9 Replies Latest reply on Mar 21, 2010 7:00 AM by Impulse Fire

    Nehalem AE Benchmarks?

    Navarro Parker Level 3
      Anyone been able to get a new MacPro or PC with the new Nehalem Xeon? In Mac OS X, the OS sees each hyperthreaded core, so an 8-core machine would have 16 virtual cores. Does this mean AE would launch (gulp) 16 background renderers?? Would I need 48GB of RAM?? O_o
        • 1. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
          Mylenium Most Valuable Participant
          >Does this mean AE would launch (gulp) 16 background renderers?

          No. It only launches 1+7. The virtual cores do show up in the process manager, but not to applications. Someone reported this, but I don't remember where I read it.

          >Would I need 48GB of RAM?

          The maximum supported memory in a MacPro is still limited to 32GB (8x4GB modules), so it's a moot point.

          Mylenium
          • 2. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
            Navarro Parker Level 3

            Just upgraded to a "new" Mac Pro last week.  In the multiprocessing prefs, it's telling me I have 16 processors.  Not sure how I should set it up. Should I only give AE 8-cores?

            • 3. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
              Todd_Kopriva Level 8

              In After Effects CS4, Render Multiple Frames Simultaneously multiprocessing only sees and uses the physical cores, not the virtual cores "created" by hyperthreading.

              • 4. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
                Navarro Parker Level 3

                Hey Todd. It seems my AE *is* seeing the HT cores as two cores.

                 

                Is my AE is reporting erroneously? Should I should set "CPUs to leave for other applications" at 8? Color me corn-fused.

                Screen shot 2010-02-28 at 6.18.03 PM.png

                Screen shot 2010-02-28 at 6.18.08 PM.png

                • 5. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
                  Todd_Kopriva Level 8

                  I told you what After Effects CS4 would use for Render Multiple Frames Simultaneously---just the 8 real cores. The others are irrelevant to Render Multiple Frames Simultaneously multiprocessing.

                   

                  That's a roundabout way of saying that the code and UI for reporting the number of processors is misleading at best and buggy at worst.

                  • 6. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
                    Navarro Parker Level 3

                    Okay, just so I'm clear, since AE is reporting 16 "CPUs", I should set the "CPUs to leave for other applications" to 8?

                    • 7. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
                      Navarro Parker Level 3

                      Here's my incredibly crappy performance when set to use 10 CPUs (Leave CPUs for other applications: 6)

                       

                      Screen shot 2010-03-19 at 3.13.18 PM.png

                       

                      Performance when set to use 4 CPUs (Leave CPUs for other applications: 12)

                       

                      Starts off great.... then goes to pot

                      Screen shot 2010-03-19 at 3.19.06 PM.png

                      About two minutes later...

                      Screen shot 2010-03-19 at 3.19.38 PM.png

                      • 8. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
                        ChrisProsser Adobe Employee

                        Try increasing the amount of memory to leave for other applications.

                         

                        -c

                        • 9. Re: Nehalem AE Benchmarks?
                          Impulse Fire Level 1

                          heres something you could try, see if reducing the amount of RAM reduces performance, if so, use all 32 gigs, since nehalem CPU's are 4 cores a peice a total of 8 Cores will use 16GB of ram. Hyperthreading IS NOT cores. Hyperthreading is a core taking in 2 sets of data, so like a 4 core cpu with 2 threads a core gives you 8 virtual cores, but has no effect on RAM usage, its still 4 physical cores, but with 2 threads working towards one goal.

                          Applications see the cpu as 2x the original because its using those to send the data. so AE is seeing 16 cores because it has 16 outputs of data, BUT those threads go only to 1 core which in return send back data through the 2 threads with the power of one core. so think of it like this.

                          1 boss has 2 workers, the workers bring him work to do, but he can only do the work that he normally can. The workers bring him the data in smaller amounts so its less load, but in the end its the same outcome, perhaps faster than if he had one worker