4 Replies Latest reply on Nov 23, 2009 10:15 AM by Harm Millaard

    Export file size nightmare...

    binary_finary

      Hi there,

       

      I have a problem with Premiere Pro CS3 when exporting video files, here are the basics:

       

      1. Footage is recorded using a little, cheap Toshiba HD cam. Not the best quality but it does record in 1080p. The camera stores the films on an SD card in .MOV format. For example - one of the clips I'm using is 781MB for 12mins of footage.

       

      2. In the project I'm doing, I'm also using standard PAL (720X576) footage from a DV cam. As the final render will be this size, I have no need for the HD footage to be in HD, plus, my computer struggles with it.

       

      3. To solve this, I'm importing the HD clips into a project set-up as PAL. Obviously, this means the HD footage is too big, so I use the "Scale" slider to scale it down. As it's widescreen, it looses a bit of the edges, but this is fine. As far as the project is concerned, I now have the video at 720x576 and it looks OK.

       

      4. Now I want to export the video as PAL. My presumption is that this will mean the HD clips will then be PAL, meaning I can work as easily with them as the clips from the DV tapes. As far as my project and computer is concerned, it will be just as though they were always in PAL.

       

      THE PROBLEM:
      When I export this simple 12 minute clip, I choose "Microsoft DV AVI" (I've also tried "Microsoft AVI") and go to the video settings. I choose "DV PAL" with a frame rate of "25fps" and a Pixel Aspect Ratio of "D1/DV PAL (1.067). The "quality" slider is not available.

       

      When I then click save, it takes around 1hour30mins to export a 12 minute clip. The resulting file is over 10GB by the time it is only half-way through rendering!!!

       

      Why is this? It makes no sense. Why is a PAL sized clip about 20 times larger than the original 1080p file?

       

      Am I missing a simple trick here?

        • 2. Re: Export file size nightmare...
          Harm Millaard Level 7

          Your Toshiba meaterial is unsuitable for editing. DV is about the least compressed material in terms of disk size, suitable for editing amd it takes around 13 GB/hour. Anything less than that may, may be adequate for watching, but is not suitable for editing. The only sensible way to go about this, if your desired output is DVD, is to convert your material to DV AV type2 prior to import. Use Google to find a converter.

          • 3. Re: Export file size nightmare...
            binary_finary Level 1

            It would seem I've now found a method that isn't quite as good as John's method in that video. Basically instead of using Premiere's "export" option, I used Adobe Media Convertor" and the file size is similar if I chose Quicktime (with H.264 compression). It still takes around an hour but the loss of quality isn't that great.

             

            Bear in mind that this is only a low-quality showreel and isn't intended for any important use, certainly not broadcast.

             

            Thanks for your video John, I'll certainly use that method in future. Does that work with CS3?

             

            Harm - When you say it is "unsuitable for editing", do you mean the file size (and lack of compression) means it just makes things too slow to work with? Would this explain why it's so laggy even with a good video card and loads of RAM?

             

            The camera is pretty poor. To be honest unless it's on a tripod (not moving) in broad daylight, the quality of my old JVC Handycam is better.

            • 4. Re: Export file size nightmare...
              Harm Millaard Level 7
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              Harm - When you say it is "unsuitable for editing", do you mean the file size (and lack of compression) means it just makes things too slow to work with? Would this explain why it's so laggy even with a good video card and loads of RAM?

               

              The camera is pretty poor. To be honest unless it's on a tripod (not moving) in broad daylight, the quality of my old JVC Handycam is better.

               

              You have seen it yourself, the compression is so heavy that it makes it uneditable. Even HDV would use around 2.6 GB for a 12 minute clip. The fact that Toshiba compresses it even further to around 1/3 of HDV material makes it unsuitable for editing, only suitable for watching. By compressing to that degree, you throw away so much information that can never be regained. It is over compressed to start with.

               

              A video card does hardly anything in video editing, it is about CPU power, RAM and disk setup. A video card is about the last on the list to have any impact.