5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 27, 2009 9:54 PM by Wade_Zimmerman

    Couple of questions: Migration from Corel X3 and graphics cards

    Rob Guinness Man

      Hello all,

       

      I have to supply new Macs to a design company that are currently using PCS with Corel Draw X3.

       

      The want to migrate them to Illustrator CS4. Are there any major issues to migrate the work from X3 to Illustrator CS4? Any links,documents or comments most appreciated.

       

      The Macs I'm thinking of supplying are Mac Pro Quad Core 2.66ghz with 6GB and a NVIDA GT 120 Grpahics card. The move some pretty big designs so I don't want to get my fingers burnt by supplying a underrated system. Will the graphics card and RAM be ok? Or should I go for more? Whats recommended?

       

      Thanks,

       

      Rob

        • 1. Re: Couple of questions: Migration from Corel X3 and graphics cards
          Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

          The want to migrate them to Illustrator CS4. Are there any major issues to migrate the work from X3 to Illustrator CS4?

           

          That's not even remotely funny. The two usually don't go together at all. Corel claims having reverse-engineered the CS3 Illustrator format and thus being able to export it from X4, but that has a truck load of question marks attached with regards to what features are supported, so I'd not rely on that at all. And your client doesn't even have X4, does he not?  That being so, it probably takes your client back to the stone age, having to use old AI 88 files, EPS and uneditable PDFs to "exchange" data from their current CorelDraw files to Illustrator. And of course, unless they already have those converted files handy, they will have to fire up their old licenses more than once a day via Bootcamp or Parallels even if they get shiny new Macs. If you get my meaning, and forgive me my choice of words, on some level it's hairbrained and shortsighted. There simply cannot be such a thing as a flip-a-switch instant migration in that case. They'd do much better sticking with PCs and adding Illustrator to the software, then in 2 years revisit the topic when the bulk of their current work is then already in AI format, which they created during their normal workflow processes, not some extra longwinded conversion efforts. As for your Macs - more RAM! You can never go wrong with that and it's dirt cheap these days (if not bought from Apple). Even if AI will not go native 64bit with CS5 from what it looks, you can bet on it that it will have optimizations to benefit from Snow Leopard's new features and will work better on a system that does not suffocate. AI itself will use 4 GB at most being a 32bit app, but consider, that, if indeed your client is a heavy pusher as you claim, they may like the idea of having multiple apps open and of course OSX wants its share as well. Graphics card is not important at all for AI. it does not use any accelerated functions. It would matter for photoshop and some otehr apps, though. Still, my original point remains: It doesn't really make sense, if your client wants to take along all his existing artwork. I'd have a sit and talk with him about that and especially figure out that file conversion thing by using the PC-based trial of Illustrator and CorelDraw X4. Everything else could end in disaster and the two of you being at each other's throat.

           

          Mylenium

          • 2. Re: Couple of questions: Migration from Corel X3 and graphics cards
            Rob Guinness Man Level 1

            Thanks for the in depth reply. Makes thing a lot clearer. Ok, So the hardware is pretty much understood, just leaves the software.

             

            If my client migrates from CorelDraw X3 to CorelDraw X4 will this ease the process a little? Or do you stand by your first comment, running in parallel CorelDraw and Illustrator and slowly generating new work in Illustrator.

             

            Cheers,

             

            Rob

            • 3. Re: Couple of questions: Migration from Corel X3 and graphics cards
              Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

              If my client migrates from CorelDraw X3 to CorelDraw X4 will this ease the process a little? Or do you stand by your first comment, running in parallel CorelDraw and Illustrator and slowly generating new work in Illustrator.

               

              Both. They should upgrade to X4 on one or 2 machines and on those machines also have Illustrator. That way they can try out the alleged "native" exchange of CS3 files and whenever something comes in from the otehr machines gradually build an archive of already ready to use AI files from their CDRs. It will cost them of course some extra money now to get the softwares, but it can't be helped, assuming they are serious about switching to AI.

               

              Mylenium

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              • 4. Re: Couple of questions: Migration from Corel X3 and graphics cards
                JETalmage Level 6

                The amount of difficulty you will encounter depends entirely on the nature of the artwork originally created in Draw. Just as Illustrator has some native constructs which do not have a direct counterpart in Draw, the inverse is just as true. The same would be true between any pair of drawing programs.

                 

                For example: Suppose a company is in the business of creating vector artwork clipart that never consists of anything more involved than simple and/or compound paths using solid fills and strokes, tints, and simple grads. It's entirely conceivable that such a company could batch-convert its files to AI format without a hitch.

                 

                On the other hand, suppose the company has some illustrators who use every Corel-proprietary construct in the program. Draw, for one very basic example, provides live shape primitives--ellipses, stars, polygons, rectangles, rounded rectangles (not to mention many other shapes with live shape parameters). Illustrator is about the only drawing program on the planet that still lacks that very basic functionality. So no matter how "perfect" Corel's (or anyone else's) export filter is done, it's going to be impossible for those constructs to survive the trip without getting dumbed-down to brain-dead simple paths that Illustrator understands. Illustrator simply has nothing to translate that kind of very common object into.

                 

                So if the company's creative staff expects that kind of stuff to survive the trip with all the native functionality intact, they're in for one big disalppointment. Same thing goes for many other kinds of constructs: Live Dmension lines. Live Connector lines. Custom ruler scales. Custom arrowheads. Grad types beyond simple linear and radial. Live Extrusions. Lens Fills. Live Contours. Uniformly-spaced PathBlends. Adjustable accelleration of Blends. Live Perspective Grids. Object Data. Text with Drop Caps. Text with inline graphics. The list goes on.

                 

                If any of that stuff (and more) is expected to remain live and editable after export to AI format, the users are in for a rude surprise, because Illustrator has no native direct equivalent. So it all has to be broken down to groups of simpler, more basic objects. That's not the fault of the export filter.

                 

                Why would the company feels compelled to "switch" from one to the other? Is there some law against having two applications on one computer? Just leave your native Draw files as native Draw files. Put Illustrator on the machienes and instruct the users to create new projects in it (if they must; although I don't know why). If a Draw file "has" to be converted, do it on an as-needed basis.

                 

                Look: both Draw and Illustrator can both output to print-suitable PDF, as can most any decent print graphics program. Let the users use what they know and like. (Better, let them use the best tool for the particular project; and teach them how to know.) Keep your archives in their native format and translate them as-needed.

                 

                As for hardware platform, one simple question: What is the compelling reason?

                 

                JET

                • 5. Re: Couple of questions: Migration from Corel X3 and graphics cards
                  Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

                  I respect both of these guys but they are being very optimistic by comparison to what you might encounter.

                   

                  What I would do is to first get a copy of Corel 4 and one copy of PS CS4 put them on a machine and see how this work flow goes.

                   

                  I would try to save these out as ai, pdf and eps and see which works best and see if anything actually does work.

                   

                  There are services that can successfully convert your files to ai.