1 Reply Latest reply on Sep 4, 2008 7:37 AM by Newsgroup_User

    Prevent decompilation?

    SteveH59 Level 1
      Hello

      Is there a way, once the movie file and its associated HTML page are 'live' (togehter with any external files and server-scripts), to prevent visitors from downloading/decompiling your files?

      Thanks

      Steve
        • 1. Re: Prevent decompilation?
          Level 7
          SteveH59,

          > Is there a way, once the movie file and its associated HTML
          > page are 'live' (togehter with any external files and server-scripts),
          > to prevent visitors from downloading/decompiling your files?

          If users couldn't download your files, they wouldn't be able to view
          them! SWFs are requested via HTTP, just like the HTML documents that
          contain them. Like JPGs, GIFs, CSS files, JavaScript files, and so on,
          these files are downloaded to the user's hard drive (temporary Internet
          files, aka browser cache), and the browser uses the HTML to lay out those
          assets as the Web designer intended, ultimately displaying them to you from
          your own hard drive.

          The exception to this rule of thumb is streamed files, which often occur
          for video and audio. Flash supports this through its own protocol, RTMP,
          but to use that, you have to install Adobe's Flash Media Server on your Web
          server. Otherwise, you're dealing with HTTP.

          As for anti-decompilers ... there are a number of obfuscators on the
          Web, and there are workflows that make it harder for a thief to take your
          stuff. Tricks include splitting up your content among numerous SWFs,
          putting your sensitive code (as possible) on the server (PHP, Ruby on Rails,
          etc.) rather than in the SWF itself. These are deterrents, of course, but
          in the end, there is no way to ensure that a SWF cannot be decompiled. The
          same thing goes for files created for other platforms, including Java, .NET,
          you name it. This is part of why even industrial strength apps, like Flash
          itself, have EULAs. ;)


          David Stiller
          Adobe Community Expert
          Dev blog, http://www.quip.net/blog/
          "Luck is the residue of good design."