6 Replies Latest reply on Jan 2, 2010 6:15 AM by HarryPutnam

    Graphic `sets' inside symbols

    HarryPutnam Level 1

      searching here and googling for how one creates sets of graphics in a single symbol, has so far been unsuccessful.

       

      One of David Stillers' Online tutorials  HERE

       

      Shows the use of multiple graphics sets stored inside a single symbol and how to access them.  However there is no comment about how to create them.  Probably not necessary for an intermediate or advanced user but for me being really new... its not at all apparent how this is done.

       

      I'm attempting to create the illusion of a mule walking by fiddling with the legs in a set of graphics and then hope to animate them.

      It appears I could put them into a single symbol as shown in the above video and access them as described there.

       

      Maybe there are better ways... but at any rate I still want to know how to put multiple versions of a grapic into a single symbol.

        • 1. Re: Graphic `sets' inside symbols
          Ned Murphy Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Your best bet is to experiment.  Start by creating a new movieclip symbol, and then add different things to different layers and different frames to see how animating along the timeline works.  For instance, if you are familiar with the way you can doodle into the corners of pages of a book and them flip thru them to see the doodle animate, you can achieve the same effect using a sequence of frames.  So your best bet, short of searching for tutorials more specific in nature, is to experiment.

          • 2. Re: Graphic `sets' inside symbols
            HarryPutnam Level 1

            Ned Murphy wrote:

             

            Your best bet is to experiment.  Start by creating a new movieclip symbol, and then add different things to different layers and different frames to see how animating along the timeline works.  For instance, if you are familiar with the way you can doodle into the corners of pages of a book and them flip thru them to see the doodle animate, you can achieve the same effect using a sequence of frames.  So your best bet, short of searching for tutorials more specific in nature, is to experiment.

             

            Sorry I wasn't clear in my question..

             

            These is a specific technique of storing multiple graphics inside one symbol.  It is displayed in the referenced tutorial about 1/4 to 1/3 of the way thru the video.  David Sitter shows a whole set of of facial expressions stored inside a single symbol.  Then demonstartates how to access those various versions for tweening.

             

            I'm not asking how to make the mule walk... I think I know how to do it using that method.  My question is how to create a symbol with multiple versions of a graphic stored inside.... That part is not explained in the tutorial.  I know how to create a symbol but somehow not readily seeing how to have multiple versions of a graphic inside a single symbol.

             

            Sorry to ask for futher time from you but if you take a quick look at this Tutorial VIDEO

            (And I'm sorry to say they  have arranged it so you have to sit thru about 7-8 seconds (Thank god .. not 6-8 Minutes)  of silly music before the video proper comes on, but once it does you can just scrub the playhead to somewhere between 1/4 to 1/3 of the way  and see exactly what I'm talking about without having to spend much time.

             

            Somehow he has stored 6-7 different versions of the same head inside a single symbol and is able to tween the versions.

            The tweeing I think I can see how to do, but getting multiple versions of the mule into a symbol... Versions with the legs in different positions, I'm not seeing how to do.

            • 3. Re: Graphic `sets' inside symbols
              Ned Murphy Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              While David hasn't been around much since the forum changed over last April, he is normally very helpful.  You might try getting his attention to see if he can resolve your problem... if it isn't clear to you, he may appreciate that he might make it possibly clearer for all with your help. You should be able to find him listed on the right side here... http://forums.adobe.com/community/flash/flash_design

               

              My recommendation of playing with movieclips stands... each frame can hold a different view of something and you can command where to go in that moiveclip's timeline.

              • 4. Re: Graphic `sets' inside symbols
                HarryPutnam Level 1

                Ned Murphy wrote:

                 

                . . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .     You might try getting his attention to see if he can resolve your problem... if it isn't clear to you, he may appreciate that he might make it possibly clearer for all with your help. You should be able to find him listed on the right side here... http://forums.adobe.com/community/flash/flash_design

                 

                The chances of connecting on New years are probably a bit slim... but thanks .   I have sent him a private message.

                 

                I've now found more videos where that technique is used but still no explanation of how one inserts multiple graphics into the symobl.

                Apparently Chris Georgenes is one developer who has used the technique and describes using it HERE

                 

                In the `lip synching' Tutorial.   It must be something the reader is expected to know how to do because George apparently doesn't think its necessary to describe how to get multiple versions of a graphic into one symbol either.

                 

                Thanks again for your time.

                • 5. Re: Graphic `sets' inside symbols
                  Rothrock Level 5

                  What do you mean how to create them? You just create them. You can make a new graphic, and then draw the artwork giving each version of the part its own keyframe.

                   

                  So where he shows the mouths around 4 minutes. You would create a new graphic symbol, cut one of the mouths and paste it on the timeline. You would then make a new blank keyframe, go copy the next mouth and paste it on that frame and so on. You would then have the nested graphic that he shows at about 5 minutes.

                   

                  BTW this technique is the best thing I've ever learned about animating in Flash.

                  • 6. Re: Graphic `sets' inside symbols
                    HarryPutnam Level 1

                    Rothrock wrote:

                     

                    What do you mean how to create them? You just create them. You can make a new graphic, and then draw the artwork giving each version of the part its own keyframe.

                     

                    So where he shows the mouths around 4 minutes. You would create a new graphic symbol, cut one of the mouths and paste it on the timeline. You would then make a new blank keyframe, go copy the next mouth and paste it on that frame and so on. You would then have the nested graphic that he shows at about 5 minutes.

                     

                    BTW this technique is the best thing I've ever learned about animating in Flash.

                    Ahhhhh   I see now.  Sorry, I guess I didn't really get that you could have multiple timelines holding the symbol contents.

                     

                    Also didn't always understand the meanings of `art work', graphic, and `symbol.'   Might have a much better idea now.

                     

                    I am very new to Flash. Not to mention suffering from a deep seated dimness to boot.

                     

                    Thanks for your patience, I think I got it now.  Pretty slick too.  I only have 2 instances of graphic inside the symbol but even then it makes setting up the tweens quite easy, and now seeing how I can use the technique for the rest of the moving parts too.