6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 10, 2009 10:42 AM by the_wine_snob

    Save to burn later?

    zendee

      Finished project. Burned dvd's. No need to save file for future changes. BUT may want to burn more dvd's in future.Can I delete the project but keep a file that will burn?

      Have tried burn dvd/burn to folder 8.5G, preset NTSC-Dolby but when burn that save to dvd, it doesn't play.  In my saved file, there are 2 files, OpenDVD and Video-TS. Exactly what file do I burn? What am I missing?

       

      Have also tried to export file to play on a pc in mpeg, get audio but no video. Should I use a diff format to get audio?

      Working in PE4.

       

      Many thanks. This forum has been a great resource.

      Dee

        • 1. Re: Save to burn later?
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          As a test, I would download, install and use ImgBurn to burn your VIDEO_TS folder to an appropriate DVD. You will want the Burn Folder/Files Mode in IngBurn. This should play properly. Burn onto good media and at the slowest possible speed.

           

          If you are absolutely sure that you will not need to edit any further, you can store a DVD on the shelf, and use ImgBurn to Copy DVD. This is easier, if one has 2 burners, but will also work with only one burner. I recommend this ONLY if you know that you will never need to edit this Project again. If so, and your "archive" DVD works fine (test on several devices), you can delete your Project. In a worst case, you can re-Capture from your miniDV tape and start over. It will go more quickly, the next time around.

           

          Personally, I archive my Projects to external HDD's - just in case...

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: Save to burn later?
            Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

            The VIDEO_TS folder is your DVD folder. Burn that to a disc (along with its contents of course) and you'll have a playable DVD.

             

            To play these DVD files on  your computer without burning them to a disc, open your DVD player software, not Windows Media Player. This is the software that launches automatically when you insert a commercial DVD in your computer's drive.

             

            That software likely has a "Play Folder" option. Use this rather than "Open File". Then browse to that VIDEO_TS folder and select that as your DVD folder for play.

             

            That's the key. It's that folder, not the individual files, that is your DVD. "Playing" that folder will ensure that  you're launching the DVD as if it were a disc.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Save to burn later?
              zendee Level 1

              Thanks for the heads-up in ImgBurn. Burned the Video-TS file using burn files/folders & it works on computer dvd playback, but not in a regular dvd player. Is there a way to burn for a dvd/tv setup?

              Next, will try to duplicate the master dvd. I see it's a two-step with ImgBurn. So starting with the dvd that plays in dvd player, do I "create image file from disc" or "create image file from files/folders"? And then do I write image or files/folders?

              Dee

              • 4. Re: Save to burn later?
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                If it plays on your computer, you did nearly everything correctly.

                 

                When a DVD-Video plays on a computer, but not a set-top player, there are most likely one of two things happening:

                 

                1.) the media is not a good choice. I only use Verbatim and Taiyo Yuden. Never had any fail on any machine. The brand of media is crucial. Use only the best. Brands like Memorex, Staples, Ritek, Best Buy, and now TDK are not good media. Do not use them.

                 

                2.) the burn speed was too high to get a good burn. With ImgBurn, you can choose the speed. Use the slowest at all times. If you can get down to 2.4x use that. Saving a few minutes in the Burn will likely be offset by having to redo it.

                 

                No set-top player is required by the DVD-spec to play ANY burned disc, only replicated/stamped discs. That said, really good media and a slow Burn speed will insure the greatest compatibility with all set-top players. Still, remember that none are required to play any burned DVD-Video.

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Save to burn later?
                  zendee Level 1

                  Just burned the video ts with imgburn to a verbatim at 2.4x & it plays in the dvd player.

                  Thanks so much for the great advice,

                  Dee

                  • 6. Re: Save to burn later?
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    Great news, and thanks for reporting. That (or the Taiyo Yuden) is exactly how I always do it, and so far, not one returned DVD.

                     

                    Only issue that I have ever had was with one client's player not playing DVD-9's (DL), and though any player with the DVD logo is supposed to do so, his just would not, if it was a burned DVD-9. He never came back to tell me if all Hollywood replicated DVD's played fine, as most newer titles are DVD-9's. I do not even know what make/model he had to mention that info to others. I just did 2-DVD sets for him on DVD-5's and all was well.

                     

                    Thanks,

                     

                    Hunt