9 Replies Latest reply on Aug 16, 2009 12:14 PM by the_wine_snob

    Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)

    drstudio Level 1

      Hi, I'm new to video and Premiere Pro.  I'm looking at the way Premiere Pro displays my video and I have a hunch it thinks my display is calibrated to a gamma of 1.8  Back in the early days that was considered the mac standard but for some years now we've been using 2.2.  I can't see any controls in Premiere Pro to control this, can anyone shed any light on this?

       

      I've been running a color-managed photography workflow for many years based on photoshop, I know video is a completely different beast, just trying to nail down the basics here and get up to speed.  Sorry if I'm overlooking something obvious.

       

      Thanks,

      Dave

        • 1. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          Gamma settings are done in the display driver. Premiere makes no adjustments or assumptions.

          • 2. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
            drstudio Level 1

            Thanks Harm.  How is it then that clips are appearing with a noticeable gamma shift in Premiere Pro?  All the other ways I can view them (QuickTime, iMovie etc) they look normal.

             

            Dave

            • 3. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
              Harm Millaard Level 7

              Dave,

               

              On the PC side players like VLC, WMP and the like can have their own adjustments and if the video driver is set to use the applications settings, that could explain the difference you see. PR however does not have those settings, it uses what the video driver was set to. Maybe on the MAC side things work similarly.

               

              Maybe it is in the name: PC = Perfect Consistency, MAC = Mediocre Alternative Colors.

              • 4. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
                the_wine_snob Level 9
                All the other ways I can view them (QuickTime, iMovie etc) they look normal.

                 

                Dave,

                 

                This could well be due to a difference in how the players are either set, or in the difference between their display and that of PrPro.

                 

                I would guess that you do not have a calibrated (Video) monitor being fed out via FW. Is that correct?

                 

                As a test, you might want to do some test footage, and then author to DVD-Video, playing it on your normal set-top player. Provided that the TV, attached to it, has been reasoably well adjusted, you might get an idea whether iMove and QT are closer to the correct gamma. In most video drivers, on can establish different Presets. Since you have a calibrated print workflow, you will want to keep that, but may have to switch your Custom Preset for Video work. My nVidia allows for many Custom Presets and on-the-fly switching, depending on what I am editing - still in PS, or Video.

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
                  drstudio Level 1

                  Calibrating to 1.8 fixes the problem, I'll verify with an output as you've suggested Hunt, but I'd be surprised if Premiere Pro isn't supposed to be aware of your calibrated state and adjust to it.  That would just be so un-adobe otherwise.

                   

                  With this and my other issue re importing I wonder if the installation went off the rails somehow.  Photoshop CS4 though is running like a charm.

                   

                  Dave

                  • 6. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
                    the_wine_snob Level 9
                    I'd be surprised if Premiere Pro isn't supposed to be aware of your calibrated state and adjust to it.  That would just be so un-adobe otherwise.

                     

                    I agree with you. Adobe goes back so very far with Mac, and PrPro has been around for the Mac for two complete versions now, so I'd be surprised, as well.

                     

                    As most of us have found, calibrating for Video is a moving target. With print work, we can calibrate every step of our workflow. With Video, there is zero control on the display devices, that the viewer will use. For critical density and color work, the properly calibrated CRT monitor is as good as it gets. Hand a perfect DVD off to someone and who know what they'll play it on, or how it is calibrated, if at all. It's a real crapshoot and one can only do their best to hand off something that is "as good as it gets." Same for the Audio too.

                     

                    Good luck, and if you find some controls, settings, that I am just not aware of, please post those for others,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
                      drstudio Level 1

                      I have to say I think now PrPro is giving me the truer picture after pulling up some stills I shot at the same time.  If anything it seems to be more color-aware than the alternatives I'm comparing to.

                       

                      I see what you mean about moving targets, I can't even get it straight on a calibrated system.  Thanks Harm and Hunt for helping me muddle through this.

                       

                      Cheers,

                      Dave

                      • 8. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
                        Harm Millaard Level 7
                        Thanks Harm and Hunt for helping me muddle through this

                         

                        No problem and thanks for your points.

                        • 9. Re: Premiere Pro Display assumptions (Mac)
                          the_wine_snob Level 9

                          Yes, points are always appreciated, especially when one has a "lobster dinner" at the Adobe cafeteria on the line!

                           

                           

                           

                          Hunt