5 Replies Latest reply on Oct 23, 2009 8:37 AM by the_wine_snob

    Basic DV camcorder capture questions for big project

    jorgeeli Level 1

      Hi,

       

      I have 45 Mini-DV tapes shot with a Canon ZR25MC that I want to eventually transfer to DVD's. I would like to first import them to my PC hard drive, then maybe remove/delete unwanted scenes and finally transfer them to DVD for permanent archiving and viewing. I'm not interested in doing any fancy editing.

       

      My plan is to download each tape to an individual directory with each scene as an individual file. I will then permanently delete unwanted scenes files and maybe stitch similar scenes together into a single file. Finally I will burn the scenes to DVD with chapters for each scene. I will keep the PC files as backup.

       

      Questions:

      1) Can I use PPE8 to easily and automatically break the tape into individual scenes and automatically save the files?

       

      2) What settings should I in the capture window (timecode/content, etc)?

       

      3) What is the proper workflow for the capture process to end up with saved, individual scene files from each tape?

       

      4) What video format should I select to store the scenes files in my PC?

       

      Thanks for your help. Aside from the answer to my questions, any suggestions and tips will be greatly appreciated.

        • 1. Re: Basic DV camcorder capture questions for big project
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Premiere Elements will automatically break your captured video into clips, based on timecode (a break whenever you paused your camcorder while shooting) or scene contect. I recommend breaking by timecode, assuming you're not capturing one, long, continuous shot.

           

          Whenever you capture, you have the option of browsing to a location where you'd like your captured video stored. You can, then, create a new folder for each set of captures.

           

          Whenever you capture from a miniDV camcorder over FireWire, your video will be captured as DV-AVIs, the ideal format for editing video. (It's also ideal because it means the video data comes directly from the camcorder's tape unchanged and in its original quality.)

           

          I assume I don't have to warn you that DV-AVIs are rather large. About 13 gigabytes per hour. So, if you plan to capture 45 hours of video tape, you'd better have at least a 750 gigabyte hard drive to store them to. (This can be an external or second hard drive. In fact, you'll get the best video editing performance if you do.)

           

          Finally, this is a big project. Start with baby steps. Do a short video project and make sure your workflow works before you put hundreds of hours into doing your whole library!

          • 2. Re: Basic DV camcorder capture questions for big project
            the_wine_snob Level 9
            1) Can I use PPE8 to easily and automatically break the tape into individual scenes and automatically save the files?

             

            I'm not sure about the Scene Detect capabilities of PrE 8. Many use a shareware program, SceneAlyzer Live for Capture, outside of PrE and PrPro because of its very good Scene Detect capabilities.

             

            2) What settings should I in the capture window (timecode/content, etc)?

             

            By "Timecode," do you mean the Date/Time Stamp? For pure DV Capture from a miniDV tape, a DV NTSC (or PAL) Project with Capture would be ideal. SceneAlyzer Live can also do the same for you. The Date/Time Stamp is a different matter. DVDate can add this in most situations.

             

            3) What is the proper workflow for the capture process to end up with saved, individual scene files from each tape?

             

            My workflow, per your criteria, would be to do a separate Project for each tape and do the Capture, then the rough editing. If you wish to archive the resulting footage for later editing, DV-AVI Type II (the native format of PrE) would be the ideal format/CODEC. For archiving to DVD-Data, however, the files will be very large @ 13GB/hour. I would strongly suggest an external HDD for this archiving, as 1 hour of DV-AVI will need to span 2 DVD-9 (DL) discs, and 4 DVD-5 discs. Software to all of this spanning will be more in the realm of backup software, like Norton Ghost.

             

            4) What video format should I select to store the scenes files in my PC?

             

            Again, the external HDD would be great for this.

             

            Now, you mention going to a DVD-Video. You can do one for each Project w/ Menus and Chapter Markers, etc., or you can then bring in the Exported DV-AVI from each of your "mini" Projects and do a DVD-Video for the combined footage. This will depend on what you want to end up with.

             

            Note: if you archive your footage to DVD-Video, you will have MPEG-2 Video files. These are compressed, and are not really meant for additional editing.

             

            Good luck, and I see that Steve beat me to the punch on many things, as the forum server crashed on me, in mid-post.

             

            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Basic DV camcorder capture questions for big project
              rawatts Level 1

              1) Can I use PPE8 to easily and automatically break the tape into individual scenes and automatically save the files?

              PE8 can capture with scene detect.  When you capture make sure full motion is checked.  Choose your save to location - this is where you can make a folder for each tape if you want.  Then you can choose what type of scene detect you want - time code or content.  I prefer timecode so that every time the timecode is broken by stopping the recording process a new clip is captured.  I have not used auto analyzer - others can answer.

               

              2) What settings should I in the capture window (timecode/content, etc)?  See above

               

              3) What is the proper workflow for the capture process to end up with saved, individual scene files from each tape?  If you follow the directions above you should have a folder for each tape and clips numbered after the name you choose then added to the name 01,02, etc.

               

              4) What video format should I select to store the scenes files in my PC? I would use .avi - they are larger but easier to edit and not compressed.  I would recomend an external drive like http://www.buy.com/retail/product.asp?sku=212502309&i=0&adid=17070 and use eSATA connection.  Others may comment, but keep the tapes and if you decide to do DVD's (I have read that many consider "burned" DVDs temporary - less than 10 year shelf life - maybe somone can update us on this) consider keeping in different places.

               

              Bob

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Basic DV camcorder capture questions for big project
                jorgeeli Level 1

                Thank you all for your very thorough replies.

                 

                I will pilot my workflow to identify glithces.

                 

                Indeed, PPE8 is very unreliable in detecting scenes from my Canon miniDV camcorder, so I went ahead and got a copy of sceneAnalyzer... it worked like a charm.

                 

                Thanks again to all... you guys rock!!

                • 5. Re: Basic DV camcorder capture questions for big project
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  I'm glad that SceneAlyzer Live worked for you. Many feel that it is the Capture utility that should have been in Adobe NLE's. The same feeling exists for the HD Capture from HDVSplit - this should have been in Adone NLE's.

                   

                  Maybe PrPro CS5 will have HDVSplit built in? Then, it can be added to PrE 9.

                   

                  Good luck, and thank you for reporting,

                   

                  Hunt