5 Replies Latest reply on Sep 7, 2009 10:57 PM by Mylenium

    FLV Editing in Adobe Products?

    LippyLippy

      Hi Gang,

      I am currently producing/hosting a TEQUILA reviews LIVE streaming webcast  ( http://tequilawhisperer.com ) .  I use the Flash Live Media Encoder to create my stream.  I'm wondering if "After Effects" allows native editing of the .FLV file?  If Not, does "Premiere"?

       

      I'm a Flash animator who is looking for an excuse to learn "AE", so I'd RATHER do my .flv video editing (mostly straight - forward linear classic fillm editing) in that program if possible.

       

      Thanks for any help here!

       

      -Lippy

      www.lippy.com

        • 1. Re: FLV Editing in Adobe Products?
          yenaphe Level 4

          Be aware that AE is NOT an editing program, so it will be really cumbersome to use it to edit stuff. For instance you don't have realtime previews, you need to do ram previews before, so i'd definitively switch to Premiere Pro.

          • 2. Re: FLV Editing in Adobe Products?
            Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee

            Lippy: Both After Effects and Premiere Pro will let you import FLV files. However, it's important to state that FLV was designed to be a distribution format, not a production format. Because of this, in an editing application like Premiere Pro you will see yourself rendering all the time just to visualize your work. If you consider that FLV is not a production format, you may prefer to convert the content (or produce it from scratch) in production-friendly formats such as Quicktime or AVI, and then ouput a FLV file as the end result. If you absolutely requre to import FLV content, then yes you can do it, but it's not ideal.

            • 3. Re: FLV Editing in Adobe Products?
              LippyLippy Level 1

              Thanks so much for the help, Guys.  Let me be even a bit more clear if I can:

               

              I have created .FLV content from the auto-recordings of the LIVE streaming shows I'm doing.  I *could* re-save the .FLV's as QT or .avis and then edit them, but doesn't the change in format (to QT or .avi) add another layer of compression (and therefore artifacts and a degredation of the image/audio) to the final file?

               

              Thanks again!

              • 4. Re: FLV Editing in Adobe Products?
                Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee
                I *could* re-save the .FLV's as QT or .avis and then edit them, but doesn't the change in format (to QT or .avi) add another layer of compr

                Yes, but if you use an uncompressed, lossless or gently lossy codec when creating this intermediate files, you're avoiding that kind of degradation.

                For AE, this wouldn't be necessary, because AE is not an editing application and it's not real time anyway. For an editing application, keeping things working in real time for editing operations is very important, and in that case such a workflow would be recommended. You'll see that Premiere Pro (or any other editing application for that matter) doesn't come with any factory presets to set it to edit FLV. This is because it's not a standardized workflow, in an environment where real time editing is so important.

                • 5. Re: FLV Editing in Adobe Products?
                  Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

                  If you record life shows, you should consider changing your workflow. To me it sounds like you need a way to do dual streams/ dual format recording, which is more or less a matter of buying some hardware (NewTek VideoToaster Live, Perception etc.). You could then keep around an uncompressed/ only mildly compressed version for editing. On a powerful enough computer it may be even possible to get something like that as a software-only solution, I'm just not familiar enough with the topic. when we do support for shows and events, we always hire expensive pro equipment and that usually "just works". Of course the otehrs are right - FLV is not particularly editing friendly. Funnily, you'd be having an easier time if you recorded your stuff as H.264. At least that can be edited natively in some programs (Vegas, Final Cut Pro)...

                   

                  Mylenium