8 Replies Latest reply on Apr 25, 2009 10:56 AM by vemina39

    Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)

      Hi,

       

      My monitor is calibrated with Spyder3. I have set up my Photoshop CS3 so that the color management policies are disabled and the proof conditions are set up to the .icc profile produces by the calibrator. With these settings the files that I save in Photoshop look similar in Photoshop, Microsoft Office Picture Manager, IE and on paper.

       

      But if I decide to open a RAW file, then it is opened in ACR and looks very different: all colors are over-saturated and totally unnatural. Nevertheless, clicking on "Save Image" without changing anything produces a jpeg, which, if opened in Photoshop, looks fine.

       

      I played with this jpeg in Photoshop and was able to reproduce those unnatural colors of ACR in the following way:

      - Go to Save For Web&Devices

      - Open the Preview Menu

      - Chose Windows Color

      Normally I have Uncompensated Color chosen there and then it looks normal.

       

      Here are the examples. First, how the file looks in ACR ad then in PS:

      Untitled-1.jpgUntitled-11.jpg

      Does anybody know why this might happen?

       

      Thank you very much,

      Vera

        • 1. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
          Ramón G Castañeda Level 4

          vemina39 wrote:

           

          Hi,

           

          My monitor is calibrated with Spyder3. I have set up my Photoshop CS3 so that the color management policies are disabled and the proof conditions are set up to the .icc profile produces by the calibrator.

           

           

          Oy!

           

          A recipe for disaster!  Please listen to D. Fosse above.

          • 2. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
            Ramón G Castañeda Level 4

            Start learning about color management here:

             

            http://www.gballard.net/psd/cmstheory.html

             

            Though it's written with the Mac in mind, the process is the same for PCs.  It's written in easy to understand layman's terms.

            • 3. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
              Level 1

              Thank you Ramon,

               

              Could you please elaborate? I have looked through the page you gave me a link to. I did not see much new there.

               

              The problem I have is with proofing. If I switch to sRGB I have consistent colors through all my applications but they look very washed out and way too cold. If I then make my picture look "natural" (whatever that means) on my screen, it looks too saturated and too warm on most of other screens I tried. (And on paper too.)

               

              Proofing under my .icc does not give that problem, but it has the other: ACR and Photoshop proof differently. So I cannot use ACR for conversion and have to use the Canon's software, which (I suppose) uses the monitor profile for proofing.

               

              Are you OYing about the fact that I do not convert the profile of my pictures before sending them to the printer?

               

              Vera

              • 4. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
                Ramón G Castañeda Level 4

                vemina39 wrote:

                 

                Thank you Ramon,

                 

                Could you please elaborate? I have looked through the page you gave me a link to. I did not see much new there.

                 

                The problem I have is with proofing. If I switch to sRGB I have consistent colors through all my applications but they look very washed out and way too cold. If I then make my picture look "natural" (whatever that means) on my screen, it looks too saturated and too warm on most of other screens I tried. (And on paper too.)

                 

                Proofing under my .icc does not give that problem, but it has the other: ACR and Photoshop proof differently. So I cannot use ACR for conversion and have to use the Canon's software, which (I suppose) uses the monitor profile for proofing.

                 

                Are you OYing about the fact that I do not convert the profile of my pictures before sending them to the printer?

                 

                Vera

                 

                 

                Vera,

                 

                If G. Ballard's excellent, clearly written pages did not help you, you can bet I won't be able to either. 

                 

                No, I was saying OY! about your entire post! 

                 

                Good grief! you're turning off Color Management in Photoshop (or you think you are, but you're not "turning it off", you're just messing it up) and you're massively misusing your monitor profile.

                 

                Honestly I don't have the time, strength or inclination to explain it to you step-by-step.

                 

                CAUTIONNEVER, ever set your working space to be your monitor profile!

                 

                In very broad strokes:

                 

                Calibrate and profile your monitor, use the resulting profile ONLY in your OS and nowhere else, not anywhere in Photoshop. Set your working profile to a device-independent profile such as ProPhoto RGB, Adobe RGB or sRGB, embed the same device-independent profile such as ProPhoto RGB, Adobe RGB or sRGB, in your file (that is called "tagging your file"), work with your file and save it.

                 

                 

                Then, for the web, Convert a copy the file to sRGB if it's not already tagged as sRGB, then soft proof (Proof) the file with the sRGB profile to see how other people who happen to have a calibrated monitor (less than 2% of all web viewers) will see it in a color managed application.

                 

                For heaven's sake DO NOT soft-proof with your gosh-darned monitor profile!!!   You're just fooling yourself that way.  No one else in the entire world will see the image the same way except by sheer serendipity.

                 

                —What kind of printer are you using?  Are you talking about your own inkjet printer or a commercial printing press?

                 

                • If your own printer, then your file should be created in an Adobe RGB working color space (you can move up to an even wider space once you know what you are doing), tag your file with the embedded Adobe RGB profile, and then use your TARGET (paper) profile to soft-proof your image.  The Target Profile, also called paper profile, MUST be specific to a particular combination of paper/ink/printer.

                 

                • If a commercial press, ask them to provide their own profiles for their print presses or devices so you can use it for soft proofing.

                 

                In both of these last two cases, use the paper target profile for soft proofing. NEVER your gosh-darned monitor profile!

                 

                Again:  If G. Ballard's excellent, clearly written pages did not help you, you can bet I won't be able to either.  I'm done here.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
                  Bill_Janes Level 2

                  The problem I have is with proofing. If I switch to sRGB I have consistent colors through all my applications but they look very washed out and way too cold. If I then make my picture look "natural" (whatever that means) on my screen, it looks too saturated and too warm on most of other screens I tried. (And on paper too.)

                   

                  Needless to point out, if you want color to display properly on screen you should use color managed applications. Many apps such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, Microsoft Word, etc are not color managed and assume sRGB. See this post by Mr. Ballard.

                   

                  http://www.gballard.net/psd/colorlooksbad.html

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
                    Level 1

                    Thank you very much for your time Ramon,

                     

                    I will go through G. Ballard's pages again.

                    • 7. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
                      Level 1

                      Thank you Bill, I'll go through it.

                      • 8. Re: Color Profile and ACR 4.6 (Vista)
                        Level 1

                        Thanks very much once again. That link has helped me quite a lot.

                        My monitor is wide gamut. That is why it behaves in this way.