2 Replies Latest reply on May 25, 2009 8:24 PM by the_wine_snob

    A MASSIVE CHALLENGE :s - 14 hrs footage

    SG-Filmskills

      hi,

       

      i'm working at a video production company running premiere pro cs3.

      i have a great challenge that i need to overcome

       

      i have been given 14 hours raw footage and i need to get it to dvd for the client to review.

      can anyone help?

       

      any help would be appreciated

      thank you

        • 1. Re: A MASSIVE CHALLENGE :s - 14 hrs footage
          John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          What is the CODEC of the "raw footage"? - use the FREE http://www.headbands.com/gspot if you don't know

           

          What is the target CODEC for delivery to the client?

           

          If your 14 hours is SD (Standard Definition) of the DV AVI type 2 codec, which uses right at 13Gig per hour, you have about 182 Gigabytes... so you could just buy a USB hard drive to ship back and forth to the client

           

          But... that will only work if they have the AVI codec installed on their computer

           

          If they have a Windows computer, you might want to export as WMV so they may use the Windows Media Player

           

          If it absolutely must be on DVD... create as many movie DVD's as it takes

           

          For best quality, export 1 or 1.5 hour pieces to Encore and create simple DVD's

          • 2. Re: A MASSIVE CHALLENGE :s - 14 hrs footage
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            I've done up to 12 hours of DVD's with PrPro2. I've experienced no problems, and this was with about 6-8 Video Tracks/Sequence, many Effects and 24 Audio Tracks to DD 5.1 SS via the SurCode DD plug-in. I also did a DTS Audio Track for this Project.

             

            My recommendation would be to study your computer's I/O sub-system. Can it handle this load? I've got an 8 hr. Project, that I move around via a FW-800 2TB Maxtor external (same drive letter set in each computer's OS), and have everything on this drive (plus the originals on another external).

             

            Next, lay out your Project so that each Sequence is either a full DVD, or is a Chapter in the DVD. I usually choose the latter, and do the DVD assembly and authoring in Encore. I like keeping my Sequences to the point of Chapters, or acts in the finished DVD. This also allows greater latitude with regard to Export and production in Encore. I also Export everything as an elemental stream, i.e. a DV-AVI Type II Video-only file (Export>Movie) and then the Audio as an AC3 (Audio-only). PCM/WAV 48KHz 16-bit Export (Export>AME) would work well, if you do not do DD 5.1 SS.

             

            After you outline your Project, stick to it. Do not vary.

             

            You should have no issues, if you plan properly.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt