13 Replies Latest reply on Sep 6, 2009 8:28 AM by JETalmage

    CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?

    Travis444 Level 1

      Hey Guys,

       

      I hope that you can help me out with this one.

      I want to know how much RAM I need to make this work.

       

      I have a 24,810 KB Illustrator File.

      The file has a large embeded image that I have applied a Gaussian Blur to.

      The problem arrises when I try to save the file after enlarging the embeded image with the Gaussian Blur.

       

      After a little bit of a wait I get the same message

      "The application ran out of virtual memory.

      Please close some windows to free memory"

       

      I have no windows opened at this time.

      Currently my laptop has 1.9 G's of RAM.

      I have placed 2 more gigs of ram in it and still have the same problem.

       

      I have a HP 550

      Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU

      t5670 @ 1.80GHz

      1.79 GHz, 1.99 GB of RAM

       

      How much RAM do I need for the image file to work and be saved?

       

      Thanks

      Travis

        • 1. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
          John Danek Level 4

          One thing I'd take a look at is available scratch disk space ( Illustrator > Preferences > Scratch Disk ).  This is usually your startup disk and a choice of other availble hard drive(s) and/or space.  As you work, especially bitmap affects, you are saving to and taking memory from scratch disks.  When your available chunks become too small because of fragmentation, Illustrator runs out of space to write to.  Applications like Disk Warrior or similar can free up space through a defrag and optimization process.  If I'm not mistaken, virtual RAM comes from hard disk space, not RAM.

           

          As far as RAM goes, you need to max out on RAM.  It has been recommended that you triple the file size for RAM cinsiderations.  For your 25 mb file, that would be 75mgs of RAM.  That should be doable with your current RAM, but stuff the machine with as much RAM as it can hold.  Laptops are limited.  But, if you can, double it to 4gigs, 8 would be better, and 16 would be even better.  Do not forget, the OS uses a minimum of 512mgs these days, 1 gig is typical and 2gigs is quickly becoming a reality.  If you have 2g's, that doesn't leave alot left over for fun stuff like Illustrator.

          • 2. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
            Harron K. Appleman Level 4

            Unless you actually need its capabilities (e.g., you need to manage file versions in a collaborative environment), disable Version Cue. You can do this from Bridge or within any CS application via preferences.

             

            If you have the opportunity or necessity to reinstall your suite, do so without installing Version Cue.

             

            You can always increase virtual memory by assigning more hard drive space to it (in Windows), but that isn't the problem here, the error message notwithstanding.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
              Larry G. Schneider Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              What is the Document Raster Effects settng for the file? What is the use and overall size of the file? Try setting the Dcoument Raster Effects to 72 dpi and see what happens.

              • 4. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                Travis444 Level 1

                "Harron K. Appleman: Unless you actually need its capabilities (e.g., you need to manage file versions in a collaborative environment), disable Version Cue. You can do this from Bridge or within any CS application via preferences.

                 

                If you have the opportunity or necessity to reinstall your suite, do so without installing Version Cue.

                 

                You can always increase virtual memory by assigning more hard drive space to it (in Windows), but that isn't the problem here, the error message notwithstanding."

                 

                This allowed me to finally save the illustrator file as a PDF.

                After that my laptop likes to freeze up on me.

                Thanks for the help thought one step closer none the less.

                 

                Thanks Harron

                 

                Travis

                • 5. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                  Travis444 Level 1

                  John Danek

                  Ok I have opened up Illustartor>Edit>Preferences>Scratch Disk.

                  It says

                  Scratch Disks

                  • Primary: Startup
                  • Seconday: None

                   

                  Is this what I want it to say?

                   

                  Also I have 2gs of RAM on my HP550.

                  When I added 2g's more RAM it would only read 3g's total RAM.

                  That sucks to think there could be such a low limit to the amount of RAM I can have on this thing.

                   

                  Thanks John

                   

                  Travis

                  • 6. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                    Harron K. Appleman Level 4

                    This allowed me to finally save the illustrator file as a PDF.

                    After that my laptop likes to freeze up on me.

                    Well... I guess that's progress. The freeze-up shouldn't be happening, of course.

                     

                    Your best bet might be a thorough uninstall/reinstall without Version Cue. Let the various updaters do their thing and, in the case of Illustrator, get you up to 13.0.2.

                     

                    When I added 2g's more RAM it would only read 3g's total RAM.

                    That's a (32-bit) Windows limitation. Nothing you can really do about that. Which Windows version are you using?

                    • 7. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                      Travis444 Level 1

                      Larry G. Schneider

                      "What is the Document Raster Effects settng for the file? What is the use and overall size of the file?

                      Try setting the Dcoument Raster Effects to 72 dpi and see what happens."

                       

                      If I set it to 72 ppi is that going to effect the quality of the printed product?

                      I would not mind setting it to 72 ppi if it only affects the how the image is displayed on the screen.

                      But the document I am working on is going to be printed and I like to have it set at 300 ppi.

                      Right now it is set to 300 ppi in CMYK mode.

                       

                      Thanks,

                       

                      Travis

                      • 8. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                        John Danek Level 4

                        Yes, your primary is going to be the startup disk.  I have my hardrive partitioned, so primary is startup and secondary is a dedicated partition for scratch. If you have a similar setup or have an external drive available, you could use it as a secondary scratch disk.

                         

                        If you double your RAM to 4g's and you only report 3g's, I wonder if one of the modules is not totally seated and your missing out on 1g.  You should get a total of 4gigs.  That should be sufficient.  Check it out.  Take a close look at the RAM modules and make sure they are pressed in all the way.

                        • 9. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                          Harron K. Appleman Level 4
                          If you double your RAM to 4g's and you only report 3g's, I wonder if one of the modules is not totally seated and your missing out on 1g.  You should get a total of 4gigs.

                           

                          Even though BIOS may report 4GB of installed RAM, 32-bit Windows will only report (and can only manage) a tad over 3GB of RAM. 64-bit Windows is another matter.

                          • 10. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                            John Danek Level 4

                            Thanks for the info.  I didn't know that.  Bummer.

                            • 11. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                              Travis444 Level 1
                              That's a (32-bit) Windows limitation. Nothing you can really do about that. Which Windows version are you using?

                              Even though my computer came with vista.

                              My company has made sure everyone is useing windows XP.

                              So I only have window's XP Professional on this laptop.

                               

                              Your best bet might be a thorough uninstall/reinstall without Version Cue.
                              Let the various updaters do their thing and, in the case of Illustrator, get you up to 13.0.2.

                              I would have reinstalled the program by now but I cannot get my hands on the installation CD's.

                              The guy in charge of that stuff has not been in the office the last few days.

                              WIth that said I cannot get the CD's to uninstall then reinstall CS3

                              • 12. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                                Travis444 Level 1
                                Even though BIOS may report 4GB of installed RAM, 32-bit Windows will only report (and can only manage) a tad over 3GB of RAM. 64-bit Windows is another matter.

                                I'm pretty sure that the OS is limiting the amount of ram that can be placed on the PC.

                                I have installed both RAM cards in seperatly and seperatly they each read 2gigs.

                                Next I put them both in but switch their locations.

                                i.e. The RAM card on top was installed at the bottom, and the RAM card at the bottom was moved to the top.

                                 

                                either way my PC will only read 2.99 gigs of RAM.

                                • 13. Re: CS3 "Ran out of virtual memory"?
                                  JETalmage Level 6
                                  If I set it to 72 ppi is that going to effect the quality of the printed product?

                                   

                                  Probably not. What is the halftone ruling at which the project will be printed? (And do you know why that matters?)

                                   

                                  You said you are applying a Gaussian Blur Effect, correct? The purpose of a blurr effect is to...well,...blur the image, right?

                                   

                                  This near-universal fixation on "everything raster has to be 300ppi" never ceases to amuse me. (This same issue is related to several other active threads in this forum, and reflects a widespread misconception about a "rule" that is really supposed to be nothing more than a general rule-of-thumb.)

                                   

                                  Look:

                                   

                                  Why do you try to have your raster images scaled so that their effective resolution is 300ppi in the first place? It's to avoid visible "pixelation" in the printed output.

                                   

                                  What is "pixelation"? It's that ugly pattern that appears when individual raster image pixels are printed so large that their square shape becomes discernable.

                                   

                                  How large can a pixel be printed without its square shape being discernable? No one knows, because it depends on the image. For example: Assume it's a raster image of a 1" red square. The raster image could be 1ppi and it would look no worse than a 3000ppi raster image when printed at 100%.

                                   

                                  But we do know this: Color and grayscale images are usually printed using halftone dots. Halftone dots are round. If a single square pixel has to be represented by a single round halftone dot, there is no way the squareness of the pixel is going to be evident, because the halftone dot doesn't have a fine-enough "resolution" to faithfully render the detail of the square pixel.

                                   

                                  That's the basis of the rule-of-thumb. And the rule-of-thumb is not "Make everything 300ppi." It's "Scale the raster image so that its effective ppi is 1-to-2 times the halftone screen ruling at which it will be printed."

                                   

                                  Note the rule-of-thumb is a range (1 to 2). The fact is, 1.5 x the halftone ruling is squarely in the middle of that range, and in most cases is just fine. Assuming the image is properly sharpened and is not scaled after placing on the page, I dare say there is no discernable advantage in bumping its ppi to 2x the halftone ruling.

                                   

                                  The silly "must be 300ppi" misconception stems from these assumed factors:

                                  • 150 lpi is arguably the most commonly-used halftone screen ruling in offset lithography.
                                  • 300 ppi allows for a reasonable "leeway" for those who plop a raster image onto a page layout, and then scale it somewhat on the page after importing it.

                                  But assuming you take the time to know the actual on-page size of the image before importing it, and therefore do not perform on-page transformations of it after importing, 300 ppi is actually gracious plenty for printing at a halftone ruling of 200 lpi. 225 ppi would do just as well in the vast majority of situations wherein the designer thinks he "must" have 300ppi.

                                   

                                  Consider also:

                                   

                                  Common sense dictates that the larger the printed piece, the lower the probable halftone ruling. Trade show posters, for example, are designed to be viewed from a distance. So 133, 120, or even 100 lpi halftone may be quite common. Billboards certainly are not printed at 150 lpi. What would be the point? The thing is 50' in the air! The viewer can't get closer to it than 50'. There's no way the viewer is going to see the halftone dots.

                                   

                                  Now back to your blur:

                                   

                                  Since you know the finest pattern that a viewer is going to be able to discern on the printed piece is the pattern of the halftone dots themselves, it must then follow that as long as the pattern inherent in the pixels is at least as fine as that of the halftone dots, then the pattern of the pixels will not be at all discernable. Moreover, since you are talking specifically about a portion of the artwork which you want to be blurry (same principle applies to drop-shadows) you can probably even get away with a raster ppi that is less than the halftone lpi.

                                   

                                  That's why Larry suggested setting the Raster Effects setting to 72ppi. Ask yourself: "In this image, will the viewer be able to discern the edges of squares that are 1/72" in measure, given that (because they are in an intentionally blurred image) adjacent pixels will be very near the same color?"

                                   

                                  JET

                                  1 person found this helpful