11 Replies Latest reply on Nov 21, 2009 5:59 AM by the_wine_snob

    Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit

    Itay B. Level 1

      Premiere Elements 8.

       

      A) Tasks:

      1. Clear everything between 01:00 and 02:00 on all channels.

      2. Delete everything between 01:00 and 02:00 on all channels (i.e. clear + close gaps).

       

      B) Task:

      Given a PE8 project, create a new project and import the former as a single clip.

       

      How would one go about carrying out the above tasks?

        • 1. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          OK, here we're talking about Tracks (the term Channels applies to the constituant elements that make up an image, plus Alpha Channels, in Photoshop).

           

          To accomplish a Delete and Close Gap, place your CTI (Current Time Indicator, with the Edit Line) where you wish the Deletion to start and hit Crtl+K, which will Cut all Clips on all Tracks at that point. Move the CTI to where you wish for the Deletion to end, and repeat the Ctrl+K. Now, you have made to Cuts - one at the beginning, and one at the end. Place the cursor above the upper-most Clip (the new one that we created) and drag down with just a bit of horizontal movement (easier to do when zoom in a bit horizontally, but this also depends on the Duration of our newly created Clips) to "lasso" all of these. They will change color to indicate that they are Selected. Rt-click and choose Delete and Close Gap from the menu. All remaining Clips on all Tracks will move to the left to close that gap.

           

          On to question two.

           

          Hope that this helps,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
            the_wine_snob Level 9
            Given a PE8 project, create a new project and import the former as a single clip.

             

            This can be a bit more involved, and will depend on exactly what you have, and what you will wish to do.

             

            Let's assume you have an SD (Standard Definition) Project, that you will wish to edit, and then will Export/Share as a combined file for inclusion in another Project.

             

            The Export/Share (Share in PrE 8 - no Export anymore) file format of choice is DV-AVI Type II. This file will include all edits in Project A, and will be Imported with those edits into Project B.

             

            Now, here are some concerns:

             

            If you will wish to do additiona editing of that resultant AVI, think about this - all edits in Project A will be set when you Export/Share. This means that if you have set the In & Out Points of all Clips on the Timeline in Project A, you will have NO Handles on those Clips, when you Export/Share. If you have added any Transitions, they will be part of that AVI. If later, you wish to remove a Transition, you will have to Cut it out. Then, if you wish to add another Transition, you will need Handles, and the ONLY way to get them will be to set the In & Out Points, thus loosing the number of Frames to accommodate the Duration of the new Transition. This will "tighten" your scenes by, say 15 Frames on each end. Same thing, if you have set those original In & Out Points tightly in the Clips in Project A - you will eliminate any Handles, when you Export/Share to AVI.

             

            Think about what you have in Project A, and will want to be able to do with that footage (in the single AVI) when you Import it into Project B. If you KNOW that you are done, and all is perfect, in Project A, just Export/Share to DV-AVI and Import that into Project B. If you think you might want to do more editing of that resultant AVI, then edit loosely in Project A, leaving Handles and not doing any Transitions. [Here, I would actually add about 02 sec. of Black Video, so I could easily find what were the Clip junctions, while on the Timeline in Project A.] Then, when the resultant AVI is Imported, you just cut out those Black Videos - they are just pointers for the editor. You'd still have your Handles, as you edited loosely, so Transitions could be added easily.

             

            Too often, editors cut tightly, add Transitions, Export/Share, Import and then realize that they want to change, say a Transition. All of a sudden, they are having to really tighten what was a separate Clip with Handles, back in Project A. There only choice is go back to Project A, loosen thing up a bit, and re-Export/Share. There is not really any other way around this. It is something to carefully consider, before one "finishes" Project A. If it's perfect, then just Export/Share, and Import. It will be complete and no further action will be required.

             

            Hope that this helps and good luck,

             

            Hunt

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            • 3. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
              Itay B. Level 1

              Thanks, Hunt.

              The "Ctrl+K" is very useful info, that i'll have to remember

               

              Is wonder whether it's possible, using your method of "lasso", to select, at a certain point of time (otherwise - there's the Ctrl+A combination), all tracks, when there are more tracks than can fit into the screen?

              Even if it is possible to use the "lasso" method to affect this selection, it seems rather cumbersome, isn't it?

              • 4. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                Itay B. Level 1

                Thanks for the detailed answer about exporting a project.

                From what you wrote in another thread, i understand that it's easier done in the Pro edition, where you can host several subprojects in a single project. Is this correct?

                • 5. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  As far as Ctrl+A (Select All) is concerned, I use it often. This is usually when I have done a rough edit of my Timeline, and want to insert several Titles. I usually start each Timeline with 02 sec. of Black Video*. That is actually the first thing to go into my Video folder in my Project Panel. I'll also often have a main Title, right behind it. Then, I add my AV files and edit them. When ready, I'll create the lead-in Titles. Now, I might have a half-dozen lead-in Titles and I find that by using Ctrl+A, I get everything. At that point I'll Shif-click on the 02 sec. Black Video and the main Title, so they are no longer Selected. With the rest Selected, I'll move it to the right, allowing me room for the lead-in Titles, and any additonal Black Video that I might use. If I do not have that many Assets down the Timeline, I might just lasso them, omitting the initial Black Video and the main Title. It all depends.

                   

                  As for seeing everything on the Timeline, you might want to try the \ key (Backslash), as it automatically zooms out on the Timeline showing everything. I always do this to get a look at the entire Timeline. One can do this with the zoom slideer too, but I find the \ key to be faster for me. One reason that I do this is that it's possible, especially with a long Timeline, to have "orphans." These are Clips, or bits of Clips that might have ended up out at the end, that I did not see, or forgot about. One can also look at the end of what they think is the end of the Timeline and see if it matches the TimeCode for the Timeline. If they do not match, then there might be an orphan out there someplace. One could also hit the End key to go to the actual end of the Timeline and see if the CTI (Current Time Indicator) rests just after the last Frame of their "The End" Title, or another Black Video in my case..

                   

                  I end up using keyboard shortcuts about half of the time. Some editors hardly ever touch a mouse. It all depends on how one likes to work. PrE (and PrPro) usually give one several ways to do something. It depends on how one wishes to do it.

                   

                  Good luck, and hope that this helps,

                   

                  Hunt

                   

                  * The reason that I always start with 02 sec. of Black Video is because I almost always work in DD 5.1 SS Audio, and many DVD set-top players, especially the higher-end units, take a few moments to lock into either DD 5.1 SS, or DTS Audio. I want my audience to get 100% of the Audio, even if it's faded up. This allows me to do it, as I will start my Audio at the end of that 02 sec. Black Video. The reason for the 02 sec. Black Video at the end is similar. I author in Adobe Encore. I Exprort from my NLE in elemental/elementary streams, i.e. one Video-only file and one Audio-only file. I marry these up in Encore. Since DVD-Video is built around Video, that Track must be 100% equal, or longer than the the Audio. If the Audio is even 1-2 audio-units longer, problems can occur. I always end my Audio before the end of the Video. Some refer to this as "Black Audio."

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                  • 6. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                    the_wine_snob Level 9
                    From what you wrote in another thread, i understand that it's easier done in the Pro edition, where you can host several subprojects in a single project. Is this correct?

                     

                    Not exactly, as I will try to explain.

                     

                    First, a little history lesson:

                     

                    In earlier versions of PrE, there was both the File>Export and also the Share tab. In PrE 8, it appears that everything was moved to the Share tab, but they forgot to remove the Export from the File drop-down. Now, going back, there was a bit of overlap between the two, so I understand why Adobe moved Export into Share. The term, Share, doesn't roll off my tongue, but I can see the positive marketing aspects of that. Anyway, in PrE 8, all exporting is under the Share tab, and the various sub-menus and drop-downs.

                     

                    Jump over to PrPro. In earlier versions of PrPro, there was the File>Export with several selections in the fly-out menu. Movie and Adobe Media Encoder (AME) were two. Again, there was a touch of overlap, but the two were under the same File>Export location. As of CS4, the File>Export>Movie went away, and everything goes through AME. Now, AME is a stand-alone program, though CAN be called from within PrPro. What this did was allow for one to load up the AME with several Sequences (those mini-Projects that I spoke of). One can then Export via AME several Sequences, while still working in PrPro - both batch processing, and a method to free up PrPro for more work. In the past, when you Exported, the program was otherwise unusable.

                     

                    In the past, one could only Export one of those Sequences at a time. Not so now that AME has been broken out and is a stand-alone. Most old-time users went ballistic, as they could not find there old Export options, and also resented having to use a stand-alone program, even if they could load and call it from within PrPro. Most of that clamor has subsided, but not completely.

                     

                    For me, the idea of Sequences is one close to my heart. I edit in them, as though they were "chapters," or "scenes." I Import them into Encore (my authoring program) as individual Timelines. I work with them as Chapters there. Until CS4, I had to Export the Video for Sequence 01, then the Audio for that Sequence. I'd move to Sequence 02 and do the same thing. Each Sequence would be handled the same way. Now, with CS4, I can load up all Sequences (actually twice), set the first instance to Export Video-only and the second instance to Export Audio-only, for ALL Sequences. I start the queue and turn my back. I can do all sorts of work, even in PrPro, while AME chugs away.

                     

                    Now, there are several file types, and CODEC's on my machine, that will Export/Share directly out of PrE, that will not Export from PrPro. Things like DivX can be directly handled out of PrE, but not out of PrPro. Differences. There are others that are available in PrPro, but not in PrE, like DLT tape, etc.

                     

                    I'd judge the speed of Export to be very similar between the two programs. The main difference is that PrPro CS4 can Export a bunch of stuff at one time and can also do it while one edits, but it takes a couple keystrokes to load it up, determine what is to be done, and then start the queue. PrE needs focus to Export/Share, but can do it with one click (after the settings are established).

                     

                    It's not really about quicker, or better, just differences. Sorry that I wasn't totally clear on this.

                     

                    There are other differences, in that PrE can also author a DVD-Video and do so easily, with some semi-automation. PrPro CS4 cannot. One must use Encore, or similar, and then all of the authoring is done by hand. There is no semi-automation, though with that extra work come vast power. Again, there is no better, just quick and neat from one program, or slower, great and with almost infinite power, using two programs.

                     

                    We get a lot of users, who are new to Encore on that forum, but have used programs like PrE. They cannot believe that there is no automation and that a user must do it all by hand. Most, however, are soon seduced by the power. It's just not what they were used to.

                     

                    Hope that this clears things up a bit,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                      Itay B. Level 1

                      As for seeing everything on the Timeline, you might want to try the \ key (Backslash), as it automatically zooms out on the Timeline showing everything

                      Thanks for the useful tip!

                      The backslash shows everything on the horizontal axis, but what if you wish to select all the tracks at a particular point of time, and there are more tracks than fit into the vertical screen estate?

                      • 8. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                        Itay B. Level 1

                        Thanks for your extensive replies. It's highly instructive to learn in detail how a professional editor sets about his job.

                        • 9. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                          the_wine_snob Level 9

                          what if you wish to select all the tracks at a particular point of time, and there are more tracks than fit into the vertical screen estate?


                          Because the Vertical Zoom is set differently, i.e. you have vertically expanded each Track, the easiest thing is to Click-drag on the bar above the Timeline to give more room to the Timeline Panel first. You've noticed that you can vertically zoom each Track independently, and that, to my knowledge, precludes a single keystroke from acting on Vertical Zoom, like the \ key does horizontally.

                           

                          Once you have all Tracks showing in the Timeline Panel, just lasso.

                           

                          Unless PrE 8 has introduced Custom Workspaces, that can be "memorized" with the Panel sizing, I cannot think of another way, but I'm sure that there are a lot of keyboard shortcuts that I do not know, or use. Still, due to the individual nature of Vertical Zoom and Tracks, I would doubt it.

                           

                          Good luck,

                           

                          Hunt

                          • 10. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                            the_wine_snob Level 9
                            It's highly instructive to learn in detail how a professional editor sets about his job.

                             

                            You are most welcome.

                             

                            It's a symbiotic thing however, as I usually learn something new from the questions asked. Often I have to go and explore myself, to try and find an answer. Plus, when others add info, there is nearly always a learning experience for me.

                             

                            I read about every article posted, even if they do not directly apply to what I do. There is always some tid-bit to pick up. Some are for now, and others are for later, such as when I go to HD. Lotta' knowledge just floating around here, and I try to get as much as possible.

                             

                            Good luck,

                             

                            Hunt

                             

                            BTW - you have had some very good questions!

                             

                            • 11. Re: Fr me it's all'r nothin' - Handling all channels as a unit
                              the_wine_snob Level 9

                              This is going back up to your OP on cutting all Clips on all Tracks at a certain point in the Timeline. I mentioned dragging the CTI, but if you know the Timecode, you can also click on the Timecode clock in the lower-left of the Progarm Monitor to highlight it, then type the Timecode, and you do not need to put in the delimiters, colon for PAL, or semi-colon for NTSC. If you want 01;00;00, for instance, just type "10000" and hit Enter - voom! the CTI is there. This can save some Click-dragging, and will hit the exact Frame that you want. [Remember that the CTI will go to the very end of that Frame, so the Frame that you are viewing, is the one right ahead of the CTI. Not sure about When you are zoomed in horizontally, you'll see a little blue bar to the right of the CTI. That's the Frame that you are seeing.]

                               

                              Hunt