7 Replies Latest reply on May 20, 2009 10:25 AM by Larry Tseng

    Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing

    Tarun Chopra

      Hi,

       

      I have a quato 213e series monitor which is properly calibrated. The problem that I am facing is as follows:

       

      when I Proof Setup PS to view to ISOnewspaper26v4.icc standard, because paper white is not set, I see very bright colours, if I turn on the "Simulate Paper Color" Option the image looks more or less OK but the image looks very flat compared to the printed sample. am I doing any thing wrong here?

       

      Just for information the images are already CMYK in ISOnewspaper26v4.icc color space and the test printed sample is very close to the ISOnewspaper standard, so thinking that either the image is not properly tagged or the printed sample is not good is not an option.

       

      I have no problem with any other kind of images except newspaper images that too I presume is because of such huge difference in the paper white of the newsprint media.

       

      Thanks

      Tarun

        • 1. Re: Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing
          Lou Dina Level 3

          Tarun,

           

          How are you generating the printed sample; please give us the exact steps, settings, etc.  Are you talking about a job coming off the press or a simulation from an inkjet?

           

          Need more info.

           

          Lou

          • 2. Re: Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing
            Tarun Chopra Level 1

            Lou,

             

            I have both ie press sheet and inkjet simulation. Inkjet simulation is very accurate and so is the press target as that was printed specifically for testing purpose only. For all practical purposes even if I ignore the press reproduction and just consider "inkjet simulation on Newsprint Media".

             

            I have checked the conformance of the inkjet simulation using the media wedge and the max drift is less than dE 5. As far as images are concerned they were in sRGB and were converted to ISOnewspaper26v4.icc using perceptual rendering intent, these CMYK images are proofed on inkjet proofer. I am comparing my monitors colours to the colours from the inkjet proofer, on the monitor in proofsetup in photoshop I am just turning on the "Simulate Paper Color" to get exact feel of the images, colours are kind of OK but the black is dull because of which there is loss of contrast on the monitor compared to the inkjet sample.

             

            Also there seems to be difference in what I see in PS and Acrobat!!! does it happen this way?

             

            Tarun

            • 3. Re: Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing
              Lou Dina Level 3

              Tarun,

               

              ISO Newsprint 26v4 has a paper white (I hesitate to call it "white") of 85L, 1a, 5b, which is a very dull, yellowish-whitish gray.  The black point is 32L, 0a, 1b, which is a very weak black (more of a dark gray).  The dynamic range is pitiful on newsprint.  I know you are aware of all this.

               

              Soft proofing super low dynamic range in Photoshop is not easy.  First, I would definitely check the "Paper White" box.  Hit the Tab key to hide all your palettes, make sure the white ruler is not displayed, and repeatedly hit the "F" key on your keyboard until you have the gray background showing, without any other photoshop elements (especially pure white and pure black elements).  Yes, it will still be washed out, but at least you won't be comparing your dingy soft proof to bright white and dark black components on the screen.  These will make the comparison look even worse.  I'd also turn the ambient room lighting down low and be sure you don't any bright lights or objects in your field of view. This will help a little.

               

              The monitor black point and ambient viewing conditions are critical when viewing low dynamic range processes, and checking Black Ink or Paper White takes some getting used to.  I never find it truly accurate either. Your eye gets fooled easily by any brighter or darker elements so they should be avoided.  The higher the dynamic range and gamut of your final print, the better the soft proof appears.  The lower the gamut and dynamic range, the worse the match, at least in my experience.  You have to learn to interpret what you are seeing and what to expect on the printed page.

               

              If you have verified that your inkjet simulation is a decent match to your output on newsprint, I'd rely on that as a guide.  And when simulating newsprint on your inkjet, use Relative Colorimetric with BPC OFF, or Absolute Colorimetric, otherwise you will remap blacks to the higher Dmax capability of your proofing paper, and they will be darker than newsprint can reach. I'd also use an uncoated, matte, dingy proofing paper if you have it.

               

              Lou

              • 4. Re: Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing
                Tarun Chopra Level 1

                Lou,

                 

                What's your opinion on the difference in viewing colors within different Adobe applications. What I see in PS is slightly different from what I see in Acrobat. Is this problem there?

                 

                Tarun

                • 5. Re: Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing
                  Gusgsm Level 2

                  Tarun,

                   

                  Maybe you have not checked the option "Overprint preview" when spoftproofing the PDF in Acrobat?

                  • 6. Re: Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing
                    Lou Dina Level 3

                    Tarun,

                     

                    I find Acrobat's interface less that stellar.  But, I usually see the same thing in Acrobat as Photoshop, if everything is done right.  First, I make sure the PDF  has all colors converted to my final print space, in this case, ISO Newsprint 26v4.  I usually use PDF/X and make sure the output intent is included in the file.  Then open in Acrobat and it should see the output intent and use it as source.  To see the soft proof, you have to do an output preview (or print preview, or whatever it is called) and make sure you select your final output profile to see how it will look.  When you close out that dialog, your screen display goes back to what it was before.  I find that really irritating.  I forget, but I think Acrobat's "normal" display defaults to whatever is set in the CMYK color settings.  Also, I am using Acrobat Pro 7.0.  I haven't bothered upgrading it in awhile.

                     

                    Lou

                    • 7. Re: Setting up Monitor for Newspaper viewing
                      Larry Tseng

                      Tarun,

                       

                      Tarun Chopra wrote:

                       

                      . . . What I see in PS is slightly different from what I see in Acrobat. Is this problem there?

                       



                      I see slight differences with Acrobat and Photoshop side by side on my monitor even though RGB values from a screen grab are identical. If you are reasonably sure that you've got everything else right, maybe you're seeing distortions due to viewing angle and locale?

                       

                      Larry