14 Replies Latest reply on Jan 19, 2010 10:03 AM by the_wine_snob

    Editing xvid

    happy keith

      HI,

       

      I am editing video shot with a camera that compresses the files using xvid.

       

      When I try to edit the files they are quite jerky (except for the bits that have been automatically rendered.) To get around this I have converted the files to AVI or mpg and this works fine but of course this is some loss of quality

       

      I have the project setting to import from a Hard Drive Camera.

       

      I know there are a few things I could do to alleviate this problem-use a converter of some kind or chop all the excess bits out of the video before I start to edit but generally the only time I watch the whole video (it is off a helmet camera) is when I edit it.

       

      I want to retain the best quality output and watch it as I edit it. Is there anyway I can import to the timeline and edit/watch the video without it being jerky or should I just import it and let the project render and then do what ever I want to do....or convert the files using AP or some other application-and retain the quality

       

      cheers

        • 1. Re: Editing xvid
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          As we explain in the FAQs to the right of this forum, Xvid is one of the codecs you definitely can not edit natively in Premiere Elements (or in virtually any video editor).

           

          I recommend you use Prism to convert the files to DV-AVIs.

          http://forums.adobe.com/thread/415317?tstart=0

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Editing xvid
            the_wine_snob Level 9
            To get around this I have converted the files to AVI or mpg and this works fine but of course this is some loss of quality.

             

            If you convert to DV-AVI Type II, there will be no loss in quality, beyond what has already happened with the Xvid compression. Xvid, and its commercial cousin, DivX, are both delivery-only formats. They do a good job at heavy compression for streaming Video. They are not designed to be edited.

             

            My guess is that you have a helmet-cam, or similar, and that footage, unfortunately, is designed to be viewed and not edited. The only reason to use it in a camera is to save space and record material for viewing, or directly uploading to a Web site.

             

            Good luck, and I know what you're going through. Too many clients hand this sort of footage over to me, and wonder where the quality went - it left, when the material was compressed to begin with.

             

            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Editing xvid
              happy keith Level 1

              Thanks for that and thanks for pointing me in the right direction. The output is from a helmet cam

              • 4. Re: Editing xvid
                happy keith Level 1

                Thanks for that. This was the answer that I pretty well expected. I've been struggling with these files for a while and thought it must have been something I was doing wrong

                 

                cheers

                • 5. Re: Editing xvid
                  happy keith Level 1

                  Thanks for that. The footage is from a helmet cam. The output is ok but there is a loss of quality from the original to an edited file and this explains it all...

                  • 6. Re: Editing xvid
                    the_wine_snob Level 9
                    The output is from a helmet cam.

                     

                    That makes sense, as they have limited physical space, and also limited physical storage space, so some form of heavy compression is used to get more than a few moments of data onto the recording medium, usually a small HDD, flash card, or even mini-DVD.

                     

                    Personally, I wish that these camera mfgrs. would opt for some of the newer flash cards, and dispense with the heavy compression. My wife's Canon still camera uses a 16GB HC MMCplus cards, and 32GB cards are in the pipeline. These are tiny cards, and are amazingly fast and have very large capacities. Now, one would probably still have some compression, say to MPEG-2, or limit the recording time to ~ 2 hours with a 32GB card, but that would be better than the Xvid, or DivX compression, which is extreme.

                     

                    As one who has to deal with Xivd & DivX footage, I feel your pain.

                     

                    Good luck,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: Editing xvid
                      happy keith Level 1

                      As one who has to deal with Xivd & DivX footage, I feel your pain.

                       

                      Thanks. I have been using my own work around which as it turns out is more or less the right one.

                       

                      would you advise using a third party converter (like prisim)  or simply render the files in Premiere?

                      • 8. Re: Editing xvid
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        I am a big fan of using the best utility available to do any conversion outside of my NLE. The results are usually better, and there is far less processing overhead on the NLE and the system.

                         

                        I use a shareware conversion program, DigitalMedia Converter, but many sing the praises of Prism. I have not used it, but it's free and seems to work well for so many.

                         

                        Good luck,

                         

                        Hunt

                         

                        PS - I also have used other NLE's, such as CyberLink's PowerDirector, and Magix Movie Edit Pro. Both are more lenient with regards to formats & CODEC's, but then I do not edit in them - just use them to convert, or as in the case of Magix, Import/Export their proprietary AV format, which in my case, comes from their Magix Music Studio.

                        • 9. Re: Editing xvid
                          happy keith Level 1

                          Thanks for that. I'll try the Digital Medie Converter

                          • 10. Re: Editing xvid
                            the_wine_snob Level 9

                            When I first looked into DigitalMedia Converter, there was a trial. It was only limited by time, IIRC. I used it on about 3 different formats, and was so pleased, that I bought two copies of the program, one for the workstation and one for the laptop.

                             

                            There is a new version available now, and I have my upgrade promo code, but have to admit that I have not purchased the upgrade yet. Maybe I'll get busy and do that today!

                             

                            One of the biggest "features" of DMC is that it does NOT ship with, nor install any CODEC's of its own. This means two things: the user will need to locate and install any necessary CODEC's, that are not already installed, and that it will NOT overwrite, corrupt or otherwise smurf any existing CODEC's. When it comes to CODEC's, I am a really big fan of installing ONLY the ones needed, when needed, and also going to the source for those CODEC's, even if I have to pay for them. I'd always rather have the source CODEC's for $, than free ones, that are hacked, or reverse-engineered. Some will go for free all of the time, and many love to collect all sorts of CODEC's, just in case. I just want the best, and only when needed. [Climbing off my soapbox]

                             

                            Good luck, and I hope that it works as well for you, as it does for me.

                             

                            As a side note: I often use CyberLink's PowerDirector, or Magix Movie Edit Pro, to ingest footage with odd CODEC's. They both do a better job of this, than either my PrE, or PrPro. Now, I do almost no real editing in these (find them rather clunky and crash-prone), and will always quickly Export to DV-AVI Type II files for the real editing. For me, they are just more "tools" in my "toolbox." To date, there have been very few files that I could not get to work, using either DMC, PowerDirector or MMEP. Oh, I also use QuickTime Pro for .MOV, or MP4 conversion too. Just more tools!

                             

                            I've yet to find any one NLE that can do it all natively. I use the programs that work the best for me, and just prepare my footage to DV-AVI Type II w/ 48KHz 16-bit PCM/WAV Audio, prior to Import. I do the same for any MP3 Audio - it goes to 48KHz 16-bit PCM/WAV before Import. I guess that I have a boring workflow, but it always works perfectly, so I should not complain.

                             

                            Good luck,

                             

                            Hunt

                            • 11. Re: Editing xvid
                              happy keith Level 1

                              Thanks for your advice. I have just downloaded and setup DMC and the

                              advantages are immediately obvious-the speed of the conversion.

                               

                              Cheers

                               

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                              • 12. Re: Editing xvid
                                the_wine_snob Level 9

                                Probably the first thing that sold me on DMC was its batch capabilities. This has been added to conversion programs recently, but going back, most were one file at a time.

                                 

                                Good luck,

                                 

                                Hunt

                                • 13. Re: Editing xvid
                                  elneptico Level 1

                                  Adobe Encoder isn't good to convert it?

                                  • 14. Re: Editing xvid
                                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                                    Actually, for some troublesome formats/CODEC's, I use PrE as a "converter," to get footage into PrPro, that is much more sensitive to those aspects. All depends on exactly what the format/CODEC is, and whether PrE, or another NLE can work with the footage, and then Export/Share to DV-AVI Type II.

                                     

                                    I am not aware of Adobe Encoder, per se. Do you mean Adobe Media Encoder (AME) in PrPro? If so, it can be used, so long as PrPro can work with the footage. It is more limited, than PrE, and others in that respect. If the footage works in PrPro, I just Import and edit.

                                     

                                    Good luck,

                                     

                                    Hunt