9 Replies Latest reply on Aug 18, 2009 9:06 PM by Mylenium

    How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?

    Impulse Fire Level 1

      Okay well i have a quad core q9650 CPU and i just want to make sure thatAAE is using its full potential to render videos. ive seen videos on youtube where people with my smae cpu render things in 20 seconds while mine takes at least a minute. my Graphics card is an HD 4870 1 GB so im good with that but idk i always render in 720p 1280x720 format  and idk it just seems to take longer than other people. my friend at his house has the quad core 2.66 im not sure how he configured his AAE but he renders stuff faster than me with a worse graphics card and i wanna know how to change those settings.

        • 1. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
          David Wigforss-Hv1BNN Level 2

          Try enabling multiprocessing in prefs.

           

          You'll want a 64bit OS and a lot of ram (8 gig or more).

          • 2. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
            yenaphe Level 4

            Well your graphic card isn't what can really make a huge difference in AE.

             

            Ram and raw processor power more likely. If you want to use all your cores you have to enable multiprocessessing in the preferences but in order for AE to work correctly, you must at least have 2gb per core activated inside AE.

             

            So 4 cores = 8gb of ram. On a similar configuration, i tend to use only 3 cores to leave 1 for other apps, and use 7gb of ram (on my 8) for AE. Run smooth.

             

            Also, faster disks are better, and never reading/writing from the same disk speeds up thinghs sinificantly.

            • 3. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
              Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

              As the others said - lots of RAM and a 64bit operating system are favorable when working with AE. In addition, with lots of footage being used, faster disks are important. That aside, blind comparisons of differnt systems without actually having a standardized project setup usually have little value. If you do not use multiprocessing on your machine, naturally you lose. Per-core efficiency is better on a dual core than it is on a quad core and any scenario that only uses a single core (temporal effects, OpenGL rendering, non-MP CoDec issues etc.) will therefore work to your disadvantage. Still, in a production environment your quad core could be the winner on another day when it can play out its strengths. As they say - your mileage may vary, but you should not go crazy over it, especially now that you have the machine. Such considerations at best might have/ should have influenced your buying decision before, but now you have to work with what you have and things might look already different with CS5.

               

              Mylenium

              • 4. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
                Impulse Fire Level 1

                k thanks i got only 4 gb's of RAM and vista 64 bit i guess i could upgrade but 4 gbs would not be enough to make it faster? Anyways i have also noticed after Effects cant import Mpeg 4 videoi rendered out a 25 minute  video in mpeg-4 in Vegas for like 1.5  hours. and when i tried to import to AAE it said it wsnt compatible. i was almost positive that it could any help there?

                • 5. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
                  Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee

                  With 4 GB of RAM, you could use 2 of the 4 available cores in your computer. Go to Preferences > Memory and multiprocessing, turn on "Render Multiple Frames Simultaneously" and in the same preference page, set CPUs to leave free to "2". This way you would keep the notion of having 2 GB of RAM per rendering instance. Having an extra 4 GB of RAM would be the best thing in the long term.

                  There are several different profiles of MPEG-4 video. In any case, it's a highly compressed and very processor intensive format, which makes it far from ideal  when going from one application to another.

                  • 6. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
                    Impulse Fire Level 1

                    Oh i see thanks   also 1 other questio i had was what would be the best codec for rendering decently long footage like say maybe about a minute for under 100 mb's in HD format preferably 720p i love using quicktime because its a great codec but im not sure what format of it i should use all of them seem to take insane amounts of space. and ive heard good things about h.264 but theres no HD without choosing blu ray and that sadly splits the audio. any tips on good codecs?

                    • 7. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
                      Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee

                      I don't think 100 MB is realistic for a minute of HD video at production quality. Bear in mind that a 500 GB hard drive sells for next to nothing nowadays.

                      Quicktime PNG is a really excellent, completely lossless option which will take less space and look just as good as uncompressed. But I guess it would take over 1 GB for a minute of HD video.

                      Quicktime Photo JPEG is lossy, but still very, very good at a fraction of the size (I'd expect it to be well over 500 MBs).

                       

                      H264 is the advanced flavor of MPEG-4. It's outstanding as a delivery/distribution codec (ie, to make compressed versions for people to watch). It's even more processor intensive than plain MPEG-4, so I wouldn't use it as an exchange format. If you still want to use it, you could pick the default H264 (not Blu-Ray) preset and raise the data rate to 20-30 Megabits per second.

                      • 8. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
                        Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

                        You have to weigh the file size against other potential disadvantages. H.264 may produce smaller files, but is more processor intensive to encode and decode, which in effect would again increase rendering times and slow down work while you edit your projects. Quicktime PNG, Animation and PhotoJPEG are good for 8bit footage as movie clips, for higher bit depths (16bpc and 32bpc) you will have to resort to image sequences. For that, compressed TIFF, PSD and OpenEXR files are the best option. Especially EXR files can be ridiculously small, in fact oftentimes EXR sequences are only one third of the file size of a comparable quicktime movie.

                         

                        Mylenium

                        • 9. Re: How to make sure AAE uses All my cores?
                          Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

                          One more thought regarding my previous comment: Image sequences would also be beneficial for multiprocessing rendering, as frames can be processed out of sequence....

                           

                          Mylenium