7 Replies Latest reply on Aug 12, 2009 10:01 AM by the_wine_snob

    Does multiple resizing affect quality?

    Karel Bata Level 1

      Yes I know that vague...

       

      1) If I start with a video of say, 800x600, create a project of 400x300, worth with that, and then decide to render out at 800x600, will I have lost quality..? I feel I shouldn't, but maybe I'm wrong...

       

      And rather than starting another thread...

       

      2) If I've got a complicated edit of something that I've worked on at SD res, and then HD res files of the same material become available, can I use the old SD edit? Is there a way (that I've so far missed) of changing the project settings? Or else can I import an EDL into another project of different size, and how much of that would work?

        • 1. Re: Does multiple resizing affect quality?
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Karel,

           

          #1 is pretty easy. Match your Sequence/Project's Presets to your footage. Then, if you need to Export to something else, that is where you can deviate. Scaling up and down will decrease your quality. It is not advised, hence the above. The same holds true for still images.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: Does multiple resizing affect quality?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            #2 is a bit more involved, but is a good question. I could see the potential for this happening. Now, if we go back to my answer for #1, you can create a new Sequence (CS4 allows one to change Presets at a Sequence level, where prior versions were global for a Project). One way that I could see doing this would be to start a new Sequence with the proper Presets to match your newly found HD footage, then use your SD Sequence as a guide. Not sure that an EDL would really work, but I hope that I am about to learn something new here.

             

            I've thought about doing a Ctrl-a (Select All) and then a Ctrl-c (Copy), before going to the new HD Sequence and doing a Ctrl-v (Paste of the SD Assets), then relinking the Assets to the new HD ones, but I think that could bet messy in a hurry.

             

            I can only get you started on your new HD Sequence, and had better wait to see what others can offer. There is probably something simple, that is not clicking in my simple mind.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Does multiple resizing affect quality?
              Karel Bata Level 1

              W_S, I think your answer to 1) sounds like the best overall solution - to work in the res of the original. I've tended to work in my anticipated output res (then you know it will actually look like) but this is now getting messy, what with different sizes wanted for different things.

               

              As to 2) I can see how the edits would stay in place, and maybe simple mixes and even wipes, but I doubt that any move, or key-ing, would translate. But I've always wondered, hence the question...

              • 4. Re: Does multiple resizing affect quality?
                the_wine_snob Level 9
                this is now getting messy, what with different sizes wanted for different things.

                 

                One of the positive aspects of the "new & improved" AME (Adobe Media Encoder), is that one can easily set different Export settings for different purposes. Prior to the current version, one had to set it all up - Export. Set it up again - Export. That part has been simplified a bit.

                 

                Good luck, and hope that you get more responses to #2 above. Wish I could help a bit more, but must defer to my "betters."

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: Does multiple resizing affect quality?
                  Jim_Simon Level 8
                  I've tended to work in my anticipated output res

                   

                  As a general rule, that is bad editing practice.  Always edit in the original resolution of the media.

                   

                  The only exception to that rule is with RED camera media, where the plug-in to handle RED footage actually makes it wiser to work in the intended delivery resolution.

                  • 6. Re: Does multiple resizing affect quality?
                    Karel Bata Level 1

                    Well I guess this is a problem to do with

                     

                    a) those of us who are self-taught, and

                     

                    b) a legacy from the days when computers had probs with video and downsizing was a good way to make them easier to handle. Old habits...

                    • 7. Re: Does multiple resizing affect quality?
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      Yes, as Jim says, start with your original Assets, construct your Project to match, and edit it that way. After you are done, you then determine the delivery scheme and Export to that/those.

                       

                      There are very few exceptions to the above, and Jim hit one of them. The others are not important, as they are very specific and should likely never apply to pure video production.

                       

                      As for the computer, it's best to have a rig that will handle the load. With general prices being what they are, this is pretty much a reality. Back in the days before NLE editing on a desktop, things were different, when editing high-rez still images. The OS's were limiting, the BIOS on MoBo's was limiting. The available sizes and speeds of HDD's were limiting. Still, I kept the resolution as high as possible, paid the extreme price for the necessary gear, and often had to clean all other programs off of the computer, just so I could work in high-rez in Photoshop. Luckily, those days are gone now. Back then, I paid as much for one 1GB SCSI II drive, as all of my 1TB SATA II's cost now!

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt