2 Replies Latest reply on Dec 2, 2009 5:51 AM by the_wine_snob

    Can I slow pan across still photos in Elements?

    Positive Future

      First, thanks to Steve Grisetti and the Wine Snob for answering my first question so promptly and intelligently. I have only been using Elements for two weeks now but I'm already feeling really comfortable with it. It's very user-friendly and obviously been through extensive beta-testing...

       

      Question 2: I have a bunch of stills in the documentary I'm doing so I need to slow pan or slow zoom into them to make them a bit more interesting. Can I do this in Elements? If not, is there a third party application I can do it in and then load them into the main film as a short movie? That could be an option.

       

      ==> What other ways are there of making photos look more interesting in Elements?

       

      Thanks in advance for yr answers...

       

      Peace

        • 1. Re: Can I slow pan across still photos in Elements?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Absolutely!

           

          Did you use keyframing to create your pans and zooms? If not, it's worth knowing how to do it if you're looking to have more control over your motion paths and other effects.

           

          To slow your pan and/or zoom, you just move yorur keyframes farther apart. The closer the keyframes to each other, the faster the animation.

          • 2. Re: Can I slow pan across still photos in Elements?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Steve also has a multi-part set of articles on Keyframing in PrE. He covers the subject very well, and his articles are particular to PrE, which is good, because other versions of Premiere do it just a bit differently, from a pure mechanics standpoint. His articles are on Muvipix.

             

            Here is a Tutorial on Keyframing, but it's for Pr 6.0, prior to that program becoming PrPro. Still, the theory is identical, only the locations, and buttons to push to get started are different.

             

            Once one has the concept down, Keyframing becomes a very powerful tool, as many Effects can be controlled with them.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt