12 Replies Latest reply on May 5, 2009 4:08 PM by Todd_Kopriva

    A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...

    dansch37 Level 2

      Ok, so lets say there is no video footage at all. The whole animation will be shapes directly created in After Effects. I DO know to use square pixels.

       

      Questions:

      1) DO I have to still stay in 1920x1080 or 1280x720 even though the whole thing is created from scratch? Im pretty sure the answer is yes here, just want to confirm.

       

      2) Now, I understand the whole 8 16 and 32 bit hdr color thing - or at least how to do it and how to use 32bit effects etc. So my question is: Is THAT what makes an animation without video "HD"? or next question...

       

      3) Is "HDR" basically "HD" or is it just brighter/saturated colors that fake an HD look?

       

      3) Will the edges of shapes in a project at 1920x1080 or 1280x720 in 32bit color be super sharp and crisp and impressive - and enough to call HD?

       

      4) Frame rate is 24fps for posting an HD video on the web. Im pretty sure the answer is yes here, just want to confirm.

        • 1. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
          TimeRemapper Level 4

          1) If you want to stay in an HD Frame, Yes.

           

          2) HD (High Definition) has nothing to do with the color bit-depth. They are unrelated. HD is HD because of the frame size.

           

          3) HDR = High Dynamic Range. This refers to 32-bit color. Unrelated to HD frame sizes.

           

          4) 24fps would be fine. You could also post a sample with other framerates that are used by HD.

          • 2. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
            dansch37 Level 2

            So without any video footage whatsoever, can After Effects simply produce graphic shapes/animations in HD?

            • 4. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
              dansch37 Level 2

              1) So then the ONLY things that makes HD in AE are:

              A) Having the correct dimensions.

              B) Rendering it properly.

               

              2) So I can do all the flying spinning logos and boxes and wild glowing bursts in 8bit and it will still be "HD"?


              3) Is the following satement true?: The 32 bit thing has nothing to do with HD however without it your animations will not be as powerful as the color will be flat and since most HD animations are done in 32bit, to appear HD, one should probably strive to work in 32bit.

               

              I hate to keep asking things that MAY be slightly redundant, I just want to make sure that I know what I am talking about, so thanks for your patience!

              • 5. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                Todd_Kopriva Level 8

                HD (high-definition) means one thing and one thing only: greater pixel dimensions than SD (standard-definition).

                 

                That's all.

                 

                I was in a pub a couple of years ago, thumbing through an old book about television, and it referred to a television with only a couple hundred scan lines as "high defintion". No kidding.

                 

                These days, the tallest "standard-definition" format is PAL, with 576 pixels of vertical resolution. So, anything taller than that is HD.

                 

                That means that virtually all computer monitors are HD.

                 

                Now, all that said, there are many specific HD standards that do in fact define color spaces and things. For example, the Rec. 709 HDTV specification defines not only pixel dimensions but also colors.

                 

                See the "About high-definition video" section of After Effects Help for more information.

                 

                You can get lots of benefits from working in high-dynamic-range, 32-bpc color, but those benefits are really not related to whether the footage or output is for HD frame sizes. These are totally separate concerns.

                • 6. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                  ginos69

                  I am having problem with the plugin installation on cs4. plugins like panopticum, revisionfx. advantedge. anyoneone know how to install those plugins on cs4 in a intel macos leopard please? i tried everything but after effects doesnt recognize those effects. when i installed first time, it was installed on my HD. then i opened after effects, there was nothing. then i transfered to mediacore, in the plug-ins directory, but nothing. please help.

                  • 7. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                    dansch37 Level 2

                    that being said...

                     

                    1) What makes the edges of animated shapes (spinning logos etc) on HDTV soooo crisp?.....The rendering/output choices and codecs...TRUE?

                     

                    2) And what makes the color sooooo bright and exciting on HDTV is NOT the fact that it's HD, but the fact that the artist worked in HDR 32bit color...TRUE?

                     

                    3) Combined is what the general public (or maybe just me before I started all this research) is perceiving as HD even though its only the one thing?...TRUE?

                    • 8. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                      yenaphe Level 4

                      What makes the edges of animated shapes (spinning logos etc) on HDTV soooo crisp?.....The rendering/output choices and codecs...TRUE?

                       

                      This is true. HD is about 4 time the SD resolution, so you have 4 time more pixels to play with. That why HD looks so crisp.

                       

                      And what makes the color sooooo bright and exciting on HDTV is NOT the fact that it's HD, but the fact that the artist worked in HDR 32bit color...TRUE?

                       

                      This is mostly true. As HD have more pixels, and as the most used HD codec for broadcast (and BluRay) is way better than the one used before (h264 vs Mpeg2), the color is defacto better rendered. But, more and more CGI and Motion graphics are now in 32bit, so that also adds it. But, remember that when in 32bit mode, all the pixel calculation are in 32bit, but most of time your delivery codec (for exemple h264) will be 8bit. So for exemple, a BluRay is 8bit. But as the color calculations have been made in 32bit before being down converted to 8bit, you still see the improvement.

                       

                      Combined is what the general public (or maybe just me before I started all this research) is perceiving as HD even though its only the one thing?...TRUE?

                       

                      Well yes and no. First of all what first strike with HD is the quality. This quality is of course because of the 4xTime bigger resolution, but also because the compression codec for final delivery is much more efficient. Also, with an HDTV, looking at SD poorly upscalled and then switching to HD also plays a part. But ultimately yes, for us designers, directors, editors, artists, etc... the only thing that makes something HD is the resolution.

                      • 9. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                        dansch37 Level 2

                        Since Todd said that its only the size that makes HD, i'm assuming when you say that HDs resolution is 4x higher, all that is going on behind the scenes when one renders out to an HD format.

                         

                        I don't have to set resolution in my project anywhere while im working in AE...TRUE?

                         

                         

                         

                        • 10. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                          yenaphe Level 4

                          Well 1920x1080 is about 4x 720x480 (that's what i was saying, nothing behind the scene or fancy here). HD is just about the size.

                           

                          When you create a composition, you have to select it's size. So if you want to create an HD composition inside AE, you will have to specify it's resolution to be 1920*1080 (or 1280*720). To check your composition resolution when you are in your timeline panel, press ctrl-k (or cmd-k if on a mac) to open your composition properties.

                          • 11. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                            Todd_Kopriva Level 8

                            > Since Todd said that its only the size that makes HD, i'm assuming when you say that HDs resolution is 4x higher, all that is going on behind the scenes when one renders out to an HD format.

                             

                            > I don't have to set resolution in my project anywhere while im working in AE...TRUE?

                             

                            We're talking about the same thing. We're both talking about the number of pixels in the image. Some people use the term "resolution" to refer to the number of pixels in an image. Technically, resolution is the number of pixels per linear measure, but that's splitting hairs.

                             

                            An HD frame that is twice as wide and twice as high has 4 times the number of pixels.

                             

                            You set the image size (pixel dimensions) in the Composition Settings dialog box. You should be able to just use a preset for most things.

                             

                            When we use the term 'resolution' in the After Effects interface, we use it in a pretty strict sense. (See "Resolution".)

                            • 12. Re: A couple of more good questions regarding HD in AE...
                              dansch37 Level 2

                              Ok, I think that answers all of my questions. I can't thank you guys enough!

                               

                              For others reading this - from Sebastians link: "In video, film, and computer graphics contexts, the linear measurements of the images are variable, so it doesn’t make sense to refer to the number of pixels per inch or any other linear measure."