5 Replies Latest reply on Sep 21, 2009 9:30 AM by John Danek

    Printing in the right colours?

    apricotandpearjam

      Hi.

       

      I have an logo which is 2 shades of purple and a black outline.

       

      I have had it printed a few times now with great disappointment. Sometimes the purples come out in a greyish faded purple red, other times quite pink.

       

      What do i need to do in order to make sure the right purples are printed in every company?

       

      Please bear in mind that im completely new to this. Im only designing as i can find or afford any decent designers.

       

      Thanks, Benji

        • 1. Re: Printing in the right colours?
          Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          Benji,

           

          First of all you should create the logo in a CMYK document. If you have RGB Document Color Mode it may change quite a lot when printed. Obviously, working in RGB Color Mode may give you false hopes of what is obtainable in normal CMYK printing.

           

          You should also be aware of the issues that may arise because of lacking/different Edit>Color Settings.

           

          And there may be differences depending on quality and kind of printers/printer drivers/printer driver settings. A PDF may show what you might expect, especially if you save as PDF and print from that.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Printing in the right colours?
            John Danek Level 4

            You're only going to get consistency if you use spot colors.  In your case, it sounds like two purples and a Black, so 3 spot colors.  You could ask your local print shop if they can handle the file prep or if they know someone who can.  It will require a competent artist to create the gradients, however yours could be used as a template.

             

            The risk to CMYK is there are too many variables and you are witnessing the results.  Like Jacob says, if you insist on keeping the document CMYK and printing with CMYK inks, you're vulnerable to color shifts.  CMYK is not impossible, but if you're looking for rock-solid consistency, then spot colors are the way to go.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Printing in the right colours?
              apricotandpearjam Level 1

              Hi,

               

              These are all very useful replies.

               

              Im still very confused as its new to me...

               

              I think i get the concept of spot colours but going about doing something about it.... i woudnt have a clue where to start...

               

              Is it a computer program, a shade of ink, a colour code???

               

              In edit> colour settings... there is an RGB drop down menu with loads of different settings and the same for CMYK...

               

              What is RGB vs CMYK all about and why is there no selection for viewing in either?

               

              Again, apologies for being completely new to this but i appreciate your patience and advice.

               

              Thanks

              • 4. Re: Printing in the right colours?
                Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                Benji,

                 

                I think i get the concept of spot colours but going about doing something about it.... i woudnt have a clue where to start...

                 

                Is it a computer program, a shade of ink, a colour code???

                 

                In edit> colour settings... there is an RGB drop down menu with loads of different settings and the same for CMYK...

                 

                What is RGB vs CMYK all about and why is there no selection for viewing in either?

                 

                RGB (Red/Green/Blue) is the kind of colours made of light you see on the screen; that is especially used for web.

                 

                CMYK (Cyan/Magenta/Yellow/Black) is the colours made as blend of the four inks, also called process colours; used for print.

                 

                RGB span a wider range of colours, called Gamut, and especially many bright colours cannot be reproduced with CMYK so you may lose the brightness of the colour by goind from RGB to CMYK.

                 

                Spot colours are special inks that may be used along with or instead of CMYK; they may be much brighter.

                 

                You may specify spot colours in your document. You should not expect to see them represented truly on screen so you have to know them from a swatch book or similar.


                When you choose Document Color Mode, you choose which kind of colours you are using, and those will be represented; if you use the other kind, or if you switch mode, the colours will change, sometimes profoundly.

                 

                The colour settings are tools to get/keep the right/consistent colours all the way from the creation of artwork to the final use in print or on screen or whatever.

                 

                Again, apologies for being completely new to this but i appreciate your patience and advice.

                 

                Thanks

                • 5. Re: Printing in the right colours?
                  John Danek Level 4

                  It's a lot of information to digest all at once, that;s why I suggest you find someone local to help you.  In Illustrator, when you're working in "Print", the document color space is CMYK.  You can load Sport Color swatches in Illustrator = Window > Swatch Libraries > Pantone Solid "Uncoated" ( for stationery to be printed on uncoated paper / otherwise, select 'Coated' for glossy stock, 'Matte' for semi-coated stock [ see your printer ] ).

                   

                  Jacob gave you a good, brief, overview on Color in general.  But, at this stage, you need to find the Spot Color(s) you want to use in your stationery.  Ideally, you do not want to view the actual color on your monitor.  Instead, go to your local print shop and see if they have a Pantone Spot Color swatch book you can look at and select the color that way.  Once you decide on the Purple(s) you want, you can go back to your computer and select the swatches from the Window > Swatch Libraries > Pantone Solid... where you can select the color and it will automatically load into your Color Palette.

                   

                  I can assist. If you are interested, post with contact info.