6 Replies Latest reply on Sep 17, 2008 12:28 PM by DarrenDoesIt

    Adobe forces you to buy several gigs worth of more software

    DarrenDoesIt
      There is not reason this software shouldn't play the sound in the sound channel from the point in time where the cursor is at. If you want to import one long *** sound as the entire soundtrack for something you're animating frame by frame, you're screwed. Just because sound is measured in time as opposed to frames doesn't mean the program isn't measuring it in sprite. The sound starts from the beginning no matter where in the middle of the sound you play it from. This is so that you'll have to blow money on quepoint marker software and add another step to an already tedious process. I'd rather calculate quepoints for 30fps after observing a spectrogram on Audacity and keep track on a notepad. This is yet another example of how Adobe forces you to buy/download another piece of software, save twice as many files, and only use one damn feature that you need off of the program. Not to mention Adobe is responsible for a considerable amount of spam on the net. Thanks Adobe.
        • 1. Re: Adobe forces you to buy several gigs worth of more software
          Level 7

          "DarrenDoesIt" <webforumsuser@macromedia.com> wrote in message
          news:gar7te$2ae$1@forums.macromedia.com...
          > There is not reason this software shouldn't play the sound in the
          > sound channel
          > from the point in time where the cursor is at. If you want to
          > import one long
          > *** sound as the entire soundtrack for something you're animating
          > frame by
          > frame, you're screwed. Just because sound is measured in time as
          > opposed to
          > frames doesn't mean the program isn't measuring it in sprite. The
          > sound starts
          > from the beginning no matter where in the middle of the sound you
          > play it from.
          > This is so that you'll have to blow money on quepoint marker
          > software and add
          > another step to an already tedious process. I'd rather calculate
          > quepoints for
          > 30fps after observing a spectrogram on Audacity and keep track on a
          > notepad.
          > This is yet another example of how Adobe forces you to buy/download
          > another
          > piece of software, save twice as many files, and only use one damn
          > feature that
          > you need off of the program. Not to mention Adobe is responsible
          > for a
          > considerable amount of spam on the net. Thanks Adobe.
          >

          well,
          before buying anything you always check what it does, and if it suits
          your needs.
          Right?
          Or ?

          Sounds like you got the wrong tool for the job and are now trying to
          blame someone else.

          There are ways to come close to what you want within Director, but it
          is not going to be easy or quick.
          You would be much better off getting some other software for this
          specific job.

          Richard.


          • 2. Re: Adobe forces you to buy several gigs worth of more software
            Production Monkey Level 3
            You don't need to buy a bunch of different software. You need to buy the correct piece of software for the job. You will be far happier with After Effects. It is designed to accurately sync animations with sound. Director is not.
            • 3. Re: Adobe forces you to buy several gigs worth of more software
              DarrenDoesIt Level 1
              Well you see, I'm using the software sort of as though it is a paper animation studio, not a vector animation program. Surprisingly, it is the only software for the job and that is precisely what is so frustrating. If I wanted to use Maya for the same purpose I could but it would have compatibility issues with photoshop files. There is virtually no easier alternative because I've asked the advice of several fellow animators and I've searched far and wide for a program with the same sprite/member concept. Doesn't exist.
              • 4. Re: Adobe forces you to buy several gigs worth of more software
                DarrenDoesIt Level 1
                I have after effects too. That does not solve the problem because after effects is not suitable for my technique. I require the sprite/member structure of director. Director is absolute the correct software, it just lacks a very simple feature when you get into sound that forces you to purchase quepoint software. After effects may be designed to sync animation with sound, yes, but its very time/vector based--almost impossible for frame by frame. All sound must be prerecorded onto and mixed into a single .wav. Thank you for trying to help, though.
                • 5. Re: Adobe forces you to buy several gigs worth of more software
                  Mike Blaustein Level 4
                  Perhaps you would be better off setting some cue points in the audio clip. That is kind of the standard way to synch animations to sounds. Doing it the way you appear to be doing it is wrong. Different machines will play your animation back at different speeds, based on the speed of the processor, amount of RAM, other programs running at the same time, etc. Therefore, if you are setting an animation to synchronize with your audio based on the number of seconds that the audio has been playing, it will NOT be frame accurate. In most cases, it will not be very accurate at all.

                  I know you said that you don't want to script anything, but, well, that appears to be how to do what you need. You put cuepoints in the audio, and use a very simple script to see which cuepoints have passed. You time your animation based on that.

                  I think the important thing to note here is that Director is NOT an audio editing program, nor is it a video editing program. Trying to use it as such will frustrate you. Director takes bits of media and plays them. That is why the audio works like it does. It just knows that it needs to play a sound when there is a sound in the sound channel. You can use simple scripts to set the current time of the sound, so it will start from a different place, but it is completely unrelated to the number of frames that pass in the score.
                  • 6. Re: Adobe forces you to buy several gigs worth of more software
                    DarrenDoesIt Level 1
                    Good point, Mike. I'm obviously frustrated because there isn't really a single all-inclusive piece of software that will accomplish everything I need because the technique is a bit unique yet rough. Editing software lacks features of director and vice versa, so I guess I'll take a chill pill and get some scripting out of the way as well as perhaps working out some cue points. Thanks for the good answer.

                    --Darren