14 Replies Latest reply on Nov 4, 2009 3:40 PM by ru73

    Best Practice to Recreate Image?

    lsb4uebay Level 1

      Hi,

       

        I have the following image that I want to vectorized (I think this is the right term) into AI.

       

        All I really want to do is duplicate the image or remove the the (white) background out of this picture & for the most part, will keep the object itself as is.  May consider changing its color later, but for now, that's not the intent.

       

           What is the best & easiest practice to take this picture image & duplicate it into AI?

       

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
          Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          Isb,

           

          It should not be too difficult to trace it with the Pen Tool, creating separate parts (horizontally, see below). The jagged lines may make Live Tracing even less recommendable. The image is simple so you should be able to draw the simple lines quite accurately. You may just draw the upper part and Object>Transform>Reflect. And copy the four ones.

           

          It seems to be a simple gradient used, but you can improve it by using a blend in each part, formed by the full part having the colour at the rim and a thin white rectangle in the middle, both fill no stroke, so you will need a stroke no fill path to get the bordering/dividing lines of each part (you can avoid that if you just recreate the gradients).

          • 2. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
            Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

            No doubt about it the best would be to trace it.

            • 3. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
              lsb4uebay Level 1

              Hi Wade & Jacob,

               

                   Seriously?  Tracing is my best option?  Even though this part may not be highly complex to trace, it still takes a bit of time to trace it.  Perhaps, because I'm a novice to, I don't seem to get an exact overlay, which for this part is not a big deal.  However, I have more complex parts that will be more difficult to trace & take signficantly more time.

               

               

                As mentioned previously, I basically have the desired image now, including the current color scheme, but because this is a '.jpg', '.tif', or whatever file format it came from, show the background that I'm hoping AI can remove.

               

                   Doesn't Live Trace work without signficantly distorting line weights or colors or breaking the image up into multiple segements that ends up being more work then it's worth?  Or is there another AI feature that I'm not aware of that work well?

               

              Thanks

              • 4. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                Isolder

                If you have the software in front of you it should be quite easy to figure out how live trace will handle your image. No matter what method you use it will require multiple segments.

                 

                Manually tracing stuff is nothing new here. That's the AI feature that works well for what you are wanting.

                • 5. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                  Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

                  lsb4uebay wrote:

                   

                  Hi Wade & Jacob,

                   

                       Seriously?  Tracing is my best option?  Even though this part may not be highly complex to trace, it still takes a bit of time to trace it.  Perhaps, because I'm a novice to, I don't seem to get an exact overlay, which for this part is not a big deal.  However, I have more complex parts that will be more difficult to trace & take signficantly more time.

                   

                   

                    As mentioned previously, I basically have the desired image now, including the current color scheme, but because this is a '.jpg', '.tif', or whatever file format it came from, show the background that I'm hoping AI can remove.

                   

                       Doesn't Live Trace work without signficantly distorting line weights or colors or breaking the image up into multiple segements that ends up being more work then it's worth?  Or is there another AI feature that I'm not aware of that work well?

                   

                  Thanks

                  Well you see Jacob and the other contributors here as well as myself invested many years to develop our skills and the reason we did so is so that we can do things like trace the art work or like the original artist did, create it from scratch.

                   

                  The idea that since you are a novice you should not have to invest this time might be more foreign to us than the idea that you will have to learn to do what we can do even though we are experience.

                   

                  You do realize that there was an artist who actually created this art and there was nothing to automatically generate this final product and if there are many of these items that have to be recreated and you do not have the skills to recreate them that probably means you have to hire someone that does have the skills and who has invested the time to be able to do so.

                   

                  To tel you the truth it is kind of insulting that someone would think they should not have to spend such time as they do not have the time to invest like us poor fools.

                   

                  But if you can get live trace to do what you want more power to you.

                   

                  BTW if you decide to try and learn and spend some tie creating this art you might actually find it fun even though hard work.

                   

                  Good luck.

                  • 6. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                    Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                    Isb,

                     

                    Many of the parts are quite simple shapes such as rectangles, trapeziums, and combinations of the two kinds. For each, you may create a rectangle with the approximate width and height, using the Rectangle Tool, place it on top of the part, and adjust, inserts additional Anchor Points ewith the Add Anchor Point Tool (flyout from the Pen Tool), remove points with the Remove Anchor Point Tool (flyout from guess what), etc.

                     

                    Apart from the rounded parts, to the left and a few other places, you can use simple shapes as above or just click to place the Anchor Points. The rounded parts require ClickDragging the right way, or the combination of straight and curved objects such as rectangles and circles/ellipses, which may be combined in different ways using the Pathfinder palette followed by additional work.

                     

                    But you may just Live Trace it and see what you, and the receiver, think of it.

                     

                    We all based our answers on the first word(s) of the Heading. In almost all cases, best is also easiest; you can drown in cleanup.

                    • 7. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                      PrepressPro1 Adobe Community Professional

                      Yes, seriously. You have a chance to learn a new skill to add to your skill set. I hope you are being compensated for your time on this project, but the time you spend commiserating the task at hand might better be spent learning. You asked for the BEST way to effect the results. I have to agree with all the posts in response to yours. You could try to explore every short cut and work around to finish your project, but that is not what you appear to be asking for in your OP.

                      AAWWK, Seriously.

                      • 8. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                        lsb4uebay Level 1

                        Hi Illustrators,

                         

                             It appears that I have offended some of you.  If so, I apologize for that.  Learning AI & its features is not exactly user friendly.  Perhaps, I'm comparing it to high-end CAD applications, which is my primary expertise & learning those were easier (to me).

                         

                          But, with any software application, it takes some time to become profeciient & which is the primary reason that I come to forums like this - To learn from the experts or at least people who have used AI longer then I have.

                         

                          Also, as with most of our jobs, there's time crunches & spending time to learn a software application & its features is not always a luxury that a new user can have.  So, if there are any tips & tricks to make the job faster, quality images & desirable results, I would greatly appreciate them.

                         

                        Thanks

                        • 9. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                          Isolder Level 2

                          AAWWK?

                           

                          Ask And Walk With Knowledge?

                           

                          Acronymfinder.com fails me with this one.

                          • 10. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                            Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                            Isb,

                             

                            No offence taken here. The suggestions in posts #1&4 are attempts to pave the way through the rough landscape. You may try the Live Trace, but you may easily use more time cleaning up than recreating the artwork, only to end with a poorer result.

                            • 11. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                              PrepressPro1 Adobe Community Professional

                              This is the AAWWK-word. Us birds use the AAWWK-word mostly when something bad happens to us. I use it when one of my 8 toes gets caught in the keyboard when typing. You try typing with 8 toes and a beak and see if you don't end up using the AAWWK-word too.

                              • 12. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                                Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                                But it is easier to hit (and see) a key with a beak than with a snout, or nose for those that have one, when you need a complicated keyboard combination along with using the mouse/stylus; some claws/paws, or hands for those that have those, are too small or clumsy to both hit and reach all the keys.

                                • 13. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                                  JETalmage Level 6
                                  the primary reason that I come to forums like this - To learn from the experts

                                   

                                  Then take the advice you've been given. You are suffering under a very common misconception about the purpose and limitations of auto-tracing.

                                  Much has been written in this forum about that misconception. (I know, because I wrote much of it.) Do a search for autotracing or LiveTrace.

                                   

                                  There is no "magic bullet"--no instant-gratification, one-click command for automatically tracing a raster image into quality vector paths. Autotracing should be reserved only for situations in which proper path drawing is completely impractical. Your sample image is a very simple drawing. It can be drawn correctly in a few minutes. (But there's also no avoidance of learning how to use the drawing tools.)

                                   

                                  JET

                                  • 14. Re: Best Practice to Recreate Image?
                                    ru73 Level 1

                                    It looks like your file was created in CAD. I would try to get a DXF file from the original CAD, and import into AI. Then, update the gradient if need be.

                                     

                                    Ralph

                                     

                                    http://www.dyeline.com