17 Replies Latest reply on Oct 10, 2009 8:36 AM by Steve Grisetti

    Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?

    Dyer1021

      Hello - I'm completely new to video editing, so it's very possible I'm just doing something wrong, but hoping for some help.  I downloaded the trial version of Premiere Elements 8.0 today on two separate computers and I'm encountering the same problem with both.  I can only seem to open the Organizer, but can't access Premiere Elements from either the "New Project" button on the home screen or through "Edit with Premiere Elements" command under the edit dropdown in organizer.  I first loaded it on my wife's laptop which is a bit underpowered (Pentium 2 2.4GHz or something, 2 MB RAM) and then tried it on mine (Dual Core 2 Duo, 2.6GHz, 4 MB RAM) with the exact same issue.  Does it sound like a problem with the trial version, a resource issue, or just something I'm doing wrong?  I'm happy provide more info, but I don't know enough to know what else would be relevant to add.  Any help would be appreciated!

        • 1. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Make sure that you have the latest updates, including the optional ones, from Windows Update (go there manually and check) and the latest version of Quicktime.

          http://forums.adobe.com/thread/416585?tstart=0

           

          Then uninstall and reinstall the software.

           

          If it still doesn't work, I urge you to contact Adobe Tech Support. They should be aware of your problems.

          http://forums.adobe.com/thread/414984?tstart=0

          • 2. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            After you have followed Steve's tips on updating everything, if you still have no success, you might want to see this ARTICLE on getting a computer ready for an NLE session. The tips in that article usually address the "Running Low on System Resources," and the "Out of Memory" errors, once you are editing. These usually do not crop up at launch.

             

            Next, this ARTICLE might help you find clues as to exactly what is happening, when the program fails to launch, or crashes on launch. Also look for any normal message about the same time as the crash, as it could be some other program loading about the same time, that is getting in the way. A lot of detective work, but those "clues" just my help you sort it out.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
              Dyer1021 Level 1

              Thanks for the great advice - I did as directed, updating everything and reloading PE 8 and now it loads fine.  But WOW is it slow on my machine.  I did some searching on the site and followed the tips for making sure I had the settings right for my camcorder, but it didn't make much of a difference.  By slow I mean that just about any tool I want to launch seems to freeze up the system for minutes at a time before loads.  Is it a resource issue, or is working with AVCHD files just always cumbersome?  Would more RAM help?

              • 4. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                With AVCHD, your CPU will be your weak link. It is highly CPU intensive to work with, with I/O (HDD's) being second and RAM third in order of importance. More RAM will always help, but you might not really notice the improvements. It will lower the use of the Page File (I/O) a little, which can speed things up a little. In your case, the CPU is probably really busy with the AVCHD, so the normal processes, like running PrE itself, takes a back seat.

                 

                What is you CPU type and speed?

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                  Kodebuster Level 3

                  As stated, AVCHD is a resource hog and is very CPU bound.

                   

                  In my opinion adding RAM to either the laptop, or the Desktop Core 2, will buy you little relief, and just cost you money where it might be better served.

                   

                  Most would recommend at least a Quad Core CPU with a minimum of 4 gig of RAM when dealing AVCHD (and some would even consider this borderline).

                   

                  What you might try is to convert AVCHD to standard HDV, and see if this at least gets you to an acceptable operation under your existing hardware.

                   

                  See this link for AVCHD converion options:

                   

                  http://forums.adobe.com/thread/390605?tstart=0

                   

                  Again, in my opinion, the PC's you indicate are very underpowered for AVCHD editing, and it may get acceptable with the HDV format...

                  • 6. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                    the_wine_snob Level 9
                    Most would recommend at least a Quad Core CPU with a minimum of 4 gig of RAM when dealing AVCHD (and some would even consider this borderline).

                     

                    Yes. Some report adequate speed and ease with a single quad-core CPU, many look at a dual-quad as the bare minimum.

                     

                    Though I am not anticipating using AVCHD in my workflow (though one never knows), I'm looking at dual-i7's for my new workstation.

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                      Kodebuster Level 3

                      I'm running a single i7Core-940 @ 3.0 ghz with Vista-64, and seeing eight (8) threads of CPU power pounding away on a render is a thing of beauty.

                       

                      It's like watching the Road Runner on steroids.

                       

                      I can't imagine what a dual i7Core would look like...

                      • 8. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                        Dyer1021 Level 1

                        Thanks, I guessed that might be the case.  Sounds like an upgrade is in order. Are Macs any faster for an equivalent processor, or will I get more bang for my buck sticking with a PC platform?

                        • 9. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                          Boy, is that an impossible question to answer! It all depends on what you're doing and how you're measuring it -- and whether you include the cost of antivirus software, etc., in your calculations.

                           

                          But a well-powered iMac running Final Cut Express should run quite well for you for about a $1700 investment.

                           

                          Whether or not that's a better value than a new comparably powered PC running Windows 7 and Premiere Elements for under $1000 is a little like comparing Apples to oranges.

                          • 10. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                            Dyer1021 Level 1

                            Makes sense . . . I'm confused, though.  My system now is a 2.6 GHz dual core ("duo 2") processor with 4MB RAM.  What should I be looking for to increase the speed of AVCHD editing dramatically?  Would a single quad core chip running at more or less the same speed do it, or do I really need a dual processor worstation?  We already have two laptops in the house, so this new system will almost exclusively be used for video editing and I don't want to overkill it, but I don't want to have the same issues I'm having now (with every editor software I've tried, incidently).  Sorry for all the naive questions!

                            • 11. Re: Premiere Elements 8.0 Crashing When it Loads?
                              the_wine_snob Level 9

                              On the PC-side, an i7 should be a good choice. Kodebuster is running one and is very happy.

                               

                              Good luck,

                               

                              Hunt

                              • 12. One Last Question . . .
                                Dyer1021 Level 1

                                Thank you, this is all so helpful.  So, after looking at dual processor workstations all morning, I'm now looking at a Dell "Studio XPS 9000" (sounds like a joke from a movie) with a 2.66GHz i7, 6 GB RAM, and a 1.5TB hard drive for about half of what the workstation was going to cost.  Do you see any red flags for concern there before I pull the trigger?

                                 

                                And THANK YOU all for all the help!

                                • 13. Re: One Last Question . . .
                                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                                  Not a "red flag," but I'd structure the I/O sub-system, i.e. the HDD's, to maximize their use in an NLE.

                                   

                                  Instead of a single 1.5TB HDD, I'd look at something like this:

                                   

                                  C:\ ~ 500GB with the fastest drive (and controller, like SATA II), and use it for only the OS, programs, and maybe the Page File.

                                  D:\ that 1.5TB, also hoping for SATA II - media

                                  E:\ another 1.5TB,also hoping for SATA II - Projects and Scratch Disks

                                   

                                  That would give you 3 physical HDD's and allow you to allocate them for NLE work.

                                   

                                  Good luck,

                                   

                                  Hunt

                                  • 14. Re: One Last Question . . .
                                    Dyer1021 Level 1

                                    Make sense.  I wound up going with an HP instead of the Dell because of some deals they were offering, and had it configured with 9GB RAM and two 1T SATA II drives (it doesn't have a third slot).  If I partition the first drive and put the OS in it's own partition, would I achieve the same benefit as having the OS on its own independent drive?

                                    • 15. Re: One Last Question . . .
                                      the_wine_snob Level 9
                                      If I partition the first drive and put the OS in it's own partition, would I achieve the same benefit as having the OS on its own independent drive?

                                       

                                      Please do not even think of a partition. That will actually slow things down. What happens is the OS sees the two partitions as separate physical HDD's. It will request reads/writes from both, but the partitions are only one physical HDD, and cannot comply. This becomes a big bottleneck.

                                       

                                      The only reason that I can think of for partitions would be for multi-boot systems. In those cases, nothing but the OS would be on any one partition, so the others would be idle. There used to be a reason for doing this, back in about PS 7, but as of PS CS, the program can see discs of infinite size.

                                       

                                      With two physical HDD's, you might want to think about getting a fast, FW-800, or eSATA, external, and using that for your Projects and your Scratch Disks. Note that you will likely have to add a card (PCI, PCIe or ExpressCard) to allow for this connection. If that is the case, go with eSATA, as it will be as fast as you'll get.

                                       

                                      As I shuttle my Projects between my laptop (3x 200GB SATA II's) and my workstation (6x 1TB SATA II's + 2x 1.5TB ATA-100's), I use a bank of Maxtor 2TB FW-800's. In these cases, I have everything on the external. This is not the ideal, as having the media files on an internal would be better, but I can shuttle the Projects and have everything work fine, regardless of which machine I am editing on. FW-800 was the slowest connection that I could stand to edit to/from.

                                       

                                      Please do not even think about a partition.

                                       

                                      Good luck,

                                       

                                      Hunt

                                      • 16. Re: One Last Question . . .
                                        Dyer1021 Level 1

                                        Thanks for the help.  I got the new computer today and it's wonderful, but I want to make sure I set everything up correctly.  Ironically they shipped with without installing PE as ordered, so I can't do the very thing I bought it for yet, but at least it gives me time to make sure I set it up correctly.  Should I just use both drives independently, or is there an advantage to a RAID configuration?  If I keep the drives completely independent, should I leave the OS and installed programs (and any files I create with them on the primary drive and then jusst use the second for AVCHD storage?  I pretty well stretched the budget on this so an external eSATA drive isn't in the cards for me just yet.  Sorry for all the naive questions - I've tried to do some reading on this but I'm as in the dark on the subject as I was when I started.

                                        • 17. Re: One Last Question . . .
                                          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                                          Best set-up for video editing is to keep your keep your drives separate. Use your C drive for your programs and other miscellaneous stuff.

                                           

                                          Use your second drive for your video project files, video clips, photos and other assets. (The program will automatically direct your scratch files and render files to this drive -- which is a good thing.) We also recommend that, whenever you start a new project, you create a new sub-folder for it. This not only keeps everything nice and neat but, when it's time to delete your project, you can remove the project files, render files, scratch files and asset files simply by deleting the one folder.