9 Replies Latest reply on May 28, 2009 4:51 PM by the_wine_snob

    Removing cackles from an audio track

    rowby Level 1

      Hello All!

       

      I need to remove some occasional cackles from an audio track in Premiere CS4

       

      I see various audio effects, including

       

      DeClicker (I assume that would be for removing clicks like found in old vinyl records...

      DeCrackler -- that sounds closer to what I want to do...

      DeNoiser

       

      Anyway which of the above (or some other) would be good for removing the occasional cackle in a sound track.

       

      And any tutorials (video prefered) that can further explain these special tools?  I don't have time to read a book right now, but a recommendation for a good Premiere Cs4 book is something I could also  use.

       

      Thanks

       

      Rowby

        • 1. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
          joshtownsend Level 2

          Soundbooth will work better than the FX in Premiere (There's only three so I'm guessing you alrady tried them and they didn't work. Search 'spectral repair' in the Adobe help. It's pretty easy stuff.

           

          I use (an totally swear by) Izotope denoiser but it cost me a good chunck of a weeks paycheck so you might wanna stick to the simpler programs.

           

          Then again not really sure what a cackle is (did you have a witch sneaking around set?)

           

          TRY THIS TUTORIAL. Maybe upload a .wav file and and we can give you better advice.

          • 2. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
            rowby Level 1

            Hi  joshtownsend (and anyone else who wants to jump in)

             

            Thanks for your suggestions. I will check the links etc.

             

            In the meantime I am attaching a sample of sections of the track.

             

            There are three "cackles" in this track. I hope you can hear them

             

            While I am at it I would also like to remove some of the reverb from the room.  It was not taped in a studio and the walls were hard. Any good filter to make the room not sound so "live" or in other words remove some of the "echo"?

             

            By the way, I do have Soundbooth CS4

             

            Thanks

             

            Rowby

            • 3. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
              Alexey Lukin

              Crackle's easy to fix if you have RX: audio-test.wav (using the Manual Declicker tool).

              • 4. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                SoundBooth should be good. Audition would be even better. Besides the VST's in SB, Audition also has a ton more. In the Restoration area, you can fix a ton of defects, some with just a click-listen-tweak-click. Note: Audition is PC-only. For Mac Pro Tools would be my first choice.

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
                  rowby Level 1

                  HI

                  Downloaded a trial of Audition and zapped the few clicks.  Very nice.

                   

                  Is there a preset effect in audition that will help me reduce the slight echo, in other words reduce a bit of the room sound (it was recorded in a room with hard walls.)

                   

                  Thanks

                   

                  Rowby

                  • 6. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
                    Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                    Hi rowby,

                     

                    Please start a new discussion for your new problem.  You should also start that new topic in the Audition forum, where you will likely get better and/or quicker results than posting here.

                     

                    -Jeff

                    • 7. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      Persuant to Jeff's suggestion, it will help everyone, if you do a new post. By this, I mean that people will see the "crackle" aspect, know that it's been answered and never realize that there is more. Also, when people search for titles that might help them with "echo," they might overlook this thread. "Search" is still very much a "work-in-progress" on the new forum. Now, it matters more than ever, that the Titles of post convey the problem.

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt

                       

                      Hint: in very general terms, the best treatment for the "echo" is to not overdo the corrections in the restoration of your Audio Clip. Just a touch too much will produce that echo. If you used the Noise Reduction, go back, and tweak the amount down just a bit. Use Repair Transient on very specific parts of the Clip for the "crackle." Work slowly with your restoration and listen to the Preview very carefully. Use Ctrl-z a bunch, until you get it right. The Audition people can help you very specifically.

                      • 8. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
                        joshtownsend Level 2

                        Well I think you guys might be talking two different thing.

                         

                        If RECORDING ENVIRONMENT has too much echo it is near impossible to fix with any plug-in.

                         

                        then there's what Wine Snob is talking about. When you clean up too much with a 'noise reduction' and get a watery/tinny sound then you need to do just as Wine Snob said. Use little bits of reduction multiple times.

                        • 9. Re: Removing cackles from an audio track
                          the_wine_snob Level 9

                          Josh,

                           

                          You are correct. I read it to be "now I have an echo," when it quite possibly meant, "besides that problem, I also have an echo." As you say, two totally different things. One is best re-recorded and the other a more subtle adjustment going in, plus maybe the use of a few specialized "tools."

                           

                          As wonky and slow as the forum is today, I probably just read it all wrong. At least the replies were not stacked up one each other, or squeezed way off to one side, like some threads today.

                           

                          Thanks,

                           

                          Hunt