8 Replies Latest reply on Nov 11, 2009 6:51 AM by the_wine_snob

    Premiere 7 importing problems

    mjauniversum

      I'm a newbie, and having some troubles.

       

      I want to import VOB-files from a DVD and then save them as mpeg2. When I do this I always get reduced quality in the new files. I have tried a lot of different settings, I have changed both project settings and saving-settings. What settings should I have? Is there an easy tutorial for this? The only thing I want is to have the saved files in the same quality as they were in the DVD. It seems like the quality drop is when I import the files from the DVD, because when I play them in Premiere I can see the difference.

       

      Thanks for help.

      /Tobias

        • 1. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          VOB files ARE MPEG2s, Tobias. You can use them as is just by changing their suffix to .mpg.

           

          Further, Premiere Elements doesn't make a good converter for going from VOBs to MPEGs because it turns the files into AVIs before exporting them -- which means you go through a completely unnecessary level of conversion.

           

          Will changing the suffix meet your need? I'm not sure what you want to use your MPEGs for, so there may be some additional considerations.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Tobias,

             

            This ARTICLE will give you some background on .VOB files. They can be a lot more than just the MPEG-2 files, so often contained within. This is especially true of the first .VOB from a DVD-Video, and can also differ in mini-DVD cameras, depending on the make/model.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
              mjauniversum Level 1

              Hi, thanks for your answer!

              I didn't know that the files were converted to AVI when importing them to Premiere elements, that's interesting. Does this mean that there's always some drop of quality when you import movies from a DVD? Is it possible to change the settings so that you import movies into mpeg2 format instead?

               

              Unfortunatly it's not a solution to change the suffix, because what I want to do is this:

              I want to import a few short movies from a DVD and cut them down, and add some black screens and text between the clips, and some text onto the clips. I know how to do this, but I can't get the quality good enough. I am going to show the movies on a big screen and the quality drop is very obvious compared to the original DVD movies. The original movies on the DVD are unfortunatly not very good, and that means that I can't afford any drop in quality. (when I say "drop in quality" I mean "reduced quality")

               

              Is it possible for me to produce my movie without any visible quality drop?

               

              Thanks

              /Tobias

              • 4. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
                the_wine_snob Level 9
                Does this mean that there's always some drop of quality when you import movies from a DVD?

                Actually, the drop in quality happens when the original material is compressed to MPEG-2 to burn to a DVD-Video. The internal (or external) conversion to DV-AVI does not lose any noticable quality. However, one does lose quality again, when an subsequent compression to MPEG-2 occurs, if one Exports/Burns another DVD-Video.

                 

                Is it possible to change the settings so that you import movies into mpeg2 format instead?

                 

                No, not with an NLE, like PrE, or PrPro. There are some NLE's, however, that will do what is called "smart Rendering," where any unchanged MPEG-2 material is NOT Transcoded again to MPEG-2. Note: any footage that HAS been changed will have to be re-Transcoded.

                 

                The reason for the above is because of the structure of the two files, MPEG-2 vs DV-AVI. DV-AVI has all of the Frames completely formed, while MPEG-2 has what is called GOP (Group of Pictures), where there is one full Frame (I-frame) about every 15-18 and then only "difference Frames." This will give you a visual example of the differences:

                GOP_Example_01.jpg

                 

                To edit at a Frame level, PrE (and PrPro) need to create all those Frames, and this must be done by taking the I-Frame and then constructing a full Frame from the following 14-17 "difference Frames." That is one reason that the file size will swell between the MPEG-2 and the DV-AVI - the latter has all I-frames.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Tobias,

                   

                  Is it possible for me to produce my movie without any visible quality drop?

                   

                  The first method would be to go back to the original footage used to create this source DVD-Video. This will yield about the same results as what you currently have on the DVD-Video, that you are Importing from.

                   

                  The second would be to use another NLE (Non Linear Editor) to do the editing. There are several that do "smart Rendering," but I do not know which ones. Seems that Sony Vegas (not sure if needs to be the "Pro" version, or not) does this. You might wish to check, or wait for someone who knows to chime-in. Also, look at CyberLink's PowerDirector and Magix MovieEdit Pro. They might also offer this feature. I just do not know.

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    Tobias,

                     

                    It seems that Sony's Vegas DOES offer "smart Rendering," according to this ARTICLE. Now, it's a year, or so, old, so you might want to check out the capabilities of the current version. Also, note that this is for "cuts only" editing. When you add your Titles, especially where they appear OVER the footage, you might not get the quality that you seek.

                     

                    This is the ugly downside to trying to edit heavily compressed material, like MPEG-2, that is a delivery format/CODEC and not really meant to be edited.

                     

                    Now, one option might be to edit in PrE, but to Export to DV-AVI file and burn a DVD-Data disc. This would have to be played from a computer, and not a DVD-Video player, but you could hook the feed from the computer up to your TV, or Video projector via direct cables. The limitation would be the Duration of your movie, as DV-AVI is ~ 13GB/hour, and that exceeds the capacity of a DVD-9 (Double Layer). One way around this would be Export your DV-AVI directly to the computer's HDD, or to an external HDD, and just hook the TV, or projector, to the computer. This does cut down on the transportability of the Project though, as either the original computer, or the original external HDD will HAVE to be used. Still, this might get you by. You only have to address the logistics of moving and attaching the computer, or external HDD.

                     

                    Just thinking here, good luck

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
                      mjauniversum Level 1

                      Thank you a lot for your answer and helpful information. I really understand the "problem" now. And I have learned many new things about video editing and video formats.

                       

                      I'm not sure what solution I will try, but maybe I will make an DV-AVI and play it from the computer, or maybe I will just make a video with poor quality and try to live with it.

                      Unfortunatly I don't have access to the orignial footage, nor another video editing software.

                       

                      Thanks again!

                      • 8. Re: Premiere 7 importing problems
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        You are most welcome!

                         

                         

                        With Video editing, there are often compromises to be made. Knowing what these are can help one decide which direction to go with a Project.

                         

                        Digital editing is great, but depending on one's source footage, there can still be limitations.

                         

                        Good luck, and I hope that you can get a good product in the end.

                         

                        Hunt