10 Replies Latest reply on Dec 3, 2009 10:17 AM by Harm Millaard

    basic save (rendering) question

    Ralph_Seoul122

      Hi ,

       

      I am lost on some of the basics, I have a MOV file which I wanted to cut up a bit and then simple resave , apparently this is not

      possible , and or rerender the file in its cut version. There are so many options on how to render a project to movie format

       

      How can I best import a MOV or AVI recut it and simple re save it without losing having to lose pixels in the process

       

      thanks a bunch

       

      Version is Premiere Por CS3 3.0.0 (374)

        • 1. Re: basic save (rendering) question
          Jim_Simon Level 8

          I am lost on some of the basics

           

          Then you really should get caught up on those BEFORE you try using Premiere Pro.

          • 2. Re: basic save (rendering) question
            Ralph_Seoul122 Level 1

            Not much help there

            Sir ,

             

            How can I respond to a remark like that ?


            • 3. Re: basic save (rendering) question
              Harm Millaard Level 7

              By showing your final certificate of the video course you completed successfully, for instance.

              • 4. Re: basic save (rendering) question
                Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                Ralph_Seoul122 wrote:

                 

                Not much help there

                Sir ,

                 

                How can I respond to a remark like that ?


                Jim is trying to give you advice on how to help you solve your own problem.  His method of learning was/is learn-then-do.  Others may not prefer that method.  Whether ability or choice dictates for an individual on how best to learn a program or a craft, all options should be explored.

                 

                Like any other piece of advice, if it doesn't fit what you're trying to do, or it simply doesn't work for you, then you ignore it and wait for other suggestions that may be forthcoming.  You don't have to respond at all.

                 

                You can minimize any quality loss on export by ensuring that your export codec and video parameters match your source codec and video parameters exactly.  You should also be editing in a project that matches your source video exactly.  If presets that match your source video don't exist, then you can "roll your own" by choosing the Desktop editing mode when you create a new project.

                 

                You should also update your copy of CS3 to version 3.2.0

                 

                -Jeff

                • 5. Re: basic save (rendering) question
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Ralph,

                   

                  Depending on your source footage, you might not be able to do what you want 100%.

                   

                  For the .MOV footage, you might be better off getting Apple's QuickTime Player Pro (US$29 upgrade/unlock). It will allow limited editing, about that which you describe, and will do a pretty good job at letting you Save in the same format.

                   

                  Now, if you have DV-AVI Type II material, you can do what you want, and then Export as DV-AVI Type II (uncheck Recompress) and there is only very minimal loss in quality. I doubt that you could ever detect it.

                   

                  As a bit of background, let's step through just what happens, when one has footage that is not I-frame (all Frames individually present). First, PrPro will basically convert this GOP (Group of Pictures) footage into full I-frame. The "difference Frames" in that footage will be rendered in, so that one can edit at a Frame level. At this point, you no longer have that original GOP structure, but full I-frame. If you THEN Export to the original GOP format, you WILL recompress that footage, loosing quality. The best that you can probably do is to use an intermediate CODEC, like the Lagarith Lossless, to get an Exported file, though in a new format, not the original compressed GOP one.

                   

                  With .MOV files, if the CODEC used is the Animation CODEC, you can do editing and then Export to .MOV, using the Animation CODEC w/ minimal loss in quality. With other .MOV CODEC's, it will very likely not be as good, but that will depend on the exact CODEC used in both the source footage and the Exported footage.

                   

                  MOV, AVI, MPEG, WMV are but "wrappers," and much can be inside them - they are NOT created equal. This ARTICLE will give you a bit of background on these "wrappers." I'd also suggest doing a Google search for "GOP" and read some of the articles on Group of Pictures formats. I believe that you'll get the idea of what that footage is all about. Jim Taylor, author of DVD Demystified, has a great analogy, "birds on a telephone," that outlines the GOP structure in clear, easy to understand terms.

                   

                  Good luck, and sorry that the answer to your question is - it depends.

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: basic save (rendering) question
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    Here's my paraphrasing of Jim Taylor's "birds on the telephone," in this ARTICLE.

                     

                    Hope that this helps,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: basic save (rendering) question
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      Here is a LINK to DVD Demystified DVD FAQ. There is a lot of great info on file types, especially MPEG-2. It also translates to many other GOP formats too.

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt

                      • 8. Re: basic save (rendering) question
                        Jim_Simon Level 8
                        His method of learning was/is learn-then-do.

                         

                        Just for clarity's sake, I am not suggesting a method of learning.  I am stating the correct sequence of actions.  First, you learn when you need to know, and then you apply that knowledge towards the desired goal.  That is true for all persons and every subject about which something is known.  Only when one is engaging in experimental research, where little or nothing is known, is it appropriate to "do" before "learning".  That exception does not apply here.  A great deal is known about video production.  Anyone attempting to engage upon that activity should learn what they need to know first, and only then try their hand at editing.  That IS the correct sequence of actions.  Skipping step one will only lead to unnecessary difficulty, as evidenced by this thread.

                         

                        And anyone not enforcing the correct sequence of actions is only enabling further difficulty for that individual.  THAT is just mean.

                        • 9. Re: basic save (rendering) question
                          Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                          Jim,

                           

                          We disagree on almost all of those points.  You have stated your opinion on many occasions, and that's fine.  It's also fine when others state their differing opinions.  You probably shouldn't expect universal agreement with your point of view.

                           

                          -Jeff

                          • 10. Re: basic save (rendering) question
                            Harm Millaard Level 7

                            Jim,

                             

                            I have to agree with Jeff here and with Bill, who has often stated there are different ways to learn.

                             

                            I do agree that when the OP states he does not know the basics, he better learn those basics. How is his responsability.

                             

                            You know, there are some that consider me to be slightly more than a complete nitwit when it is about computers, storage and other hardware. Did I follow classes in engineering? No. I have read about these topics from books, the internet, magazines, etc. I have done my own share of building systems, I consult experts in this field to learn from their experiences, I started with the basics and progressed somewhat from there.

                             

                            But in essence, I'm an autodidact, which means I had a fool as a teacher. Big smiley.jpg