5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 17, 2009 10:48 AM by the_wine_snob

    mpeg, flv, merging, rendering, & uploading to youtube

    guy catelli

      my first video upload to youtube, made with a Canon 5D Mk II --  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LI1sDaI0YgE (caution:  PG-13) -- was practically out-of-the-camera.

       

      in my second video (made during the same photoshoot), i deleted the in-camera audio and dubbed in audio from a Zoom H4n (it's underneath the handkerchief, atop the couch and between the two models).

       

      i also added a music soundtrack underneath the models' narration.  but, try as i might, i could not find a "merge" function in the drop-down menus or by right-clicking in various place on the timeline.

       

      i converted the .prel file to an mpeg (which seemed to be the only conversion option), and its size is less than 1/2 GB.

       

      but, because the mpeg seemed quite choppy in playback (and not knowing whether this was merely a problem with my playback software [Quicktime, Windows Media Player, IrfanView, etc]), instead of going to youtube's site and uploading the mpeg file, i used the Pre Elements 7 "export" function directly from the prel file.  this took only about 10 minutes.  however, the file (which youtube says is now .flv) has been "in processing" for the past 36 hours(!)

       

      i'd like to doing a merge with the underlying prel file, and see if that helps.

       

      how do i do this?

        • 1. Re: mpeg, flv, merging, rendering, & uploading to youtube
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          You've got a number of issues going on there, guy. Much of it related to the fact that you're trying to edit video from a still camera in Premiere Elements -- which usually just won't go. Or, if it does go, commonly gives you lots of problems (as you've seen).

           

          The other main issue is that you're getting confused by file sizes. Because no two video formats use the same compression systems, you're going to see a lot of variation in video sizes. And, because Premiere Elements uses a DV-AVI workflow, whatever you put into the program becomes a DV-AVI before it becomes anything else -- and DV-AVIs are about 400-500 megabytes per minute! In other words, the video from your camcorder may be 1 megabyte but, after you run it through a video editor, it may come out 5 or 10 times that size.

           

          Anyway, the long and short of it all is this: You can't use the video directly from that camera in Premiere Elements. Convert it to a DV-AVI using a program like Prism and your weirdness problems will go away.

          http://forums.adobe.com/thread/415317?tstart=0

           

          But have lots of hard drive space! You'll need many gigabytes of free, defragmented space to edit DV-AVIs!

           

          (An alternative is to pick up a program called Quicktime Pro, $29 from Apple. Basically a video processor, it can also edit MOVs natively, and may be able to do what you want it to do without any of the liabilities of a full-blown video editor.)

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: mpeg, flv, merging, rendering, & uploading to youtube
            guy catelli Level 1

            thanks, Steve.  i have Quicktime Pro, so when i edit the next segment, i'll certainly convert to avi from the outset.

             

            meanwhile, is there some way to merge the 3 tracks i have in the current prel file?

            • 3. Re: mpeg, flv, merging, rendering, & uploading to youtube
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              Let's do a bit of background work first.

               

              The .PREL file is but an XML database of the Project in PrE. It contains zero media. It only contains links to the media used, and instructions on what to do with it. That is all. It can only be used in PrE, or with a few exceptions, in PrPro. It can be opened in an XML, or word processing program, but all one can do in either is view, or edit those links and insturctions - nothing else.

               

              Now, with that .PREL file open in PrE, and the media available and in the exact location that it was, when the Project was last saved, you CAN edit with it.

               

              The output will be a media file, not as a .PREL (though you will want to save that, if work has been done, so you can come back to that Project later). The format of that output (either Export, or Share), will be of your choice, per your needs. It will likely be something like an .AVI, .MOV, .MPEG or FLV file, and can be played on an appropriate player. The Export/Share must be done, to get the Project into a "container," that can be used by other programs.

               

              For your Canon 5D MK II, your files are in .MOV format, but with a few differences, compared to many .MOV files. There are several useful discussions on the Adobe Premiere CS4 forum, regarding those particular .MOV files. A search on "Canon 5D MK II," and variations, will yield about six, IIRC. They will be very informative.

               

              Now, in PrPro (PrE's "big-brother") I've edited sample 5D MK II .MOV files, as a test for others. I have not tried with PrE, so do not know the limitations. However, Steve's rec. to convert outside of PrE is a good one. I do this for most non-DV-AVI Type II material. Note: with the exception of tests for others, I only edit SD material, so I do not work with all of the HD formats and CODEC's. QT Pro does a good job, when starting from .MOV and .MP4 formats, with many common CODEC's, that are used in those files. I use it as a conversion tool for much work. It is much more than just a "player."

               

              As for the "merging" of the Audio, that is done by PrE. Basically, when you Export/Share, PrE downmixes all Audio to a single Master. In PrE, this WILL be a stereo downmix. The exact format/CODEC of that downmix will depend on the settings of your Export/Share. To get an idea of this, open up Window>Audio Mixer. You will see all of your Audio Tracks, and will also see the Master to the far-right of that Panel. That is your downmix. While there are other ways to adjust the Audio Tracks for that downmix to the Master, I use, and recommend that one use, the Audio Mixer for the final settings in the downmix to the Master. It allows for some automation (at a Track level) and also almost infinite control. I keep it open in all of my PrPro Projects, and would not be without it. Take a look at it, while you play, and you will see a visual representation of you downmix to the Master.

               

              Hope that this helps.

               

              Good luck,

               

              Hunt

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: mpeg, flv, merging, rendering, & uploading to youtube
                guy catelli Level 1

                Hunt, that was very helpful in providing an overview -- thanks so much.

                 

                this weekend i edited a second video clip from my Toronto photoshoot with, from left to right, Audrey and Kelli (the first clip is here:  [url]http://www.youtube.com/user/guycatelli#play/all/uploads-all/1/LI1sDaI0YgE[/url] [32 seconds]) -- as i plod along the (somewhat steep) learning curve of Abobe Premiere Elements 7.

                 

                unlike the first clip, in the second clip i stripped away the audio track created by the Canon 5D Mk II and dubbed in its place audio from a Zoom H4n.  (the Zoom H4n comes with a user manual in English that is almost unintelligible; Premiere Elements 7 comes with no user manual at all.)  the H4n was placed underneath a white handkerchief that can be seen behind Audrey and Kelli.

                 

                (i synched the audio dub with the video more with prayer than with science.)

                 

                i added two title boards at the beginning (it's easy to add just one, but adding two, if, like me, you don't know what you're doing, requires a weird workaround), and i added another one at the end. 

                 

                i also brightened the video, added some contrast, and made the color warmer.  as a result, there is some banding, especially on the wall in the background.

                 

                a key to simplying matters was to *not* use the Premiere Elmts 7 direct-upload-to-youtube feature, but instead to save directly to the HDD in Adobe Flash Video (.flv) format, and then upload that to youtube.  this compressed a file that was about 1.5GB to a mere 15MB (100:1 compression, yet High Definition is still preserved[!]), which made everything a lot faster.

                 

                in the clip, Kelli talks about the foot fetishist who sent her emails "for years and years and years".  since he lives in Toronto and knows what she looks like from her television commercials and her website, it was scary.  here's the clip:  [url]http://www.youtube.com/user/guycatelli#play/all/uploads-all/0/6zirb-yMVRc[/url] [2-1/2 minutes]

                • 5. Re: mpeg, flv, merging, rendering, & uploading to youtube
                  the_wine_snob Level 9
                  (i synched the audio dub with the video more with prayer than with science.)

                   

                  Cannot recall if I posted the link to this ARTICLE on OOS/Syncing. If so, please just ignore. If not, there might be something useful in it.

                   

                  I also brightened the video, added some contrast, and made the color warmer.  as a result, there is some banding, especially on the wall in the background.

                   

                  Which Effects exactly, did you apply to the Clips? I find that most of Adobe's Auto Effects cause issues, even when the lighting stays almost perfect throughout the Clip. I rely heavily on the non-Auto versions, but PrE does not have as many of those, as does PrPro. One thing that I have never done is to copy these over from PrPro to see if they will work in PrE. Maybe when I get some time and want to experiment. Still, that would not help most, unless they also had PrPro. If they did, I'd assume that all Effects would be added in Pro, and would be the full-manual versions, not the Auto equivilents.

                   

                  a key to simplying matters was to *not* use the Premiere Elmts 7 direct-upload-to-youtube feature, but instead to save directly to the HDD in Adobe Flash Video (.flv) format, and then upload that to youtube.  this compressed a file that was about 1.5GB to a mere 15MB (100:1 compression, yet High Definition is still preserved[!]), which made everything a lot faster.

                   

                  Many have been disappointed in going directly from PrE to YouTube. Much of this has to do with YouTube constantly changing what they want. Then, when they did the changeover to Google accounts, things really got sideways. Maybe YouTube will finally settle on their specs, and on their upload formats, and the next version of PrE can stay current for more than a moment in time... Or, maybe not.

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt