3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 22, 2009 2:53 PM by Printer_Rick

    Help in regards to speeding up when editing paths and using pathfinder tools.

    5arah1

      I have a feeling I am missing something when it comes to creating images in Illustrator by drawing paths with either the pen or brush tool, laying them on top of each other and then dividing them.  As I know it's best that the edges of two objects meet in order to keep the file clean.  I make use of the layers pallet by selecting objects there and deleting stray points and objects that are not needed after using the divide tool.

       

      Is there another way to do this?  Because it is soooo time consuming I am just wondering if there is a better way to keep the file clean.  I am trying to build a small portfolio in order to start selling images so it is very important for the files to be well built. Everything I have read on the pathfinder tool and divide has been so simple.  Is there another tool that I should be using?  Is there a faster way to edit?

        • 1. Re: Help in regards to speeding up when editing paths and using pathfinder tools.
          Skullmaker Level 3

          Hello 5arah1,

           

          Here is a video tutorial that can be helpful in your quest.

           

          http://www.layersmagazine.com/illustrator-pathfinder-palette.html

           

          I hope this helps!

          • 2. Re: Help in regards to speeding up when editing paths and using pathfinder tools.
            Printer_Rick Level 4

            5arah1 wrote:

             

            I have a feeling I am missing something when it comes to creating images in Illustrator by drawing paths with either the pen or brush tool, laying them on top of each other and then dividing them.  As I know it's best that the edges of two objects meet in order to keep the file clean.  I make use of the layers pallet by selecting objects there and deleting stray points and objects that are not needed after using the divide tool.

             

            Is there another way to do this?  Because it is soooo time consuming I am just wondering if there is a better way to keep the file clean.  I am trying to build a small portfolio in order to start selling images so it is very important for the files to be well built. Everything I have read on the pathfinder tool and divide has been so simple.  Is there another tool that I should be using?  Is there a faster way to edit?

            I am a little confused out dividing making the file clean. As I understand divide splits overlapping areas so that artwork is no longer stacked.

             

            In a sense this is destructive. If you have two circles overlapping, with pathfinder: divide, you end up with 2 circles with bites taken out, and a football:

             

            2 circles divided.jpg

            It's true that there is no more hidden artwork, but you also have three objects instead of two. So one could argue that having two circles makes for a cleaner file (but I guess it's a matter of opinion)

             

            The truth is most artwork is comprised of stacked objects. Many compound shapes allow underlying shapes to show through. If you were to divide the compounds you lose the information of the compound shape.

             

            When artwork is stacked, some artwork below may be hidden. But this dimensional aspect allows you to move or reshape the objects on top later on, and what was hidden before may become visible. If it was all divided you would have to do a lot of adjusting.

             

            Another approach to clean files is to make use of the appearance panel and pathfinder effects. Consider if you wanted a large red circle with a green donut on top. One catch - the center of the donut has to be white.

             

            Most people would probably just draw 3 circles, one red, green next, and small white on top. But that's not a green donut, that's just 3 stacked circles.

             

            Others might create a green compound donut, punch a hole through the red circle, allowing the white artboard to show through. But then, it's no longer a red circle. And you have two compounds.

             

            Then somebody else will draw the green donut, and slap a white circle between the red circle and the green donut big enough to fill the hole. But now you've added another object.

             

            There is a way to get the white hole, with no white objects, and the red circle intact. Refer to the attached file (CS4). By utilizing effects, you can make your art simpler and more elegant.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Help in regards to speeding up when editing paths and using pathfinder tools.
              Printer_Rick Level 4

              5arah1 wrote:

               

              I have a feeling I am missing something when it comes to creating images in Illustrator by drawing paths with either the pen or brush tool, laying them on top of each other and then dividing them.  As I know it's best that the edges of two objects meet in order to keep the file clean.  I make use of the layers pallet by selecting objects there and deleting stray points and objects that are not needed after using the divide tool.

               

              Is there another way to do this?  Because it is soooo time consuming I am just wondering if there is a better way to keep the file clean.  I am trying to build a small portfolio in order to start selling images so it is very important for the files to be well built. Everything I have read on the pathfinder tool and divide has been so simple.  Is there another tool that I should be using?  Is there a faster way to edit?

              I am a little confused out dividing to make the file clean. As I understand divide splits overlapping areas so that artwork is no longer stacked.

               

              In a sense this is destructive. If you have two circles overlapping, with pathfinder: divide, you end up with 2 circles with bites taken out, and a football:

               

              2 circles divided.jpg

              It's true that there is no more hidden artwork, but you also have three objects instead of two. So one could argue that having two circles makes for a cleaner file (but I guess it's a matter of opinion)

               

              The truth is most artwork is comprised of stacked objects. Many compound shapes allow underlying shapes to show through. If you were to divide the compounds you lose the information of the compound shape.

               

              When artwork is stacked, some artwork below may be hidden. But this dimensional aspect allows you to move or reshape the objects on top later on, and what was hidden before may become visible. If it was all divided you would have to do a lot of adjusting.

               

              Another approach to clean files is to make use of the appearance panel and pathfinder effects. Consider if you wanted a large red circle with a green donut on top. One catch - the center of the donut has to be white.

               

              Most people would probably just draw 3 circles, one red, green next, and small white on top. But that's not a green donut, that's just 3 stacked circles.

               

              Others might create a green compound donut, punch a hole through the red circle, allowing the white artboard to show through. But then, it's no longer a red circle. And you have two compounds.

               

              Then somebody else will draw the green donut, and slap a white circle between the red circle and the green donut big enough to fill the hole. But now you've added another object.

               

              There is a way to get the white hole, with no white objects, and the red circle intact. Refer to the attached file (CS4). By utilizing effects, you can make your art simpler and more elegant.

               

              (Sorry for the duplicate post it was unintentional)

               

              Message was edited by: Printer_Rick