5 Replies Latest reply on Dec 21, 2009 7:34 PM by the_wine_snob

    Need a H Drive

    scubatv

      I'm working with a Costco ZT System i7 920 Windows 7 Home and need to change the video hard drive I just installed to H to easily "work" with my *prpro

      files.

       

       

      In Windows 7 Home I'm not getting the H: drive choice. Nor the E: or D: for that matter.

       

      Any suggestions, please.

       

      In the past, when the drive letter had changed and Premiere asked where are the files, I tried to point the program to the correct directories, hoping Premiere would find all the files. The directory structure was the same, just the drive letter changed.

       

      Anyway, that did not work, so, now, to make life easy, I really need to change this new sATA drive to H:

       

      Thanks, Jon

        • 1. Re: Need a H Drive
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          I do not know about Win7, but in XP-Pro, one would go to Computer Management (Local) and then to Disk Management to check your installation. Make sure that it is showing properly there, and also check that your new HDD is seen in your BIOS (Setup).

           

          On the Disk Management screen, you can assign the drive letter to that HDD.

           

          Now, if you have done all of this, all is well, and PrPro is not seeing any HDD beyond C:\, I'd wonder is some aspect of the OS is blocking total access to your other HDD's. I just do not know Win7, so cannot help there.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Need a H Drive
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Here's the XP instructions. I'd guess that Win7 is very similar, with maybe some locations slightly different and maybe some syntax changes:

             

            To assign, change, or remove a drive letter

            Using the Windows interface

            1. Open Computer Management (Local).
            2. In the console tree, click Disk Management.
            3. Right-click a partition, logical drive, or volume, and then click Change  Drive Letter and Paths.
            4. Do one of the following: 
              • To assign a drive letter, click Add, click the drive letter you want  to use, and then click OK.
              • To modify a drive letter, click it, click Change, click the drive  letter you want to use, and then click OK.
              • To remove a drive letter, click it, and then click Remove.

            Important

            • Be careful when making drive-letter assignments because many  MS-DOS and Windows programs make references to a specific drive  letter. For example, the path environment variable shows specific drive letters in conjunction with program names.

            Notes

            • To open Computer Management, click Start, and then click  Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then  double-click Computer Management.
            • You must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the  Administrators group in order to complete this procedure. If your computer is  connected to a network, network policy settings might also prevent you from  completing this procedure.
            • A computer can use up to 26 drive letters. Drive letters A and B are  reserved for floppy disk drives, but you can assign these letters to removable  drives if the computer does not have a floppy disk drive. Hard disk drives in  the computer receive letters C through Z, while mapped network drives are  assigned drive letters in reverse order (Z through B).
            • You cannot change the drive letter of the system  volume or boot volume.
            • An error message may appear when you attempt to assign a letter to a volume,  CD-ROM drive, or other removable media device, possibly because it is in use by  a program in the system. If this happens, close the program accessing the volume  or drive, and then click the Change Drive Letter and Paths command again.
            • Windows 2000 and Windows XP allow the static assignment of drive  letters on volumes, partitions, and CD-ROM drives. This means that you  permanently assign a drive letter to a specific partition, volume, or CD-ROM  drive. When you add a new hard disk to an existing computer system, it will not  affect statically assigned drive letters.
            • You can also mount a local drive at an empty folder on an NTFS volume using  a drive path instead of a drive letter. For more information, click Related  Topics.

            Using a command line

            1. Open Command Prompt.
            2. Type:

              diskpart

            3. At the DISKPART prompt, type:

              list volume

              Make note of the number of the simple volume whose drive letter you want to  assign, change, or remove.

            4. At the DISKPART prompt, type:

              select volume n

              Select the volume, where n is the volume's number, whose drive letter  you want to assign, change, or remove.

            5. At the DISKPART prompt, type one of the following: 
              • assign letter=L

                Where L is the drive letter you want to assign or change.

              • remove letter=L

                Where L is the drive letter you want to  remove.

            Value Description
            list volumeDisplays a list of basic and dynamic volumes on all  disks.
            select volumeSelects the specified volume, where n is the volume number, and  shifts the focus to it. If no volume is specified, the select command  lists the current volume with focus. You can specify the volume by number, drive  letter, or mount point path. On a basic disk, selecting a volume also gives the  corresponding partition focus.
            assign letter=LAssigns a drive letter, L, to the volume with focus. If no drive  letter is specified, then the next available drive letter is assigned. If the  drive letter is already in use, an error is generated.
            remove letter=LRemoves the drive letter, L, from the volume with focus. If no drive  letter or mount point is specified, then DiskPart removes the first drive  letter or mount point it encounters.

            The remove command can be used to change the drive letter associated  with a removable drive. You cannot remove the drive letters on system, boot, or  paging volumes. In addition, you cannot remove the drive letter for an OEM  partition, any GPT partition with an unrecognized GUID, or any of the special,  non-data, GPT partitions such as the EFI system  partition.

            Notes

            • To open a command prompt, click Start, point to All  Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command  Prompt.
            • You must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the  Administrators group in order to complete this procedure. If your computer is  connected to a network, network policy settings might also prevent you from  completing this procedure.
            • A computer can use up to 26 drive letters. Drive letters A and B are  reserved for floppy disk drives, but you can assign these letters to removable  drives if the computer does not have a floppy disk drive. Hard disk drives in  the computer receive letters C through Z, while mapped network drives are  assigned drive letters in reverse order (Z through B).
            • You cannot change the drive letter of the system  volume or boot volume.
            • An error message may appear when you attempt to assign a letter to a volume,  CD-ROM drive, or other removable media device, possibly because it is in use by  a program in the system. If this happens, close the program accessing the volume  or drive, and then click the Change Drive Letter and Paths command again.
            • Windows 2000 and Windows XP allow the static assignment of drive  letters on volumes, partitions, and CD-ROM drives. This means that you  permanently assign a drive letter to a specific partition, volume, or CD-ROM  drive. When you add a new hard disk to an existing computer system, it will not  affect statically assigned drive letters.
            • You can also mount a local drive at an empty folder on an NTFS volume  using a drive path instead of a drive letter. For more information, click  Related Topics.
            • For more information about DiskPart, click Related Topics.
            Good luck,
            Hunt

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Need a H Drive
              scubatv Level 1

              Thanks.

              The first problem was the installed "C:" partitioned drive. Then the CD was drive "D:" and the media card readers grabbed my precious "H:".

              We disconnect "everything" then booted up and installed Windows 7 on the new drive. Removed the partition and quick formatted the old system "C:" and along with disconnecting everything, especially the media card readers that were taking up "H:", gave me back my "H:".

              Thank you for your quick and comprehensive answers.

              This Windows 7 seems pretty good. Sure hope it works with me Pro 1.5

              • 4. Re: Need a H Drive
                scubatv Level 1

                Hunt, just want to say. I've never used Windows 7 nor Vista before today, but all the "stuff" seems to be

                in the same place as XP.

                • 5. Re: Need a H Drive
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  You know, that is great news on two fronts: first, you got things sorted out, and second MS did not move too much too far. I always get hooked, when I get into too much detail on either an OS, or a more recent version of PrPro. I get a few corrections along the line of "oh, Adobe moved that as of CS4.xx. Didn't you get the memo?"

                   

                  As for your card reader, in the Disk Management screen, you could have moved it to, say J:\, if it was free, set your drive to H:\, then move the reader back to whatever you needed. I've been in similar situations, and have had to juggle the drives around, until I had them all set, as I required.

                   

                  Good luck, and rest easy - if you make no more changes to the drive letters, you should be able to edit easily, after you verify that your current location is fine.

                   

                  Hunt