21 Replies Latest reply on May 29, 2009 9:39 AM by emhuang

    How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies

    AdobeRLiars Level 1

      Adobe is, in my opinion, intentionally deceptive on a number of levels about the privacy-invading cookies that Flash stores on your machine. These are NOT the cookies that get deleted when you clear your browser cache. These cookies remain on your machine until you MANUALLY DELETE THEM. And Adobe know that most users are not technically proficient enough to even find where they exist.There is a good site that describes how to get rid of them here:

       

      http://www.ghacks.net/2008/07/30/delete-flash-cookies/

       

      The Flash cookies:

      • Stay on your computer for an unlimited amount of time
      • Store 100 kb of data by default, with an unlimited max
      • Can’t be deleted by your browser
      • Send previous visit information and history, by default, without your permission

       

      This type of cookie exists on 98% of global computers, across all operating systems. it’s the Adobe Flash Player.

       

      The news about these cookies needs to be spread far and wide.

       

      Furthermore, the lame website that Adobe provides seems intentionally designed to make you THINK that you are deleting these cookies, when in fact the folders in which they are contained - which list EVERY WEBSITE YOU EVER VISITED THAT USED FLASH - remain on your machine. Moreover, when you clear your private data from your browser, THE FLASH SETTINGS ARE RESET AGAIN TO THE PRIVACY-INVADING DEFAULTS, AND THE COOKIES WILL CONTINUE TO COME IN. I believe that Adobe is being intentionally and criminally deceptive about the privacy-invading nature of what they, in conjunction with the companies they obviously have some kind of arrangement with, are putting on your computer.

       

      To get rid of Adobe's deceptive privacy-invading cookies, go to the following locations on your machine, and MANUALLY DELETE THEM. It is the ONLY way to get rid of the privacy-invading TRASH that Adobe puts on your machine, without your knowledge or permission:

       

      • Windows: LSO files are stored typically with a “.SOL” extension, within each user’s Application Data directory, under Macromedia\Flash Player\#SharedObjects.
      • Mac OS X: For Web sites, ~/Library/Preferences/Macromedia/Flash Player. For AIR Applications, ~/Library/Preferences/[package name (ID) of your app].
      • GNU-Linux: ~/.macromedia

       

      But wait - there's more! Adobe goes one step farther - there is yet ANOTHER folder where YOUR ENTIRE BROWSING HISTORY OF WEBSITES THAT USED FLASH is stored:

       

      On Mac OSX, to finally get rid of all the web history tracking that Adobe does, you must also go to the following location:

       

      ~/Library/Preferences/Macromedia/Flash Player/macromedia.com/Support/flashplayer/sys

       

      For Windows:

       

      Application Data (hidden file - be sure to turn on hidden files and folders in Windows to see it)/macromedia.com/Support/flashplayer/sys

       

      There you will find YET AGAIN, another complete list of all the sites you visited, and all the time you wasted dicking around with Adobe's fake "settings manager" thing will not make a single bit of difference.

       

      This is not the first time Adobe has been busted installing, without user knowledge or permission, spyware, and other items that "phone home", for example, Photoshop, Dreamweaver. etc. They both phone home to a very shady, in my opinion, company, using an INTENTIONALLY DECEPTIVE IP address that mimics a local network call. Just google "photoshop and spyware" to get the details.

       

      Personally, I will not ever be giving ONE PENNY of my money to this company ever again. At work, or at home, I am NEVER going to buy or download another application made by this totally, in my opinion, untrustworthy company. If you need to edit photos, without scumware and shady companies that want to track your online behavior, download the open source tool called GIMP. If you nee to read PDFs, there are loads of apps besides Adobe's reader that will do the same thing much better.

       

      I think these people belong in court to explain why they are so intentionally invading users' privacy. I hope someone starts a class-action suit against these dirtbags.

       

      To the apologists who will come here and try to say how wonderful it is that Adobe tracks your every move on the Internet: Go find someone who gives a damn about your moron brain-damaged alcoholic opinion.

        • 1. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
          Michael Borbor Level 4

          Those are not cookies are SharedObjects, any user can disable them, they're limited to 100Kb by default unless a user changes this limit.

          • 2. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
            AdobeRLiars Level 1

            Michael,

             

            Whatever they might be called within Adobe, isn't the far more important point that they TRACK AND KEEP A RECORD OF EVERY SINGLE WEBSITE YOU VISIT that contains Flash?

             

            Isn't it far more important that Adobe stores ALL YOUR WEB HISTORY, WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE OR PERMISSION in not one but TWO separate folders that 99% of users are unlikely to know about or be able to find?

             

            Isn't it far more important that when you waste your time with Adobe's "settings manager" that you think you've deleted them, but there are still folders, labelled in plain text, that show EVERY URL YOU EVER VISITED THAT HAD FLASH ON IT?

             

            I mean, that's nice that you've clarified what Adobe calls them, but aren't these other points of far more concern to most users?

            • 3. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
              AdobeRLiars Level 1

              And furthermore, isn't it far more important that when you waste your time with Adobe's "settings manager", change the settings to what you want them to be, that when you clear your browser's history and cache, that the SETTINGS ARE RETURNED TO THE PRIVACY-INVADING DEFAULTS without your knowledge or permission?

               

              Aren't all these points of far more concern to 99.9% of people victimized by this scam than the meagre and deceptively incomplete minor points that you took the time to mention?

              • 4. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                Michael Borbor Level 4

                I understand your concerns but they don't store info by default an application developer can use SharedObject for example to store the layout that a user set an app, or to store login info so this user doesn't have to login everytime he visits this page and so on. I don't know where you get this stuff that Adobe uses this to violate your privacy.

                • 5. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                  AdobeRLiars Level 1

                  And isn't it true, Michael, that while "any user can disable them" that Adobe will still create folders on your hard drive, even after you've "disabled" them, that clearly show your entire web browsing history, in plain text?

                   

                  Why do you mention these tiny little minor points when most users would probably want to know how to get Adobe's unwanted and unasked for surveillance of their web history off of their machine?

                  • 6. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                    AdobeRLiars Level 1

                    Michael,

                     

                    First of all, sentences end with periods, and the beginning letter of a new sentence starts with a capital letter. If you would practice this bit of punctuational courtesy, it would be a lot easier to understand where one of your sentences ends, and another begins.

                     

                    You are obviously presenting deceptively incomplete information to try and "divert the discourse" away from what is the main concern that most users have: They don't want sleazy marketing companies tracking their internet behavior, and creating marketing "profiles" on them, based on the cookies (yes COOKIES, I don't care what Adobe calls them) that Flash stores on their behalf, which is, by far, the main thing that shared objects are used for.

                     

                    I understand there are useful purposes for cookies. But if there is no opt-out behavior available, except for manually deleting them, I think that is a problem for most users.

                     

                    It is also a problem for most users that Flash will create folders, containing shared objects or not, that detail every single domain they ever visit that has Flash on it.

                     

                    It is also a problem for most users that there is no mechanism for deleting these folders except to MANUALLY dig through a bunch of hidden system files to get rid of them.

                     

                    Why are you trying to obfuscate these points with deceptively incomplete information? Do you work for Adobe?

                    • 7. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                      Michael Borbor Level 4

                      What's your name?

                       

                      This isn't a formal letter this is a user forum. I'm writting very little so I don't think my paragraphs are confusing, but thanks for the tip. I re-read my last post and I began a setence with a capital so probably I'm missing something there, but thanks for the tip.

                       

                      No I don't work for Adobe.

                       

                      I'm telling you what I know SharedObjects are intended for, so probably I don't know enough about it like you.

                       

                      Now that you mention courtesy, please a little netiquette will be nice.

                       

                      Could you point me to a source where do you get that Adobe uses this for tracking?

                      • 8. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                        AdobeRLiars Level 1

                        TO readers out there, don't be decieved by Michaels' attempt to make shared objects into all sweetness and light. When I mentioned "sleazy marketers", here is an example of what I mentioned. This guy's company uses shared objects to store Persistent Identification Elements (PIE) on your machine. This way, his sleazy (in my opinion) marketing company can create a comprehensive profile on who you are, where you live, what your travel plans are (if you visit a travel site), and almost anything else they could glean from your internet surfing habits (i.e., nearly everying).

                         

                        Michael would have you think though that shared objects are just to store your game settings.

                         

                        Company Bypasses Cookie-Deleting Consumers

                         

                        United Virtualities is offering online marketers technology that attempts to undermine the growing trend among consumers to delete cookies planted in their computers.




                        United Virtualities is offering online marketers and publishers technology that attempts to undermine the growing trend among consumers to delete cookies planted in their computers.

                        The New York company on Thursday unveiled what it calls PIE, or persistent identification element, a technology that's uploaded to a browser and restores deleted cookies. In addition, PIE, which can't be easily removed, can also act as a cookie backup, since it contains the same information.

                        Cookies are small files often uploaded to people's computers as they visit websites run by retailers, entertainment companies, newspapers and other businesses. The text files contain information that's used to track visitors' behavior, or to offer visitors products or services based on information gathered during previous visits, a process called personalization. In addition, cookie-gathered information is often pivotal for advertising campaigns and e-mail marketing.

                        According to JupiterResearch, a division of Jupitermedia Corp., 58 percent of Internet users have deleted the tiny files, essentially making many consumers anonymous during site visits. In addition, 39 percent of consumers are deleting cookies from their primary computer monthly.

                        United Virtualities's PIE helps combat this consumer behavior by leveraging a feature in Flash MX called local shared objects. Flash MX is a Macromedia Inc. application for developing multimedia Web content, user interfaces and Web applications. The technology runs on a Flash Player that the company says is deployed on 98 percent of Internet-capable computers.

                        When a consumer goes to a PIE-enabled website, the visitor's browser is tagged with a Flash object that contains a unique identification similar to the text found in a traditional cookie. In this way, PIE acts as a cookie backup, and can also restore the original cookie when the consumer revisits the site.

                        While consumers have learned to delete cookies, most are unaware of shared objects, and don't know how to disable them.

                        Mookie Tanembaum, founder and chief executive of United Virtualities, says the company is trying to help consumers by preventing them from deleting cookies that help website operators deliver better services.

                        "The user is not proficient enough in technology to know if the cookie is good or bad, or how it works," Tanembaum said.

                        While United Virtualities, as well as marketers and publishers, focus on the benefits of cookies, consumers often see them as an invasion of privacy and resent having them loaded into their computers without permission, experts say. In addition, unscrupulous marketers can abuse the tracking capabilities of cookies.

                        Fear is also a factor. Consumers are constantly reminded about the risks on the Internet posed by spyware, phishers and viruses, so deleting cookies makes them feel more secure, even though it's unlikely to make them safer.

                        Using technology like United Virtualities's to circumvent consumers could cause a backlash, JupiterResearch analyst David Schatsky said. The research firm found that many consumers understand cookies, and may be willing to allow some in their computers, if they are given the choice upfront.

                        "(PIE) sounds like it flies in the face of what consumers are telling us," Schatsky said. "They're seeking privacy and control, and if this is denied, then they won't be happy."

                        Tanembaum also warned against using PIE to thwart consumers.

                        "Any abuse of this technology is not welcomed by us," Tanembaum said. "We believe people should use this technology responsibly. If people don't want cookies in place, then (their browsers) shouldn't be tagged."

                        Consumers can make PIE inoperable by raising the security settings in their browsers to its highest level, Tanembaum said. But he acknowledges that such a high setting would also hamper consumers' ability to visit non-PIE websites.

                        For its part, Macromedia has posted on its website instructions for disabling shared objects uploaded to browsers.

                        In addition, the San Francisco-based company is discussing with Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT) Corp., the Mozilla Foundation and other browser makers the possibility of letting consumers control the use of cookies and shared objects from one location in a browser, Jeff Whatcott, vice president of product management for Macromedia, said.

                        "Our goal is to always put the user in control over their own data and machine," Whatcott said. "That's the approach we've always taken."

                        Flash-built websites often use shared objects in gathering information from visitors. Besides data on how the sites are being used, retailers, for example, can track what visitors place in their shopping carts, or store a list of previously purchased products.

                         

                        • 9. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                          AdobeRLiars Level 1

                          And I just want to highlight this particular paragraph. It is Adobe's deceptive practices that allow this to happen, because most people have gotten wise to deleting their cookies:

                           

                          "According to JupiterResearch, a division of Jupitermedia Corp., 58 percent of Internet users have deleted [their cookies], essentially making many consumers anonymous during site visits. In addition, 39 percent of consumers are deleting cookies from their primary computer monthly.

                           

                          United Virtualities's PIE helps combat this consumer behavior by leveraging a feature in Flash MX called local shared objects. Flash MX is a Macromedia Inc. application for developing multimedia Web content, user interfaces and Web applications. The technology runs on a Flash Player that the company says is deployed on 98 percent of Internet-capable computers.

                           

                          When a consumer goes to a PIE-enabled website, the visitor's browser is tagged with a Flash object that contains a unique identification similar to the text found in a traditional cookie. In this way, PIE acts as a cookie backup, and can also restore the original cookie when the consumer revisits the site.

                           

                          While consumers have learned to delete cookies, most are unaware of shared objects, and don't know how to disable them...."

                           

                          What they also don't probably know is that Adobe stores the name of EVERY SINGLE WEBSITE THAT THEY HAVE EVER VISITED that contains Flash, and that you cannot delete that history except by manually digging through hidden system files that 99% of people don't know anything about. And there is NOTHING either in the flash player, or in Adobe's bogus "settings manager" that changes that.

                          • 10. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                            Michael Borbor Level 4

                            Cool I'm liar . I see that you don't want to give your name , that's fishy.

                             

                            But anyway, as I told your concerns are right, you want your privacy. But that a company does something wrong that doesn't mean that Adobe is guilty.

                             

                            There are laws to protect your privacy.

                             

                            There are privacy agreements that people sign when they create user accounts. so that article shows that people must be more careful when accepting these conditions.

                             

                            Anyway have a good day.

                            • 11. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                              AdobeRLiars Level 1

                              Hey Mike, I don't reacall calling you a liar. I do see that you have a hard time forming complete sentences though, and I do see that you realize you are totally owned in this debate.

                               

                              Nice try.

                              • 12. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                Michael Borbor Level 4

                                This is not a contest, there aren't winners or losers here. This is a forum that is intended for people to help other people. As I told you I understand your concerns and I hope that you find a solution for them.

                                 

                                I love discussions that's why I took the time to answer you, but that's just useless.

                                 

                                Have a good day.

                                • 13. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                  AdobeRLiars Level 1

                                  It seemed you were trying to minimize those concerns. But I think my point has been made, and that other readers will find this information useful, if not of great interest to them.

                                   

                                  Thanks for your input.

                                  • 14. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                    Michael Borbor Level 4

                                    By the way that article is quite old, it's been I believe 5 years now since Adobe bought Macromedia, and Flash MX I believe was released around 02-03. I probably will look for an updated article about this.

                                     


                                    For all users that think SharedObjects are bad, to disable them do this:

                                     

                                    1. Right click on any flash player instance.
                                    2. Select configuration
                                    3. Select local storage
                                    4. Finally click on never and close.
                                    • 15. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                      AdobeRLiars Level 1

                                      Yes, you can "disable" the shared objects, but that will not stop Flash from storing EVERY SINGLE WEBSITE YOU HAVE EVER BEEN TO THAT HAD FLASH ON IT.

                                       

                                      Personally, I was a bit shocked to learn of this: I opened up the folders I mentioned, and nearly my entire web browsing history for the past 3 years was there, despite having deleted my cache, history and cookies in my browser hundreds of times. I think most other users will be shocked too.

                                       

                                      To delete all the surveillance files that Adobe see fit to store about you using Flash, detailing nearly every move you've ever made on the Internet, you will have to MANUALLY delete them according to the instructions I gave above.

                                       

                                      Futhermore, if you reset your browser and delete the history and cache (as almost everyone does now), Flash will return to its default privacy-invading settings, and it will continue monitoring tracking and recording nearly every single thing you do on the internet, and you will have to return to Adobe's "settings manager" page to reset it all over again.

                                      • 16. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                        AdobeRLiars Level 1

                                        The bottom line is that Flash is one of the most pernicious privacy-invading pieces of software ever created, and Adobe knows this.

                                        • 17. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                          AdobeRLiars Level 1

                                          Also, I disabled the Flash player, and found that my net surfing is a lot better now. About the only thing Flash is used for are lame ads, and now they don't show up. As a result, my surfing to flash-using sites like weather.com is a lot faster.

                                           

                                          NOTE: Using Adobe's Flash Uninstaller DOES NOT delete all the privacy-invading Flash cookies on your machine. Furthermore, unless you MANUALLY DELETE the folders I mentioned in the original post AFTER running Adobe's bogus "uninstaller", surfing to Flash enabled sites will STILL put Adobe's intentionally privacy-invading cookies on your machine!

                                           

                                          The ONLY way to get Adobe's nefarious surveillance crap that you didn't want and didn't ask for off your machine is to MANUALLY DELETE the folders I mentioned above, AFTER running adobe's so-called "uninstaller".

                                           

                                          All I can say at this point is that, in my opinion, the people who run Adobe are untrustworthy, sneaky, and quite frankly, kind of sleazy. As I mentioned, this is not the first time Adobe has been busted installing spyware (google "photoshop and spyware" for more information).

                                           

                                          This is however THE VERY LAST TIME I ever install an Adobe application on my machine. These people will NEVER get one single penny of my money ever again. I have serious doubts too about keeping CS3 installed on my machine. There are lots of open source (i.e., FREE) alternatives to Adobe's apps. The era of proprietary software companies, especially sleazy ones who like to install spyware on your machine that is very difficult to get rid of, is coming to an end.

                                           

                                          Bye bye Adobe.

                                          • 18. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                            MyDogIsBart

                                            AdobeRLiars is quite right Michael. He's very passionate about this and I can understand why - it's a complete and utter invasion of privacy happening right underneath our noses with the majority of those affected not even knowing about it and all the implications associated with it.

                                             

                                            Let's break this down: Forget SOL's for a minute - kinda funny name too isn't it - also stands for $hit out of luck. Let's just imagine for a minute that you are maybe like me... you read privacy policies thoroughly before downloading and installing new products to ensure it's safe for your computer, that no harm will come to your computer's ability to function as it should nor will anything undesireable, specifically anything you don't want to occur, will happen that may impact you in anyway - think as broad as you possibly can. You practice "safer" web browsing practices. Like for instance, me, I personally do not delete every single standard browser cookie that ends up sandboxed in my Firefox profile, but I do go through and prune away the ones that are less than benevolent in their presence on my machine. I block all of the advertising websites completely for storing standard cookies on my machine; in fact, I manage my cookie list so carefully that I seemed to have blocked every single major advertising company successfully because I no longer have a billion cookies left after a session - if you pay attention, you'll notice that most browser cookies are advertising related. I usually delete cookies left behind by websites I only visit once as there is no purpose for it to remain, either good or bad, if I am not to return. I will frequently sign in and out of Google deleting the cookies in between as they are notoroious for tracking web movement. Luckily Firefox has a little box, you just type google and all the associated cookies for google come up and I just delete them all. Having to sign in and out and fill in my password and what not is hardly an inconvenience when it comes to dealing with Google. It took me a few years to even warm up to them and using their features at all because without a doubt in mind, not all is right at Google when it comes to privacy protection. Do you know what data mining is? Do you wonder how Google can afford to implement all of these free services and applications they offer. It's because of the gignormaous amount of advertising revenue they generate every year from an unfathomable volume of sales. The dollar amounts make your head spin. Why do they sell so much advertising? Well, the answer is, so boldly on Google's part, right in your face everytime you use Gmail: the ads presented alongside your Gmail are directly related to the content of your email. This is about as directly targeted as you are going to get with advertising. Oh advertisers are jumping with glee! Its as if they are almost delivering a personalized advertisment for that very person reading their email. And that's what advertising is all about when it's successful - reaching your intended audience and speaking to them directly. Google says the process of serving ads in your email that are relevant to the email's content is all automated; your email is not seen by a human being or distributed in any personally indentifiable way. You just have to TRUST Google on this. Right. Google engineers some revolutionary ad server that scans email automatically... wow... I bet someone QA'ed that. Like a human being. Google wouldn't be able to know if the process was working correctly if some human did not QA it (quality check).

                                             

                                            Sorry - that's my Google rant, I'll have to go over and post this on their site as well (Google too stores SOLs on your computer.)

                                             

                                            So imagine one day after all this care in navigating the internet you find these strange files and you have no idea how they got there or what they are for. Now, this is commonstance in Windows - I pity the average consumer saddled with a Windows running machine - there are several websites devoted to demystifying what all the extensions stand for. And there are hundreds. Well I have a Mac. And I also have a Linux box. So I know what files belong on my Mac and what they do; I also have a broad knowledge thanks to Linux of the Unix foundation under the Mac OS so I know when I check my invisible files what should be there and what shouldn't.

                                             

                                            What sort of conclusion do you come to? Technically, this is what is called ""Privacy-invasive software... a category of computer software that ignores users’ privacy and that is distributed with a specific intent, often of a commercial nature. Three typical examples of privacy-invasive software are adware, spyware and content hijacking programs. System monitors record various actions on computer systems." It goes on to further define:

                                             

                                            "Privacy-invasive software is a category of software that ignores users’ right to be left alone and that is distributed with a specific intent, often of a commercial nature, which negatively affect[s] its users. In this context, ignoring users’ right to be left alone means that the software is unsolicited and that it does not permit users to determine for themselves when, how and to what extent personally identifiable data is gathered, stored or processed by the software. Distributed means that it has entered the computer systems of users from (often unknown) servers placed on the Internet infrastructure. Often of a commercial nature means that the software (regardless of type or quality) is used as a tool in some sort of a commercial plan to gain revenues."

                                             

                                            (cite: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privacy-invasive_software )

                                             

                                            Yes, some SOL's store innocous information about your surfing habits - you're right to make it easier to log on, remember settings, etc. But those all can be accomplished with browser cookies. And I'll tell you - look at the size of most SOLs. Their file sizes are just a couple K. Don't tell me that storing 2k of information on my computer is going to expedidite my web browsing. That's simply not true. The SOLs are simply there with no other reason then to track you, be it for good or bad purposes. And although Adobe claims this functionality is "disabled," SOLs also have the ability to access the data contained in a third party's SOL. Now, why would someone develop a feature only to disable it? That makes NO sense.

                                             

                                            Let's look at Google. Google has a lot at stake riding on knowing your web habits, visting site after site, the content, how long you spent there, how often you go back. Ok, it's bad enough it's advertisers taking part in this highly unethical practice, but think of the ramifications and potential uses by the unscrupulous or law enforcement... I mean, you probably would rather not. Things like this terrify me because it leaves you wondering, what's next? What's safe? Is there any privacy ANYWHERE?

                                             

                                            I mean the development of the original browser cookie was to my knowledge done with the idea that it would be to enhance the end users web browsing in a positive way - advertisers claim that's what they are doing with their cookies and yeah they may be right - but when you find cookies in your browser from websites you didn't even click to, they just happened to have a banner on a webpage you did click to, aren't you just a little worried?

                                             

                                            This doesn't have to do with having anything to hide - like you're looking at kiddy porn or something. This is about the right to have control over your own property - your computer - and explicitly be able to accept or deny what is put on it.

                                             

                                            The interface Adobe refers people to to adjust their SOL preferences is a joke - it looks like a comic strip and it simply is a facade. It doesn't work. I used it as instructed and it didn't do one thing on any of the computers that I changed. I'm sure the people at Adobe who developed this are all sitting back laughing like crazy because people are clicking on this cartoon like interface thinking it's changing some setting directly on their computer. It's insane. Instead, I've changed permissions on folders all over to "no access" or "read only" to prevent further SOLs from showing up.

                                             

                                            AdobeRLiars is right on the money and I would just caution you to be very careful.

                                             

                                            Thanks,

                                            Tom

                                            • 19. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                              emhuang Adobe Employee

                                              Hi,

                                               

                                              Thanks for highlighting your concerns for us. We are actively working on improving the end user controls of Flash Player settings, and I would like to point out some resources on these topics for people.

                                               

                                              The Flash Player security and privacy center has a few articles that may be of interest for end users:

                                               

                                              Also, I wanted to clarify one of the points you made about Flash Player not doing what you ask the browser to do. At this time, Flash Player is not able to integrate with the browser's cookie deleting option/mechanism, as the browser does not currently provide such APIs for plugins. We have requested these APIs so that we can provide a more intuitive way for users to manage the Flash cookies by obeying the configuration they have set in their browser. So today, changing your browser settings will have no impact on Flash Player settings. Users do need to manage this with the Flash Player settings manager. See: How do I manage and disable local shared objects ("Flash cookies")?

                                               

                                              The information about which sites you visit, by virtue of being folders on your hard drive, is not available outside of your computer. Web content is not able to find out this information just because the site contains Flash content. The information contained within the LSO is available to the SWF on the domain that set it, and not by other SWFs on other domains. Ads are often embedded onto pages in a particular domain, but are actually hosted from a different domain. This is known as third party content. To learn more about what a third-party LSO is and how to prevent this type of cookie or tracking, see this article.

                                               

                                              I understand the concerns you have about privacy, and encourage you to review the information provided above. Again, we are working to make the end user controls better and more easily understood so that people can appropriately manage our software to meet their privacy concerns.

                                               

                                              Regards,

                                              Emmy Huang

                                              Group Product Manager, Adobe Flash Player

                                              • 20. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                                MyDogIsBart Level 1

                                                That's all old news.

                                                 

                                                That interface to change settings is a joke - it looks like a comic strip.I used it a long time ago - clearing out all old websites and setting storage capacity for both visited and future sites to none, and ticking "never ask again." I did it again tonight just for old times sake... and Ihad a bunch of SOL's after a few hour.

                                                 

                                                And how is that Adobe can design the mechanism to get the SOL onto one's machine through a browser - they are stored in a Macromedia folder for God's sake.- yet claims they can't do anything about managing them once they are there except to offer a cartoon? LOL.

                                                 

                                                Please stop all this nonsense.You're better off spinning your story to folks who will believe it who don't know.  -

                                                • 21. Re: How to Delete Privacy-Invading Flash Cookies
                                                  emhuang Adobe Employee

                                                  Hi,

                                                   

                                                  That sounds like a very bad bug that we need to investigate. Can you file it at bugs.adobe.com/flashplayer and let me know the JIRA bug ID?

                                                   

                                                  Thanks,

                                                  Emmy