2 Replies Latest reply on Nov 8, 2009 10:22 AM by the_wine_snob

    Interesting comparison - Premiere Elements / iMovie

    JayZ_WA Level 1

      I am trying to diagnose the issues I am running into with Premiere Elements - I can't work for 4 minutes before it crashes, makes it difficult to accomplish anything!

       

       

      As I look at several options, including another system upgrade, I am thinking it might be an option to stay with PrE (8.0) on Windows OR get a Mac for video edition/photo editing.

       

      If anyone has experience in this area, how does PrE compare to iMovie?  On a scale of 1-10, 1 being iMovie - 10 being Final Cut Pro (or, perhaps Premiere Pro ... don't know how they compare).  Where does PrE fall - more capabilities options than iMovie, less than Final Cut/Pr Pro ... maybe a 4, 5, 6?

       

      Interesting question or odd question!  Just want to have a good option for doing some amateur video editing (video from Canon 7D & Canon HF S100, still photos and various audio).

       

      Thanks for your thoughts, feedback, recommendations!  Although this is a Windows centered blog with Premiere Elements for Windows, I knew it would be a knowledgable group!

        • 1. Re: Interesting comparison - Premiere Elements / iMovie
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          It's impossible to compare the two, Jayz. They're very different programs with very different capabilities.

           

          iMovie is a no-brainer program. You can throw almost anything at it and it will make it look good. But, for someone like me who likes to have a lot of control, it drives me nuts! Think of it as Windows MovieMaker with lots of bells and whistles! And, of course, it's on a Mac, which means Apple controls both hardware and operating system, so you've got few instability problems.

           

          Final Cut Express is a better comparison to Premiere Elements, and it's a terrific program. But, whoa! Has it got a learning curve!

           

          Premiere Elements is, on the other hand, a professional style editing app. A slightly stripped down version of Premiere Pro, it runs very deep, with 99 video and 99 audio tracks, keyframing capabilities for creating custom effects and motion paths and lots of features for managing and manipulating your video and audio. I wouldn't go at it without an instruction book (which is why I wrote an instruction book, on sale on Amazon and http://Muvipix.com).

           

          It also falls victim to Windows chief liability -- that Microsoft has to design and maintain an operating system that runs on every possible configuration of hardware. And, well, you know how that can go. Although Windows 7 seems to have addressed most of those issues.

           

          You're looking at an AVCHD camcorder, probably the most difficult video format to edit. So, whatever you go for, don't scrimp on the hardware! If you go PC, get a good, consistent brand -- like Dell or HP and not a laptop -- with a quad core processor and 4 gigs of RAM. And, for least challenges, stick with the 32-bit version of Windows 7.

          • 2. Re: Interesting comparison - Premiere Elements / iMovie
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Steve,

             

            You have hit one big "nail" squarely on the head:

             

            It also falls victim to Windows chief liability -- that Microsoft has to design and maintain an operating system that runs on every possible configuration of hardware. And, well, you know how that can go. Although Windows 7 seems to have addressed most of those issues.

             

            Because of the myriad possibilities for configuration, both hardware and software, a user has to be more pro-active with their system.

             

            Over the years, working on many thousands of problems with Adobe NLE's, I still see these issues break down in this order:

             

            System

            Assets

            Project settings

             

            System issues far outweigh the other two, and should be addressed by most users first. Assets come in second, and if Project settings match Assets, it falls way at the bottom. Now, there are also cases of OE (Operator Error) and real Bugs. Though some versions of the Adobe NLE's do have some real Bugs, we're probably talking less than 1% of all issues. While I have not done a spreadsheet, my "seat-o-the-pants" experience substantiates the above list as where one should start and the order they should work on things for troubleshooting.

             

            Mac's do have one big advantage - far more commonality in hardware and software. Of course, it now seems that the new Snow Leopard OS does not play nice with many things Adobe, so even the vaunted Mac's are not fail-safe. To me, considering the almost complete control that Apple has over all things Mac, there should NEVER be any incompatibility issues, given that Adobe offers so many programs for both platforms. How Apple can issue an OS upgrade that ignores so many Adobe programs is beyond my comprehension.

             

            Just some thoughts,

             

            Hunt