6 Replies Latest reply on Nov 22, 2009 4:02 PM by Chrlz_B

    Defaults, Image Settings, Etc.

    Chrlz_B Level 1

      Members,

       

      Everyday I am learning a new technique in CS4, but I missed something basic way back in ACR 4.0 and now that ACR 5.0 supports the JPEG I am more confused. I need to know the relationship of the RAW preview and JPEG in the camera and when I change ACR Defaults ( for example after adjusting an image.), and how to use Image Settings, and Custom Settings properly. If I change my camera settings to Vivid, for example, what happens to ACR Defaults? Which takes precedent?

       

      I find the Adobe videos quite instructive and if someone can point me to one in regard to the above, know that I am grateful. Of course a text explanation would, in my thinking, be more personal.

       

      Regards to all,

       

      Charles

        • 1. Re: Defaults, Image Settings, Etc.
          MadManChan2000 Adobe Employee

          Your in-camera settings have no impact on the Camera Raw defaults, other than White Balance.

           

          It is up to you to choose your own preferred default settings -- within the Camera Raw interface, not the camera interface. If you do nothing, you will get the built-in Camera Raw defaults. You can override these. For example, if you prefer for your images to be a little brighter by default, you can set Brightness to +60 instead of +50. You can then go to the flyout menu and choose "Save New Camera Raw Defaults". Next time you bring in new images into Camera Raw, you will see that they are already adjusted to Brightness +60, without your having to lift a finger.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 3. Re: Defaults, Image Settings, Etc.
            Chrlz_B Level 1

            Here is another point.

             

            If my in-camera settings are irrelevant then what's the point of careful exposure and in-camera histogram settings? Am I allowing Adobe to make decisions for me then readjust in ACR for a second time: First in-camera, then in ACR?

             

            I've worked on Image Settings, Custom Settings, Presets, and other aspects of ACR 5.0 in the last few hours and my understanding is more complete, though not perfect. Next practice will be the Adjustment Brush > Erase (Harrington's video did not touch on that).

             

            Chrlz_B

            • 4. Re: Defaults, Image Settings, Etc.
              John Joslin Level 6

              Chrlz_B wrote:

              If my in-camera settings are irrelevant then what's the point of careful exposure and in-camera histogram settings?

               

               

              Eric said:

              Your in-camera settings have no impact on the Camera Raw defaults, other than White Balance.

               

              Which is not the same thing!

              • 5. Re: Defaults, Image Settings, Etc.
                Jeff Schewe Level 5

                Chrlz_B wrote:

                 

                If my in-camera settings are irrelevant then what's the point of careful exposure and in-camera histogram settings?

                 

                 

                Oh, it's absolutely critical to properly set your exposure–exposure, ISO and White Balance ARE indeed picked up and used by Camera Raw...it's just that all of the other "camera adjustments" are not. However, none of the other camera "tweaks" to your image are real...they're just metadata tags that get picked up by the camera makers' software but are ignored by ACR.

                 

                So, your actual ISO and exposure ARE important...those are indeed baked into the raw file. The White-point is picked up and used by default in ACR but you are capable of changing it...but color space, tone curves or other camera adjustments like converting to B&W are strictly done to JPEGs, not raws...

                • 6. Re: Defaults, Image Settings, Etc.
                  Chrlz_B Level 1

                  I will need to memorize and repeat Jeff's remarks 20 times each day. Maybe repeat reading manuals too! Shooting film was easier. Shooting digital is fun too, it's the software that's the (my) problem.

                   

                  Thanks responders,

                   

                  I'm working on this and I will get it right.

                   

                  Best to all,

                   

                  Chrlz_B