6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 1, 2009 6:50 PM by Colin Brougham

    Map audio channels of items in sequence?

    xleggs Level 1

      I'm fairly new to Premiere CS4 (FCP guy). I have rough cut a piece with interviews recorded on ch.1 and b-roll. I've used Fill Left which works, but I was hoping to use Map Audio Channels to avoid chasing filters all over the place.

       

      I found that I could remap the channels of items that were not yet edited into a sequence, yet, when I opened clips that were edited into my sequence, the controls to change mapping were grayed out.

       

      Is there a way to do this?

        • 1. Re: Map audio channels of items in sequence?
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          Unfortunately, no, it has to be done before a clip is used. And it makes sense, really, because once you reference that clip in a sequence, you're effectively using its media as it was recorded. If you were able to change the channel mappings after the clip was used, the clip reference in the timeline would be pointing to (for all practical purposes) different media.

           

          You could duplicate all of your source clips in the bin, then change the mappings, and then you'd have to replace each individual clip in your sequence. Tedious, but it would work.

           

          Another, easier option would be to apply your Fill Left (or Right, whichever you need) to an entire track in the Audio Mixer, instead of individual clips. This makes filter management much easier and faster. Just open up the audio mixer, swivel down the effects bank, and click in the dropdown to add your Fill filter to your track.

          • 2. Re: Map audio channels of items in sequence?
            xleggs Level 1

            Thanks- I'm glad that the issue was reproducable- and it sure is great to get such fast responses here. This board is great.

             

            I must say that Adobe does not always "look out" for the editor like this. For instance, if you copy and paste a title, then change one of them, they both change- even if they're not in the same sequence. (FCP sees each iteration of a title as a new title which carries its own problems) In this case, though, I don't see how remapping my audio would do anything but exactly what I want to do.

             

            Kudos to the experts taking time to answer questions!

            • 3. Re: Map audio channels of items in sequence?
              Colin Brougham Level 6
              In this case, though, I don't see how remapping my audio would do anything but exactly what I want to do.

              Well, the reason is that Premiere treats audio differently than FCP does. In FCP, every audio track in a sequence is a mono track, period. You have no other options. Even if you import or capture a stereo audio clip (let's say a CD audio track, for instance), the two channels of the source clip are mapped to mono tracks: the left channel would go to to A1, and the right channel would go to A2, for example. You can create "stereo pairs" in FCP by selecting two clips on adjacent tracks and pairing them (which I believe automatically applies stereo panning, ie. hard left and hard right), but at their base level they are still mono tracks.

               

              Premiere is different, however, in that you can have mono tracks, stereo tracks, and 5.1 tracks in a sequence, or any combination thereof. As such, a source clip can only go to a matching track in a sequence; for example, a stereo source clip can only go into a stereo track in your sequence. This is where source channel mapping comes into play. You can instruct Premiere to treat the stereo audio track of a clip as two mono tracks, for example, with the end result being that those tracks WON'T go onto a stereo track in a sequence. They will ONLY go onto mono tracks (two of, to be exact) in a destination sequence.

               

              So if you've already used a stereo clip in a sequence, it has to be on a stereo track. Premiere will then prevent you from remapping those audio channels because of the identity of the destination track in the sequence, meaning that remapping from stereo to two monos won't work once the clip is in use. If you remap the channels before using the clip, you're golden. Hope that helps; it's simply a matter of the differences in the way the two programs work.

               

              Regarding titles: this is another case of the way two programs work. In FCP, titles are an effect, and so have no reference to any sort of "source," which is why you can copy and paste and change and the original stays the way it was. In Premiere, a title is a "synthetic" clip and therefore has a "source" so if you change the parent all of the children change as well. However, you can work around this by copying and pasting your title, double-click the copy to open the editor, and then click the "New Title Based on Current Title" button (looks like a film frame with a capital T in it). Name your new title and edit it. When you close the titler, you'll have a new title in your bin. Drag it from the bin and while holding the Alt key, drop it on the copy already in the timeline--this will replace the content of that clip instance in the timeline and maintain any effects or transitions you'd placed on the clip.

              • 4. Re: Map audio channels of items in sequence?
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                Colin,

                 

                You covered that nicely. Regarding the Titles, the one time that it is good to have several "instances" of the same Title would where one repeated, such as 4 instances of "Meanwhile, back at the ranch... " If you did need to alter that repeated Title, you just edit it and those changes are applied to all instances of it.

                 

                Your pointing to the "Based on... " is something that is too often overlooked. While documented, it does not stand out, and many new users miss it completely. To me, it, plus the Title Templates, are great. Now, if only the dialog for naming would keep the base-Title's name, and allow one to just postpend a "1," or similar, rather than having to retype the Title name. I end up doing a lot of Ctrl-c/Ctrl-v with my Tilte names, and also try to do that at one time, rather than as I go along. Minor quibble with Adobe, but after 3 version's Feature Request, they still do not see the need.

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: Map audio channels of items in sequence?
                  xleggs Level 1

                  Thanks to both of you for the thorough responses! I noticed the stero track thing- but now that you explain it- I totally understand it. I've been using the "based on" feature extensively. There have been times I wished a could globally fix a misspelled name key in FCP- not so easy!

                  • 6. Re: Map audio channels of items in sequence?
                    Colin Brougham Level 6
                    Now, if only the dialog for naming would keep the base-Title's name, and allow one to just postpend a "1," or similar, rather than having to retype the Title name. I end up doing a lot of Ctrl-c/Ctrl-v with my Tilte names, and also try to do that at one time, rather than as I go along. Minor quibble with Adobe, but after 3 version's Feature Request, they still do not see the need.

                    Preach on, brother. I came from Avid, which had an almost sickeningly-basic title tool (it's FAR better than FCP's, though), but it does have the great capability to quickly generate serially numbered titles. Once you create your original, each altered version you'd save would be automatically incremented with a number at the end of the title. You could fly through a batch of titles, especially if you were copy/pasting from a text document. It drove me mad for the first few months of using PPro that the titler didn't do this--but fortunately I quickly discovered PPro's support of PSDs was pretty robust, and made that my default titler. About the only thing I'll use the titler for any more is for disclaimers and such that appear in various spots. Beyond that, Photoshop is my source for video-texting-love.

                     

                    Incidentally, this blog post at Studio Daily about the madness of NLE title tools (specifically Avid's and FCP's) is painfully humorous and right on the money.