5 Replies Latest reply on Sep 18, 2009 9:04 AM by Navarro Parker

    Rendering print resolution files -- out of memory, out of luck?

    Navarro Parker Level 3

      Hey guys!

       

      Trying to render a 7500x5000 pixel image for a print piece. And not surprisingly, I'm getting out of memory buffer errors. Am I just out of luck trying to render something so massive out of AE (until it goes 64bit)? Trying to render just a small ROI isn't working either.

        • 1. Re: Rendering print resolution files -- out of memory, out of luck?What does the comp contain?
          Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

          What does the comp contain and on what system? The size as such should be not the issue. Yes, it's at the edge of what Ae can handle, but it should be possible. It may just depend on a certain memory hungry feature or effect. Does it render, if you reduce the resolution just a bit, say 500 pixels in both directions? If not at native resolution, you may be able to render it just a tad smaller, then use smart resizing plug-ins like Genuine Fractals in Photoshop to go the rest of the distance. What is the target, anyway? Perhaps you do not even need the large resolution....

           

          Mylenium

          • 2. Re: Rendering print resolution files -- out of memory, out of luck?What does the comp contain?
            yenaphe Level 4

            As Mylenium said, what are your systeme specs. More importantely how much ram de you have, on what AE version do you have ?

             

            Have you tried the secret menu to get rid of ram caching (press Shift while opening the pref dialog an then release shift) ?

            • 3. Re: Rendering print resolution files -- out of memory, out of luck?What does the comp contain?
              Navarro Parker Level 3

              Yes it will render if I lower the bit depth to 8bpc. But I really want 32bpc HDR glows and overbrights. Turning it to 8-bit kills all my glows and beautiful additive effects. It just looks dead. The project is a backdrop to a trade show booth. I'm just going off the specs the print shop has given me which seem reasonable (I think it's 12'x8' at 50 dpi). Obviously it's going to get converted down to 8bpc or 16bpc CMYK eventually, but I want these effects processed in float.

               

              Running CS4 with 16GB of RAM. I've tried turning MP off and on while giving AE the maximum amount of RAM it will allow. I think Mylenium is right. It's just on the outer edge of what AE can handle -- and the 32bpc is just too much it.

               

              Genuine Fractals might be the way to go.  At least until AE goes 64-bit.

              • 4. Re: Rendering print resolution files -- out of memory, out of luck?What does the comp contain?
                Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

                Well, no offense, but I think you are going about the wrong way. Once it is printed, it will look "dull", anyway. Instead of rendering it 32bit, you should render it in 8bit, but adjust it so it looks like your 32bit project. Anything that cannot be matched, wouldn't most likely be possible to print, anyway. CMYK has a much lower gamut in many tonal ranges, and even specific photo inks do not change that. It is basically just a 9bit/10bit color space. If you render in 32bit, the following is going to happen: You will have all your wonderful colors, but once converted to CMYK, e.g. the reds will not look red and any subtle glows and such will be banding heavily - either they are below the gamut and simply print as white, or they contain mix colors that are impossible to correct out to get pure colors again. So by all means, you should use normal 8bit or 16bit to avoid a lot of those issues plus save your bacon on being able to render it in the first place...

                 

                Mylenium

                • 5. Re: Rendering print resolution files -- out of memory, out of luck?What does the comp contain?
                  Navarro Parker Level 3

                  I hear your point. Technically it makes since, but I'd have to disagree. After all, the monitors we use can't display 32bpc color space anyway. Almost all the motion graphics we make ends up in 8bpc color on TV or Web. So we're always viewing some sort of drastically reduced color space.

                   

                  As a test, I had AE render out a 1/10 res TIFF in 32bpc, reduced the file to 8bpc in Photoshop and did a CYMK soft proof and it looked remarkably faithful to what After Effects was displaying. I took the low-res sample file to the printer and they did a test printing and it looked exactly like the on-screen soft proof. So it's just the effects and transfer modes I want AE to process in HDR space.

                   

                  So what I ended up doing was rendering out each layer individually and then used Photoshop to assemble all the layers in 32bpc. While I lost the interactivity of working with live plug-ins in After Effects, I was able to get the look I wanted.

                   

                  Looking forward to the day when After Effects goes 64-bit