8 Replies Latest reply on Aug 20, 2009 8:09 AM by the_wine_snob

    Jerky Slow Mo on DVD

    rtprtp Level 1

      Hi Again,

       

      I used the time stretch at 50% to slow mo a scene. It plays beautifully in the monitor in PE7, and amazingly on YouTube after I saved it as a .mov based on a formula I found on this forum (Thanks!) BUT, after burning a DVD, when I play the dvd on my TV the slow mo is less than favorable, I also get the same bad result when I save it as an Mpeg from PE7 Share, and play it on my computer. I thought I would try to burn the .mov to a DVD, but I can't seem to do that. None of my DVD burning programs accept the .mov file. Working in SD. Any solutions?

       

      Thanks, Stan

        • 1. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          I've not had any issues with slo-mo going to DVD, which uses the MPEG-2 CODEC. I also do not recall hearing of this issue with regards to others.

           

          Now, what was the bit-rate (Quality slider) setting for the Transcode? Also, what was the source file that you applied the 50% slo-mo to?

           

          Last what brand of media and what burn speed (if you did the physical burn outside of PrE) that were used?

           

          These aspects can have an impact on how motion can appear on a DVD.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

           

          PS I find that Posterize Time yields better results for me, when altering the "speed" of a Clip. I believe that it is available in PrE, but could be wrong, as most of my work is done in PrPro.

          • 2. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
            rtprtp Level 1

            In PE7 Share, the quality on the DVD menu was set to highest. I am using Sony DVDs. I'll try the Posterizer.

             

            Thanks, ST

            • 3. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              Well, the Sony media gets a lot of praise, and the Quality sounds good. One question: what is the total Duration of your Timeline? As PrE will set the quality to the highest possible and use VBR 2-pass, but the resulting Transcoding will depend on how much material you are trying to fit onto a DVD. If you have a lot of footage, the Transcoding settings will drop to accommodate that on the available space on the disc. With the 2-pass, PrE will attempt to find the sections with the most action to get slightly higher bit-rates for those sections. It's pretty good at doing this. Now, Hollywood looks at every scene, and the operators will use up to 20-pass to get the ultimate quality, for each scene. Their Transcoders cost tens of thousands of dollars, and the operators do noting but Transcode all day. We mere mortals, have to use what we have. Normally, things look pretty good.

               

              As for your question on .MOV files, in the OP, the only file format that is supported for DVD-Video is MPEG-2 and in the proper .VOB container. A .MOV file will only play from a DVD-Data on a computer, or other device that can access and play from a DVD-Data. Now, many authoring apps. can work from a .MOV, but the result will always be an MPEG-2 in a .VOB container (with all the other necessary files), placed into a VIDEO_TS folder on the DVD-Video disc. Sorry that I missed that one earlier.

               

              Also, the source media, your original Clips in the Project can have an impact on the quality of the output. Were these files Captured from a miniDV tape via FireWire into PrE?

               

              Good luck,

               

              Hunt

              • 4. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
                rtprtp Level 1

                Hunt, these clips were captured from a $250 Sony hard disc camcorder via usb. I will be curious if I have any similar issues with my Canon XH A1. I am hoping not. I will run a test.

                 

                Thanks

                • 5. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  OK, the MPEG-2 to MPEG-2 double-compression could be some of the problem. Did you convert the files to DV-AVI Type II, before you Imported them into PrE? The reason that I ask this, is because many NLE's have some issues working with MPEG-2 Assets to begin with. While PrE will internally convert to DV-AVI Type II (to get the necessary full I-frame structure), it is often better to do this outside of PrE, and then edit the newly converted DV-AVI Type II's. Obviously, the data lost between the sensors in the camera with the initial MPEG-2 compression cannot be recovered. When a second MPEG-2 compression is done, motion and clarity can suffer.

                   

                  That would probably not be the best footage to alter the effective Frame Rate on. Let me know if Posterize Time does any better.

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
                    rtprtp Level 1

                    I did not convert the files. I captured them to my hard drive, then brought them into PE7 untouched. I will report back after posterization test.

                    • 7. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
                      rtprtp Level 1

                      Hunt, just wanted you to know that when I played my slow mo DVD on newer TV sets (I'm showing my age) like 16:9 monitors, the slow mo is gorgeous! I am so happy!

                      Thanks for your suggestions, Stan

                      • 8. Re: Jerky Slow Mo on DVD
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        Stan,

                         

                        That is great news!

                         

                        Don't worry about the "age thing." When I was in film school, there were only two ways that one worked with Video: a live feed from the studio camera to a switcher for direct broadcast and a live feed to a 2" Video tape for delayed feed. Other than physically cutting that 2" tape (on a diagonal) and tapeing it back together, the only editing was with the switcher during the live feed. Nothing could be done in the field. There were no tape-to-tape machines invented yet. It was pretty limiting, and didn't look half as good as my film. Even when I had 16mm in the "film chain," the difference in quality between those US$25,000 studio Video cameras and my 16mm was astounding. The 16mm was gorgeous, and the Video was, well... not. Talk about AGE!

                         

                         

                         

                        Good luck,

                         

                        Hunt