6 Replies Latest reply on Aug 15, 2009 10:48 AM by Jeff Bellune

    Capturing HDV Canon XH-A1 footage to Pro CS3 using Matrox - Help Wanted

    Bobbul

      Hello

       

      I've been reading some of the posts regarding H A1 HDV footage and am still struggling here - please accepy my apolgies for being dim.

       

      A client has asked I film in HD(HDV) but doesn't want the final product to be on Blu Ray - they want to be on normal DVD for the time being, in the hope that if they come back in the future and want the project 'upscaled' onto blu ray - I can do it.

       

      I have a Matrox capture card and so when setting the capture settings I use Matrox HD - but I don't know what options to set after that.I have:

      1440x1080i - 25 fps HDV or MPEG-2 I frame

                          29.97 fps HDV or MPEG 2 I frame

       

      1440x1080p - 23.98 fps HDV only

                           25 fps HDV only

                           29.97 fps HDV only

       

      there is also a 720p option  which highlights various fps options inc 23.98/25/29.97/50/59.94

       

      I'm filming on 50i - does the setting need to be changed to 25p then?

       

      and what setting should i use on CS3 please?

       

      (I have another problem in that my stupid sony bravia 24" which i use to view what i am editing - when i try to view the HDV footage is not recognising it and goes to standby)

       

      Thank you in advance for any hints or suggestions.

       

      Cheers

       

      Rachel

        • 1. Re: Capturing HDV Canon XH-A1 footage to Pro CS3 using Matrox - Help Wanted
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          1440 x 1080i/25 HDV.

           

          The Bravia is connected via firewire/deck/camera?

           

          Matrox has a certain reputation of messing things up, maybe you are better off without it.

          • 2. Re: Capturing HDV Canon XH-A1 footage to Pro CS3 using Matrox - Help Wanted
            Bobbul Level 1

            Hi - thank you for a quick response

             

            The Bravia is conected by an HDMI lead to the base unit.

             

            If I don't use the Matrox - which has never given me any problems with SD, what option would I select then as a capture method - just the normal HDV and then 140/1080i/25 HDV? (and for that then i would also need to film in 25 fps)

             

            Thanks

             

            Rachel

            • 3. Re: Capturing HDV Canon XH-A1 footage to Pro CS3 using Matrox - Help Wanted
              Harm Millaard Level 7

              What video card are you using? Are you using a DVI-HDMI adaptor? How are your displays setup?

               

              My personal preference is to capture HDV with HDVSplit, a freeware utility that does scene detection, allows preview during capture, avoids OOS (out of sync) errors and adds date and timestamp to filenames if desired. In short it does everything that PR should have done from the start, but probably will not do before 2013 with the advent of CS6 and before you have parted with $$$ for what should have been there in the first place.

              • 4. Re: Capturing HDV Canon XH-A1 footage to Pro CS3 using Matrox - Help Wanted
                Bobbul Level 1

                Graphics card is pc1-e with 2 dvi, matrox rt.x2 editing card. If u need more detail i'll need to refer to the specs.

                 

                We use dvi-hdmi cables and a firewire from the camera to the base unit. We have a ben q monitor linked to the base unit that we use as the capture and editing window and the bravia enables us to see the footage as we edit or play from the timeline In pro. Does this help you?

                • 5. Re: Capturing HDV Canon XH-A1 footage to Pro CS3 using Matrox - Help Wanted
                  Jim_Simon Level 8

                  I'm filming on 50i - does the setting need to be changed to 25p then?

                   

                  That is why field rate should NEVER be listed, only frame rate.  50i and 60i cause too much confusion.  Following the rules of video format listing, they actually mean 50 and 60 interlaced frames per second.  And there just is no such thing.  You can have 50 or 60 progressive frames per second, but not interlaced.

                   

                  The i or p let's you know whether or not your dealing with whole frames or two separate fields.  Altering the frame rate listing to also reflect that only confuses the issue.  It's time camera makers stopped this nonsense and followed the rules of format listing.

                   

                  What are those rules, you ask?  Step right up son, and have a Coke as I explain.

                   

                  Proper long format listing is expressed as follows.  Horizontal resolution, the i or p designation, a slash, and than the frame rate.  Like this:

                   

                  480i/30    (normal NTSC video)

                  480p/24   (film like NTSC video)

                  720p/60   (one HD format)

                  1080i/30  (another HD format)

                   

                  Proper short format listing removes the resolution, and places the i or p designation after the frame rate, as so

                   

                  30i   (normal NTSC video)

                  24p  (film like video)

                  60p  (one HD format)

                  30i   (another HD format)

                   

                  You do NOT, when moving the i or p, alter the frame rate to suddenly reflect field rate.

                   

                  Always and only list frame rate.  That is the convention.  When everyone uses it, everyone understands each other.  When camera makers and others violate those rules, confusion abounds.

                   

                  I was very happy to see Adobe step up and do the right thing for their newly added AVCHD presets.  Now we just need to keep that ball rolling...

                  • 6. Re: Capturing HDV Canon XH-A1 footage to Pro CS3 using Matrox - Help Wanted
                    Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                    Jim,

                     

                    Adam Wilt disagrees with you, Wikipedia disagrees with you, and most references that I could find on the Internet default to 1080i60 but acknowledge that 1080i30 is also used.  Even the European Broadcasting Union is proposing that broadcast equipment be upgraded to handle full-frame 1920x1080 images transmitted at 50 Hertz and 60 Hertz.

                     

                    And it is the frequency that is at the heart of the confusion.  Because whether a camera records full frames at 60 Hz or only fields at 60 Hz, it still records at 60 Hz.  In that context, 1080i60 makes sense.

                     

                    Beyond that, though, is the fact that 1080i60 or 1080i30 as a notation is irrelevant.  In the NTSC HD world, there is only one 1080i format, and it's recorded at 60 Hz.  In PAL land, there is only one interlaced HD format and it's recorded at 50 Hz.   There is no confusion if the notation is simply shortened to 1080i and left at that.  It does not matter if you call it 1080i30, 1080i60, 1080i25 or 1080i50 because it's the same thing, and it's the only HD format that's interlaced.

                     

                    Now the progressive formats need a frame-rate designator.  1080p has 2 possible flavors: 24 and 30.  Everyone agrees that 1080p30 and 1080p24 are the proper notations.

                     

                    None of the 720-line formats are interlaced.  All of them are progressive.  So you get three flavors of 720p: 24, 30 and 60.  Everyone agrees that 720p24, 720p30 and 720p60 are the proper notations.

                     

                    I just think that trying to enforce a standard notation to be used with 1080i is a solution that's not only in search of a problem, it's the cause of the problem.

                     

                    -Jeff