional modulation you can add more keyframes. You can <br />edit the keyframes by clicking and dragging points along the line that runs <br />horizontally through the audio track.  You can drag the points horizontally <br />to change the timing and vertically to change the volume.<br /><br />--------------<br /><br />A quick and dirty, but less flexible alternative is to simply cut the clip <br />along the boundaries of the noise you wish to eliminate, and then mute the <br />new short clip by right-clicking and disabling it.<br /><br />The last time I did something sorta different  with keyframing was when I <br />was building a video of Moses on Mount Sinai. I wanted a realistic wind <br />effect. I obtained one by downloading a free sound effect .wav file off the <br />web, and editing and repeating it to create the sound of a steady high wind. <br />I then keyframed its volume more or less randomly, to make it sound far more <br />realistic.<br /><br />This same technique can be used to duck musical tracks around intermittent <br />dialog.