5 Replies Latest reply on Apr 19, 2009 10:56 AM by windowman

    premiere pro or encore?

      hi all-some advise needed.

      I want to make the best quality professional wedding dvd for a client nd I have a few options and i just want to get feedback on which is the best method.

      pc=win xp, prem pro 2 and encore 1.5, PAL, 4x3 plenty of hard disk space, 2gb RAM

       

      wedding is 2 hour long but am I splitting in 2 to get the best quality

       

      I think have 3 options-which is the best?

      Option 1 build the DVD in premiere pro via DVD layout (nice wedding menus as well)

      Option 2 export the encoded wedding via the encoder (media concept i think) and then just import and build the menus and dvd in encore

      Option 3 export an uncompressed avi file via file-movie-export into encore and let encore do the encoding and build the dvd.

       

      What do you guys think? Am i missing any other better options?

       

      I would really aprreciate any advise or criticism,

       

      (apologies for posting this in another area)

      thanks

      Paul

        • 1. Re: premiere pro or encore?
          Jim_Simon Level 8

          Option 4: Export out a DV file via File>Export>Movie...  Bring that into a dual-layer Encore project and let it transcode.

          • 2. Re: premiere pro or encore?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            I like Option #3 and #4 (Jim's). Two hours of good video should Transcode to good quality on a DVD-5. It will be a bit better on a DVD-9, so long as your clients' machines can handle these (most can nowadays). If you do not have a bunch of Audio streams, ROM content or Subtitles, you should be fine. One consideration might be to Export the Audio as Dolby Digital AC3, instead of PCM/WAV, as this will allow a bit more room for the Video. I find that Encore works perfectly with elemental streams (single DV-AVI Type II video only, and either PCM/WAV, or AC3 audio only). Muxed files *can* cause some problems on occasions.

             

            Good luck, and please report if you see any problems with the 2 hr. Duration on a DVD-5. I doubt that you will, unless you study the footage very critically. If you do, then Jim has nailed it with the DVD-9.

             

            Hunt

             

            PS, you can use the Menus from PrPro in Encore, as they are but .PSD files. I'm not sure if they are different than the Wedding Menus in Encore, but if they are, I'd just copy them over into the Wedding sub-folder in Encore, so they will appear in your Library. Otherwise, just Import_As_Menu and navigate to the proper Menu in the PrPro "library" folder.

            • 3. Re: premiere pro or encore?
              Jim_Simon Level 8
              One consideration might be to Export the Audio as Dolby Digital AC3, instead of PCM/WAV, as this will allow a bit more room for the Video.

               

              Encore will automatically transcode PCM audio to DD before burning, so this is not an issue.

              • 4. Re: premiere pro or encore?
                Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                If you want the best results, you do your encoding in Premiere (no intermediate file needed) and your authoring in Encore.

                You can either use a bitrate calculator or use the settings in the attached file.

                • 5. Re: premiere pro or encore?
                  windowman Level 1

                  None of the above. If you have to worry about a measly 2-hr video looking worse on a standard 4.7GB than it does on a dual layer DVD then your encoder must not be very good. One more reason to stay away from Encore.

                   

                  Two options:

                   

                  1) Buy a better encoder like TMPGEnc.

                   

                  2) Export with the highest settings in whatever mpg encoder you're using now and use the free DVDShrink to take it down to fit a 4.7GB DVD.

                   

                  Both TMPGEnc and DVDShrink can fit close to 4-hrs of video on a 4.7GB DVD with almost no perceptable loss of quality.