5 Replies Latest reply on Jul 23, 2009 1:28 AM by mwoz42

    Budget Inkjet proof

    Miguel Curto Level 1

      Not sure if this is the right section of forums to post but it seemed the more adequate.

       

      I need to set-up a budget inkjet proof.Acuracy (as in matching final result) is not critical.All I need to have is a best estimate of RGB files changes on gamuts,contrast while converted to CMYK.

       

      This is more of a means to evaluate photographs in an environment close to a commercial CMYK printer.

       

      Images would be printed from Photoshop, and I know the proper steps to simulate other smaller gamut printers but it's been a while since I've delt with new Inkjet printers on the market.I have the opportunity to grab an Epson Stylus Pro 3800 on a very good deal and I was planning to buy the Spyder3 Studio bundle to profile the papers.

       

      I guess my real questions are:

       

      1- What kind of media would be most appropriate to print?

      2- Are there any inconveniences using this particular printer?

      3- I dont have access to final printer CMYK files, but all I need is a estimate...what kind of profiles would be best suited to simulate a half-decent commercial print (both coated and uncoated)

      4- Epson claims that their printers using Epson Proof Paper needs a RIP...cant see why.Is this BS?

      6-Any other Epson printer in the same class is considered more able for this kind of using?

      5- Any other recommendations?

       

      Ty in advance.

       

      PS-I do know there arent generic CMYK profiles but like I said: all I need is an estimate of color clipping and contrast so ( some annoying ) clients get to see something looking (but not a real proof ) like the final print and not the version they have evaluated on their freaking 100€ TN panels.

        • 1. Re: Budget Inkjet proof
          Rick McCleary Level 3

          I have the opportunity to grab an Epson Stylus Pro 3800 on a very good deal and I was planning to buy the Spyder3 Studio bundle to profile the papers.

          Grab it. It's an excellent printer. I have no experience with the Spyder3 package. Among the affordable solutions (~$500), ColorMunki is the only one I've used. For the money, it's pretty sweet.

          1- What kind of media would be most appropriate to print?

          Definitely not photo paper - usually way too bright and blue. There are a number of proofing papers out there. I use Epson Proofing White Semimatte. 13" x 100' (you have to hand-cut it - there's no roll attachment on the 3800.)

          3- I dont have access to final printer CMYK files, but all I need is a estimate...what kind of profiles would be best suited to simulate a half-decent commercial print (both coated and uncoated)

          US or Europe?

          4- Epson claims that their printers using Epson Proof Paper needs a RIP...cant see why.Is this BS?

          No, not BS. SWOP has certified a number of proofing systems. A system is a combination of printer/ink, RIP, and paper. For the 3800 to be certified, it must be used in combination with one of a number of different RIPs and one of a number of specific papers. This serves a purpose in a pre-press, contract proof environment. However, you have stated that your looking for a best estimate (not critical color.) For that, you can stick to using the Epson driver and print in Proof mode (simulating the ultimate CMYK output.) It works very well.

           

          One note: If you're looking to proof Pantone colors, you have to use a RIP. (More details on that if you need.)

          6-Any other Epson printer in the same class is considered more able for this kind of using?

          The only thing the 7880 or 9800 gets you is larger media (24" wide and 42" wide). Their new printers (x990 series) are even more wonderful, but you're out of the "budget" range.

          5- Any other recommendations?

          No other recommendations other than to reiterate that the 3800 is a great machine.

           

          Hope that helps!

          Rick

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Budget Inkjet proof
            Miguel Curto Level 1

            Rick McCleary wrote:

             


            Rick McCleary wrote:

             


            3- I dont have access to final printer CMYK files, but all I need is a estimate...what kind of profiles would be best suited to simulate a half-decent commercial print (both coated and uncoated)

            US or Europe?

            4- Epson claims that their printers using Epson Proof Paper needs a RIP...cant see why.Is this BS?

            No, not BS. SWOP has certified a number of proofing systems. A system is a combination of printer/ink, RIP, and paper. For the 3800 to be certified, it must be used in combination with one of a number of different RIPs and one of a number of specific papers. This serves a purpose in a pre-press, contract proof environment. However, you have stated that your looking for a best estimate (not critical color.) For that, you can stick to using the Epson driver and print in Proof mode (simulating the ultimate CMYK output.) It works very well.

             



             

            Ty for your help, just one more thing:

             

            Main purpose it to evaluate photos,so no real need for RIP or proofing Pantone colors.Wont be used for either serious pre-press or contract-proof, only for evaluation and guideline for the customer.

             

            Europe, but I dont think it really matters...I was thinking of "Coated FOGRA27", as I understand would be one of the closest things I could get to a generic CMYK ideal for photos.Do you sugest another one?

             

            Since im gonna profile the papers myself dont really have to use Epson papers.Do they worth what they cost?If so its ok,its not like they are that expensive.

             

            Ty

            • 3. Re: Budget Inkjet proof
              Rick McCleary Level 3

              Main purpose it to evaluate photos,so no real need for RIP or proofing Pantone colors.Wont be used for either serious pre-press or contract-proof, only for evaluation and guideline for the customer.

              The Epson 3800 with the Epson driver will work great for that.

              Europe, but I dont think it really matters...I was thinking of "Coated FOGRA27", as I understand would be one of the closest things I could get to a generic CMYK ideal for photos.Do you sugest another one?

              Either Fogra27 or Fogra39. Their Total Inks are different, but if you're just using them to see an estimation of the restricted CMYK gamut on an RGB print, there's not much difference.

              Since im gonna profile the papers myself dont really have to use Epson papers.Do they worth what they cost?If so its ok,its not like they are that expensive.

              Yes, I'd say they're worth it. I don't think they're any more expensive than any other major brand.

               

              HTH,

              Rick

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Budget Inkjet proof
                Ink_Specialist

                We use EPson R3800 with this UFOSYSTEM 3800 kit.

                The problem of using a Eospn R3800 is the ink cost; however, this kit saved us huge.

                I did run gamut test on the Epson original vs ufosystem's clearview.

                UFOSYSTEM1.jpg

                ufosystem 3800-1.jpg

                • 5. Re: Budget Inkjet proof
                  mwoz42

                  just let you guys know epson now is selling refurb 3800 with hundred dollars discount and now you can get an epson 3800 less than 900 bucks.... what a geat deal! I got my 3800 2 years ago, it was like 1300!!! I also had a R2400 back to 2004, but  I need something that can use bulk ink because printing our works sucks up ink  like you wouldn't believe, so we ended up to get a 3800 so far the printing cost is cheaper than 2400, still expensive..... and we may consider to get a CIS system or 3800 refill cartridges.