1 Reply Latest reply on Jul 16, 2009 4:51 AM by robdillon

    .flv format question

    mlbe8 Level 1

      Hi Guy's

      So my site was already to launch {or so i thought}.  I had some media content like videos within my site, they were .wmv and linked to my html file.  After testing everything was working fine.  However the web host told me i would need additional script for these .wmv files to play,  So off i went in the quest to learn {metafile script} but found nothing on the subject.  So to cut the long, long story short, i went back to the host and told them of my problem, they sugested i convert all my files to flash as they did support this format.

       

      As part of my Adobe CS4 Master Collection i found Adobe Media encoder so i used this to start converting all my .wmv files to .flv.  The first file was .wmv and 15.3mb once converted to flash the .flv file was 75.8mb.  This is nearly six times the size.  Am i doing somthing wrong?, I am being told flash is the best and most popular format for the web, but with this size of a file if you have say 40, 10 min videos wont this take forever to upload to your host server.

       

      I would realy appreciate any information on this subject,  all my time has been spent in Dreamweaver, with regards to media my knowlage is limited so i would realy appreciate some feedback.

       

      Thank You

      Mark

        • 1. Re: .flv format question
          robdillon Most Valuable Participant

          The increase in file size is unusual and could be attributed to any of a number of reasons. If you have the original video files, you might be able to save the file out directly as an .flv file from the video editing app.

           

          It will be tough to tell you why the file has increased in size without seeing the file and the settings that you used. Transcoding video from one compressed format to another can lead to problems other than file size. Since you are recompressing an already compressed file, you may end up with a file of lower visual and/or audio quality.