7 Replies Latest reply on Jun 1, 2009 8:27 PM by the_wine_snob

    What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?

    jerzypk Level 1

      Hi, everyone! I am new to video editing and would like to know what is the safest or max lenght of the project to produce and burn in PE7. With menus, titles (one video track, and one audio). Thank you.

        • 1. Re: What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Welcome to the Adobe forum.

           

          I think that the question that you are asking is: what is the longest Duration of a Project to fit on a DVD-Video? The answer to that is about one and a half hours with good results. Less will allow you to Transcode (the output to the necessary MPEG-2 encoding for the DVD) at a bit higher rate, allowing for slightly higher quality. Unless one has a lot of quick motion, of either the camera, or the subjects, one is likely not going to see much difference. Now, as you get longer in your Duration, the quality will start to dip. I've put up to two hours and fiftenn minutes with fairly slow moving subjects and no fast camera movement and the quality is still satisfactory, even on a large screen TV. Much longer than that, and you can definitely see the quality dropping.

           

          Now, there is another possibility for your question: what is the longest Duration of a Project in PE? For this, one must first consider the Assests themselves, and also the computer system. The more difficult the Assests are to work with, or the weaker the computer is, the shorter the Project might need to be to allow one to edit comfortably. For this question, you will need to talk more about your Assets, type, camera, and all details. The same for your computer system. On my robust laptop, I've easily done 3 hour Projects with DV-AVI Type II files and never had a problem, or a slowdown. With a weak computer, one should consider breaking the Project into smaller pieces, and then doing an assembly for the final output to DVD.

           

          Let me know which you mean, and if the latter, please give us some details, as the answers will make a big difference.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?
            jerzypk Level 1

            Thank you kindly for your prompt answer to my "not-quite-specified" question! You beautifully explained it in the first part of your post, although the second part was very educational as well. I cheer to you with a good drop of wine

            • 3. Re: What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              Glad that I could help and that my "wrong" answer also provided some useful info.

               

              When it comes to stretching the limits of PE, others here will have to provide you with concrete recs., as I do most of my editing in PE's big brother PrPro. I know what it can handle on my workstation. Others have pressed the limits of PE and can offer so much more useful info.

               

              I'm raising my glass of 1er Cru Chablis to you. It's always nice when one asks the questions before getting a month into a Project, only to find that what they wanted, needed to be done another way. Good to see a user doing their homework. Should you have any questions, you know where to start.

               

              Good luck,

               

              Hunt

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?
                Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                1er Cru Chablis?

                 

                Hunt, you ARE a wine snob!

                 

                I'm more of a two-buck chuck man myself...

                • 5. Re: What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?
                  John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  Drifting OT...

                   

                  >glass of 1er Cru Chablis

                   

                  I really like Chenin Blanc... which is Vouvray if from the right area of France

                   

                  I've not gotten into Chablis all that much... have you had Vouvray so you can compare?

                   

                  The "big" white wine in most places seems to be Chardonnay... but to be GOOD it must have more acidity in the wine than is true for most bottlings, to produce some "sharpness" to go with the rest of the Chardonnay fruitiness

                  • 6. Re: What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?
                    jerzypk Level 1

                    I sure am glad to see you take the time to discuss your wine drinking preferences. "In vino veritas".

                    • 7. Re: What is the safest lenght of movie to produce in PE7?
                      the_wine_snob Level 9
                      I've not gotten into Chablis all that much... have you had Vouvray so you can compare?

                       

                      I've had many Vouvrays from almost full sec. to bone dry. I enjoy all of the well-made ones. Now, I've only had one domestic (US to me) Chenin Blanc, and it is a blend. Pine Ridge does a Chenin Blanc, Voignier, that is a great little wine. It has the balance of Chenin Blanc, plus the floral notes of Viognier. The slight fruit-driven aspect of the Chenin Blanc cuts the "edge," that Viognier can exhibit.

                       

                      I've not gotten into Chablis all that much... have you had Vouvray so you can compare?

                      Because Chablis is 100% Chardonnay (not counting some US wines that usurp the name), there are major differences. While Chenin is often smooth, though often one-dimensional, a fine Chablis should have multiple layers. Normally, they are fermented in some stainless steel and some used American oak, so there is far less oak, than in a Chardonnay done in Montrachet. The Chablis region also is cooler, being closer to Paris and the Champagne Region, than most of Burgundy, so the grapes do not ripen to the extent of other white Burgundies. Normally, one uses terms like flinty, steely, slate and such to describe a Chablis. It is also more austere, than most other white Burgs. For more character and even more layers of flavors and aromas, Meursault and Montrachet are a pretty big step up. There is more oak and more "vanilla," plus riper fruit.

                       

                      In general terms, I think of Chenin as more of an afternoon, or welcome wine, and then move up to Chablis for a seafood course. If one has a cream sauce, then I reach for a Montrachet, or a Meursault.

                       

                      Before Steve runs me off for good, or somebody "reports me," maybe I should move this to Chowhound.com

                       

                      Hunt