5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 11, 2009 3:58 AM by Alan Craven

    Setting uniform volume level

    Lame Tigrrrr Level 1

      Is there a way in Pr Pro to set the volume of all clips to the same level aside from directly adjusting each clip's volume?

        • 1. Re: Setting uniform volume level
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Not directly.

           

          In Audio Mixer, you can "automate" the Levels, with either Touch, or Write, while monitoring the Audio. This will adjust the Levels for the Track.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

           

          PS one can use Audition to adjust these same Levels, and Normalize to a set db level. Probably the same for SB. One might get lucky by using the Audio>Effects>Stereo>Normalize, but I find it less than perfect.

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          • 2. Re: Setting uniform volume level
            Lame Tigrrrr Level 1

            Thanks, Hunt.


            I'd been using Adobe Audition for a while, in fact it was then Cool Edit Pro. And, as a matter of fact, I have my Audition open at this moment because, while editing my video, I am extracting its audio so I can edit its left & right channels (my footages' audio have their right channels empty so I just copy the audio data in the left channel and paste it in the right channel). And I'd been using for a while too the audition's "normalize" effect but I'm not quite sure about its effect. Does that mean that when I normalize my audio file to, say, 80% (I'm not using decibels here), the peak level of my audio will sound the same?

             

            Another question, Hunt, what do READ, WRITE and TOUCH mean in Premiere's audio mixer?

             

            And, the problem by the way is that, in one of my audio tracks, I have multiple audio clips in it with different volume levels. Is it wise to do that, putting all of your audio files in just one track?

             

            Message was edited by: Lame Tigrrrr

            • 3. Re: Setting uniform volume level
              Alan Craven Level 4

              You are correct, normalize sets the peak level of the clip to whatever value you select.

               

              This does not necessarily do what you want - a clip which is mostly fairly low level audio, with a single loud burst (eg a shot of a peaceful lake where a Mallard suddenly lets rip close to the camera) will not fit with other normalized clips taken at the same lake where there is just the usual background chatter of the waterfowl.

               

              In the first clip the duck's shout will be set at say -6 dB, whilst the background may be at -20 dB.  In the other clips, the background will be at -6 dB as this is effectively the peak level.

               

              What I usually do is use Audition to set the background level of each clip to the same value, and for the occasional overloud burst, selectively apply a cut in level to keep the peak within bounds.

               

              Beware also of the "pumping" effect that you get when automatic gain control is on in the camera - after Donald's outburst there will be a clearly audible short term drop in audio level.

              • 4. Re: Setting uniform volume level
                Lame Tigrrrr Level 1

                Gotcha! But there are still some left. Here, I just quoted it from my previous post.

                 

                Another question, Hunt, what do READ, WRITE and TOUCH mean in Premiere's audio mixer?

                 

                And, the problem by the way is that, in one of my audio tracks, I have multiple audio clips in it with different volume levels. Is it wise to do that, putting all of your audio files in just one track?

                • 5. Re: Setting uniform volume level
                  Alan Craven Level 4

                  I can't help you with Read, etc. as I never use Premiere's audio mixer, all my audio editing is done in Audition, to which I graduated from Cool Edit Pro.  I film wildlife almost exclusively, and for one reason or another am rarely able to use the audio that comes with the video, due to people talking, or the RAF practising flying beneath the radar, etc., etc.

                   

                  I have built up a library of my own useable audio and I replace the linked audio with clips from there, or where possible with edits of the linked audio I have done in Audition.  These are all put on audio track 2, and the levels are adjusted so there is not too much jump between adjacent clips.  Sometimes I overlay this with other audio placed on track 3 - I then often need to adjust the levels between the two parallel audio tracks.  I occasionally use the multitrack feature in Audition to build up a useable track, particularly where I have to match the audio to the bird obviously saying things.